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I am working on a batch file at the moment.

It requires a calling of a VBS and a REG so I used the %-dp0 variable to get the folder path. However, it seems to give me the equivalent of the system32 path.

What is the problem here and are there any equivalents?

Here is my code:

cd %-dp0
cscript.exe VBS.vbs
cscript.exe VBS2.vbs
goto :eof

And:

cd %-dp0
regedit.exe Regedit.reg
goto :eof

It returns something like this:

Can't find C:\WINDOWS\system32\VBS.vbs

closed as off-topic by abelenky, Stephan, aschipfl, SomethingDark, Mofi Mar 14 '17 at 6:48

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – abelenky, Stephan, aschipfl, SomethingDark, Mofi
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 2
    Try to add echo %~dp0 and echo %CD% after your CD. Btw. CD without /D option will not change the drive – jeb Mar 13 '17 at 11:37
  • The use of the tilde is documented in the CALL and FOR commands. – Squashman Mar 13 '17 at 12:24
  • 3
    This question was caused by a simple typographical error. – abelenky Mar 13 '17 at 14:51
4

I think there is a typo in your script Instead of %-dp0 you should write it like this with tilde %~dp0

And your script becomes like this :

cd %~dp0
cscript.exe VBS.vbs
cscript.exe VBS2.vbs
goto :eof
  • 3
    You have better eyes than me, I haven't seen the difference – jeb Mar 13 '17 at 11:40

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