I'm writing a program where I need to get a line of input that consists of a letter and two numbers with spaces in between.Let's say,something like "I 5 6".

I use std::getline to get input as a string so there wouldn't be any problems with the blank space and then a for loop to browse through the individual characters in the string. I need a certain condition to execute only if the 2nd and 3rd characters(3rd and 5th counting the blanks) are numbers.

How can I test if a character at a certain position in a string is an int?

  • 1
    Show the code, what have you done so far – Sniper Mar 13 '17 at 12:19
  • 1
    Use std::istringstream to do that. – πάντα ῥεῖ Mar 13 '17 at 12:19
  • You should include the code and the output you have so far – DanAl Mar 13 '17 at 12:19
  • "4th and 5th counting the blanks" should be 3rd and 5th, no? – user463035818 Mar 13 '17 at 12:21
  • Are the numbers strictly single-digit? – ildjarn Mar 13 '17 at 12:21
up vote 2 down vote accepted

For your purpose, I would put the line into an std::istringstream and use the normal stream extraction operator to get the values from it.

Perhaps something like

char c;
int i1, i2;

std::istringstream oss(line);  // line is the std::string you read into with std::getline

if (oss >> c >> i1 >> i2)
{
    // All read perfectly fine
}
else
{
    // There was an error parsing the input
}
  • Even though the other answers provide a good explanation to the exact question I asked , this is the best one because it checks for int regardless of its exact position in the string and also works with numbers that consist of more than one character. Cheers ! – fishyperil Mar 13 '17 at 12:39
  • Hey I have a problem - I understand what this does in theory but when I tried actually running the code I get std::istringstream oss "incomplete type is not allowed". I'm a beginner and streams are pretty much uncharted territory for me, so could you explain what the issue is ? – fishyperil Mar 13 '17 at 13:04
  • @fishyperil Follow the link to the reference and see what header file you need to #include. – Some programmer dude Mar 13 '17 at 13:08
  • alright thx, thought it might be a header file :) – fishyperil Mar 13 '17 at 13:09

You can use isalpha. Here is an example:

/* isalpha example */
#include <stdio.h>
#include <ctype.h>
int main ()
{
  int i=0;
  char str[]="C++";
  while (str[i])
  {
    if (isalpha(str[i])) printf ("character %c is alphabetic\n",str[i]);
    else printf ("character %c is not alphabetic\n",str[i]);
    i++;
  }
  return 0;
}

isalpha Checks whether c is an alphabetic letter. http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cctype/isalpha/

The output will be:

character C is alphabetic character + is not alphabetic character + is not alphabetic

And for digits use isdigit:

/* isdigit example */
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <ctype.h>
int main ()
{
  char str[]="1776ad";
  int year;
  if (isdigit(str[0]))
  {
    year = atoi (str);
    printf ("The year that followed %d was %d.\n",year,year+1);
  }
  return 0;
}

The output will be:

The year that followed 1776 was 1777

isdigit Checks whether c is a decimal digit character. http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cctype/isdigit/

  • How would that work to find numeric digits? – πάντα ῥεῖ Mar 13 '17 at 12:23
  • I edited the answer accordingly – DanAl Mar 13 '17 at 12:25
  • Thx for the answer, gonna check it out and see how it compares , for my purposes, to what the guy above said. Cheers either way. – fishyperil Mar 13 '17 at 12:32

There is a function isdigit() for it:

To check 2nd and 3rd characters of a string s you can use this code:

if (isdigit(s[2]) && isdigit(s[3]))
{
  // both characters are digits
}

But in your case (s == "I 5 6") it seems that you need to check s[2] and s[4].

  • s[2] is the 3rd position and s[3] the fourth. – πάντα ῥεῖ Mar 13 '17 at 12:22
  • Thank you for this comment. Yes, this is not clear what exactly he need. If his line is "I 5 6", he need to check s[2] and s[4]. – Ilya Mar 13 '17 at 12:25
  • Yeah , you're right , I should have addressed the characters by their indexes to avoid the confusion. Thx for the answer, I'm gonna look into isdigit(). – fishyperil Mar 13 '17 at 12:30

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