-5

For all lines (about 30000) in a file, I want to find the number of characters in the beginning of current line that are same as previous line. For example input:

#to
#top
/0linyier
/10000001659/item/1097859586891251/
/10000001659/item/1191085827568626/
/10000121381/item/890759920974460/
/10000154478/item/1118425481552267/
/10897504949/pic/89875494927073741108975049493956/108987352826059/?lang=3
/1175332/item/10150825241495757/
/806123/item/10210653847881125/
/51927642128/item/488930816844251927642128/341878905879428/

I expect:

0   #to
3   #top
0   /0linyier
1   /10000001659/item/1097859586891251/
19  /10000001659/item/1191085827568626/
6   /10000121381/item/890759920974460/
7   /10000154478/item/1118425481552267/
3   /10897504949/pic/89875494927073741108975049493956/108987352826059/?lang=3
2   /1175332/item/10150825241495757/
1   /806123/item/10210653847881125/
1   /51927642128/item/488930816844251927642128/341878905879428/

I am trying to work in perl by unpacking the strings into characters and counting till first mismatch but I wonder if there is some not too slow method using built in functions of awk or perl.

Update: I have added my attempt as an answer.

2

Like this, perhaps?

It's written in Perl

use strict;
use warnings 'all';

my $prev = "";

while ( my $line = <DATA> ) {

    chomp $line;

    my $max = 0;
    ++$max until $max > length($line) or substr($prev, 0, $max) ne substr($line, 0, $max);

    printf "%-2d  %s\n", $max-1, $line;

    $prev = $line;
}

__DATA__
#to
#top
/0linyier
/10000001659/item/1097859586891251/
/10000001659/item/1191085827568626/
/10000121381/item/890759920974460/
/10000154478/item/1118425481552267/
/10897504949/pic/89875494927073741108975049493956/108987352826059/?lang=3
/1175332/item/10150825241495757/
/806123/item/10210653847881125/
/51927642128/item/488930816844251927642128/341878905879428/

output

0   #to
3   #top
0   /0linyier
1   /10000001659/item/1097859586891251/
19  /10000001659/item/1191085827568626/
6   /10000121381/item/890759920974460/
7   /10000154478/item/1118425481552267/
3   /10897504949/pic/89875494927073741108975049493956/108987352826059/?lang=3
2   /1175332/item/10150825241495757/
1   /806123/item/10210653847881125/
1   /51927642128/item/488930816844251927642128/341878905879428/[Finished in 0.1s]
| improve this answer | |
1

Using

awk -v FS="" 'p{
    pl=0; 
    split(p,a,r); 
    for(i=1;i in a; i++)
          if(a[i]==$i){ pl++ }else { break }
}
{ 
   print pl+0,$0; p=$0
}' file

OR

awk -v FS="" 'p{
     pl=0; 
     for(i=1;i<=NF; i++)
     if(substr(p,i,1)==$i){ pl++ }else { break }
}
{ 
   print pl+0,$0; p=$0
}' file

Input

$ cat file
#to
#top
/0linyier
/10000001659/item/1097859586891251/
/10000001659/item/1191085827568626/
/10000121381/item/890759920974460/
/10000154478/item/1118425481552267/
/10897504949/pic/89875494927073741108975049493956/108987352826059/?lang=3
/1175332/item/10150825241495757/
/806123/item/10210653847881125/
/51927642128/item/488930816844251927642128/341878905879428/

Output

$ awk -v FS="" 'p{pl=0; split(p,a,r); for(i=1;i in a; i++)if(a[i]==$i){ pl++ }else { break }}{ print pl+0,$0; p=$0}' file
0 #to
3 #top
0 /0linyier
1 /10000001659/item/1097859586891251/
19 /10000001659/item/1191085827568626/
6 /10000121381/item/890759920974460/
7 /10000154478/item/1118425481552267/
3 /10897504949/pic/89875494927073741108975049493956/108987352826059/?lang=3
2 /1175332/item/10150825241495757/
1 /806123/item/10210653847881125/
1 /51927642128/item/488930816844251927642128/341878905879428/

Explanation

awk -v FS="" '                                  # call awk set field sep=""
       p{
           pl=0;                                # reset variable pl
           split(p,a,r);                        # split variable p
           for(i=1;i in a; i++)                 # loop through array
                 if(a[i]==$i){                  # check array element with current field
                     pl++                       # if matched then increment pl
                 }else { 
                     break                      # else its over break loop
                 }
        }
        { 
            print pl+0,$0;                      # print count, and current record
            p=$0                                # store current record in variable p
        }
     ' file

Note that the standards say that the results are unspecified if an empty string is assigned to FS. Some versions of awk will produce the output showed above in your example. The version of awk on OS/X issues the warning and output.

awk: field separator FS is empty

So the special meaning of setting FS to an empty string, does not work in every awk.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Correct, the behavior produced by setting FS to the null string is undefined by POSIX so any awk can do whatever it likes with it and still be POSIX compliant. GNU awk (and some others?) chooses to split on characters given that setting which can be useful. – Ed Morton Mar 13 '17 at 16:40
1

There's no builtin will do that for you but rather than going 1 character at a time you could compare half of each string at a time in a kind of binary search, something like (half-assed awk pseudo-code):

prev     = curr
lgthPrev = lgthCurr
curr     = $0
lgthCurr = length(curr)
partLgth = (lgthPrev > lgthCurr ? lgthCurr : lgthPrev)
while ( got strings to work with ) {
    partCurr = substr(curr,1,partLgth)
    partPrev = substr(prev,1,partLgth)
    if ( partCurr == partPrev ) {
        # add on half of the rest of each string and try again
        partLgth = partLgth * 1.5
    }
    else {
        # subtract half of these strings and try again
        partLgth = partLgth * 0.5
    }
}

Exit the above loop when you have no more sub-strings to compare and at that point the result is either:

  1. The 2 substrings matched on the previous iteration so that previous string length is the max length of matching substrings, or
  2. The 2 substrings never matched so there is no partial match between the 2 strings.

That will use potentially far fewer iterations than a char-by-char comparison but as written it's doing a string rather than char comparison on every iteration so idk what the net performance result will be. You could speed it up by doing a character rather than string comparison first on every iteration and only do a string comparison if the characters match at the current position:

prev     = curr
lgthPrev = lgthCurr
curr     = $0
lgthCurr = length(curr)
partLgth = (lgthPrev > lgthCurr ? lgthCurr : lgthPrev)
while ( got strings to work with ) {
    if ( substr(curr,partLgth,1) == substr(prev,partLgth,1) )
        isMatch = (substr(curr,1,partLgth) == substr(prev,1,partLgth) ? 1 : 0)
    }
    else {
        isMatch = 0
    }
    if ( isMatch ) 
        # add on half of the rest of each string and try again
        partLgth = partLgth * 1.5
    }
    else {
        # subtract half of these strings and try again
        partLgth = partLgth * 0.5
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • You seem to be optimising something that may well already be fast enough – Borodin Mar 13 '17 at 16:26
  • The OP in his question said he had a solution that involved going 1 character at a time and asked for a faster approach since that would be too slow (I am trying to work in perl by unpacking the strings into characters and counting till first mismatch but I wonder if there is some not too slow method) so not sure where you're coming from with that statement. – Ed Morton Mar 13 '17 at 16:34
  • Ah I see. I didn't read that to mean that they already had a solution. Maybe you're right. The slow part of working with individual characters is the split which has to create an array and a number of scalar variables. – Borodin Mar 13 '17 at 16:45
0

A perl script:

#!/usr/bin/perl -ln
$c = [ unpack "C*" ]; #current record
$i = 0;
$i++ while $p->[$i] == $c->[$i]; # count till mismatch
print "$i $_";
$p = $c               #save current record for next time

Same thing without command line flags:

#!/usr/bin/perl
while (<>) {
    chomp;
    $c = [ unpack "C*" ];
    $i = 0;
    $i++ while $p->[$i] == $c->[$i];
    print "$i $_\n";
    $p = $c
}

Same thing as a one-liner:

perl -lne '$c=[unpack "C*"]; $i=0; $i++ while $p->[$i] == $c->[$i]; print "$i $_"; $p = $c'

Pass the file(s) containing the lines as argument(s) or pipe the data into the command.

On my actual data, This runs about as fast as Borodin's solution:

$ xzcat href.xz |wc -l
33150
$ time xzcat href.xz | ./borodin.pl >borodin.out

real    0m2.437s
user    0m2.684s
sys     0m0.080s
$ time xzcat href.xz | ./pk.pl > pk.out 

real    0m2.305s
user    0m2.564s
sys     0m0.088s
$ diff pk.out borodin.out 
| improve this answer | |
0

In awk:

$ awk -F '' '{n=split(p,a,"");for(i=1;i<=(NF<n?NF:n)&&a[i]==$i;i++);print --i,$0; p=$0}' file
0 #to
3 #top
0 /0linyier
1 /10000001659/item/1097859586891251/
19 /10000001659/item/1191085827568626/
6 /10000121381/item/890759920974460/
7 /10000154478/item/1118425481552267/
3 /10897504949/pic/89875494927073741108975049493956/108987352826059/?lang=3
2 /1175332/item/10150825241495757/
1 /806123/item/10210653847881125/
1 /51927642128/item/488930816844251927642128/341878905879428/

Explained:

awk -F '' '{                                # each char on its own field
    n=split(p,a,"")                         # split prev record p each char in own a cell
    for(i=1;i<=(NF<n?NF:n)&&a[i]==$i;i++);  # compare while $i == a[i]
    print --i,$0                            # print comparison count (--fix)
    p=$0                                    # store record to p(revious)
}' file
| improve this answer | |
  • Ok, so mine turned out to resemble @AkshayHegde's solutions (++ for excellent taste, I wasn't peeking :) combined with some differencies so I dare to leave this here anyway. Comments to his solution about FS are valid for this solution as well. – James Brown Mar 13 '17 at 20:11
-1

You could do it directly with gawk. Here, it just compares the current line with the previous one and counts the number of common leading characters:

BEGIN{
    prev="";
}
{
    curr=$1;
    n = length(curr);
    m = length(prev);
    s = n<m?n:m;
    cnt = 0;
    for(i = 1;i <= s;i++){
        if(substr(curr, i, 1) == substr(prev, i, 1)){
            cnt++;
        }else{
            break;
        }
    }
    print(cnt, curr);

    prev=curr;
}
| improve this answer | |

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