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I am having what appears to be indentation issues in the Python Interactive Shell IDLE for Python version 3.3 64 bit on a Windows 7 Professional 64bit computer. This is the idea behind simple conditional flow program I am trying to write:

if spam == 1:
    print('Hello')
elif spam == 2:
    print('Howdy')
else:
    print('Greetings!")

The interactive shell is not letting the "elif" return to the same block (not sure if I am describing that correctly) as the if statement, so it ends up looking like this:

if spam == 1:
    print('Hello')
elif spam == 2:

SyntaxError: invalid syntax
if spam == 1:
    print('Hello')
    elif spam == 2:

SyntaxError: unindent does not match any outer indentation level
>>> 

PLEASE HELP.

  • 2
    Recommendation: don't write code in the interactive shell. Write it in a code window and then test it in the shell. Writing structured code in the interactive IDLE shell is a pain and the time spent in fixing indentation errors due to it just isn't worth it. The editor in an IDLE code window handles indentation in a much saner way. – John Coleman Mar 13 '17 at 23:39
  • The only syntax problem in your code is the mismatched quotation marks in 'Greetings!". You're also missing a definition for spam. With those problems fixed, this runs. – Prune Mar 13 '17 at 23:42
  • 1
    I mostly just type simple statements at the >>> prompt. I have a couple of scratch files that I usually use for anything more than, say, 3 lines. Since I use them frequently, they are usually listed in and easily accessed via the Recent Files list. – Terry Jan Reedy Mar 14 '17 at 0:26
  • Are you taking a class that forces 3.3? There have been numerous bug fixes and enhancements to IDLE since then. – Terry Jan Reedy Mar 14 '17 at 0:27
  • @TerryJanReedy The idea of a scratch file is a good one which might not occur to many newbies. It took me over a year of Python programming to hit upon the idea. Before I did so, I tended to write anything that I didn't intend to keep in the shell but sometimes ran into the same issues that OP faces. Now I just use my handy test.py which is typically #2 or 3 on my recent files list. – John Coleman Mar 14 '17 at 0:37
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The interactive shell's prompt, >>>, does take up space visually, but it is not considered code. Code at the same indentation level as a line that includes a prompt should begin where the prompt begins, not where your code begins.

>>> if 1==1:
    pass
else:
    pass

>>> 

If you start the interpreter from your system's terminal (e.g. cmd, PowerShell, etc.), there is a different prompt, ..., for subsequent lines in a block, providing a clearer representation of your code:

>>> if 1==1:
...     pass
... else:
...     pass
...
>>>

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