10

Basically, I have a user mode program that calls kernel32.CreateProcessA() which internally calls kernel32.CreateProcessInternalW(). Within this function, I'm interested in what is happening inside ntdll.NtCreateSection() which attempts to map the executable in virtual memory. Once in this function, the program quickly sets up the kernel call as EAX=0x32 and executes the SYSENTER instruction.

Obviously I can't see beyond the call gate in a user mode debugger. I have a little experience debugging kernel-mode drivers, so I loaded a copy of XP SP3 in a VMWare window and used VirtualKD to conect the pipe to the WinDbg (which I happen to be running inside IDA). After connecting the kernel debugger, I copied my user-mode EXE program and PDB onto the virtual machine, but I'm kind of at a loss on how to set the initial breakpoint in my user-mode program properly. I don't want to intercept all calls to the equivalent ntdll.ZwCreateSection() which I believe to be on the other side of the call gate. Ideally, I'd like to break into the user-mode code and step through that call gate now that I'm using a Kernel debugger, but I don't know what the first steps are.

I've done some googling and I've come close by setting a "ntsd -d" value in

HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Image File Execution Options\myprocess.exe

This causes a break in the kernel debugger when I start my process, but I can't seem to set any breakpoints following the .breakin command I need to issue to IDA to get to the WinDbg prompt. I've been following this guide where I locate my process with !process then switch to the context, and reload the symbols but I'm having problems setting the breakpoint in my process or advancing past the initial breakpoint set by "ntsd -d". After getting the message that the breakpoint could not be resolved and a deferred breakpoint is added, I cannot seem to advance "into" to the process without clearing the breakpoints if that makes any sense. Here's the stack of where I seem to be at when I hit that initial break:

ChildEBP RetAddr  
b2b55ccc 8060e302 nt!RtlpBreakWithStatusInstruction
b2b55d44 8053d638 nt!NtSystemDebugControl+0x128
b2b55d44 7c90e4f4 nt!KiFastCallEntry+0xf8
0007b270 7c90de3c ntdll!KiFastSystemCallRet
0007b274 6d5f5ca6 ntdll!ZwSystemDebugControl+0xc
0007bd48 6d5f6102 dbgeng!DotCommand+0xd0d
0007de8c 6d5f7077 dbgeng!ProcessCommands+0x318
0007dec4 6d5bec6c dbgeng!ProcessCommandsAndCatch+0x1a
0007eedc 6d5bed4d dbgeng!Execute+0x113
0007ef0c 010052ce dbgeng!DebugClient::Execute+0x63
0007ff3c 010069fb ntsd!MainLoop+0x1ec
0007ff44 01006b31 ntsd!main+0x10e
0007ffc0 7c817067 ntsd!mainCRTStartup+0x125
0007fff0 00000000 kernel32!BaseProcessStart+0x23

To be honest, I'm not sure my PDB is being loaded but I suspect its probably not my immediate problem; my modules pane is only showing kernel driver modules, not user mode modules. When I had been doing driver debugging in the past, I could see my driver image in this pane and whether or not the symbols had loaded, so I'm not sure what to expect for a user-mode image. Without the image, I can't really expect the debugger to resolve any breakpoints.

I realize I may be going about this completely wrong but I'm not having any luck searching for how to do user-mode/kernel-mode hybrid debugging. Is there anyone out there that could point me in the right direction so I can step into this kernel mode function from a specific user-mode process? Or, at least set a proper kernel-mode breakpoint so it is only triggered as a result of my particular user-mode process?

UPDATE: I loaded my module (happens to be named runlist.exe) in a user-mode debugger on the debugged OS (I happened to use OllyDbg). Once I was paused at a user-mode breakpoint only a couple instructions from SYSENTER, I suspended the OS using the kernel debugger. I then set the process context. The WinDbg command window contents were as follows:

WINDBG>!process 0 0 runlist.exe

PROCESS 820645a8  SessionId: 0  Cid: 01b4    Peb: 7ffd7000  ParentCid: 02b0
    DirBase: 089c02e0  ObjectTable: e1671bb0  HandleCount:   8.
    Image: runlist.exe

WINDBG>.process /i /r /p 820645a8
You need to continue execution (press 'g' <enter>) for the context
to be switched. When the debugger breaks in again, you will be in
the new process context.
WINDBG>g
This command cannot be passed to the WinDbg plugin directly, please use IDA Debugger menu to achieve the same result.
Break instruction exception - code 80000003 (first chance)
WINDBG>.reload /user
Loading User Symbols
....
Caching 'Modules'... ok
WINDBG>lmu
start    end        module name
00400000 00405000   runlist  C (no symbols)           
7c340000 7c396000   MSVCR71    (private pdb symbols)  g:\symcache\msvcr71.pdb\630C79175C1942C099C9BC4ED019C6092\msvcr71.pdb
7c800000 7c8f6000   kernel32   (pdb symbols)          e:\windows\symbols\dll\kernel32.pdb
7c900000 7c9af000   ntdll      (pdb symbols)          e:\windows\symbols\dll\ntdll.pdb
WINDBG>bp 0x7c90d16a
WINDBG>bl
 0 e 7c90d16a     0001 (0001) ntdll!ZwCreateSection+0xa

Although I couldn't get my process' symbols to load with ".reload" (PDB is in the same directory - might need to copy it to my symbols dir), the breakpoint I care about is in ntdll anyway so I set it on the address 0x7C90D16A which the debugger recognized as being within ntdll.ZwCreateSection(). Oddly to me, in user-mode code this address resolves to ntdll.NtCreateSection(), but either way that breakpoint was only 2 instructions from where I had my user-mode break. When I resumed the machine, my intention was to "run" the user-mode debugged-process and this would trigger the kernel-mode breakpoint 2 instructions away. The kernel breakpoint was never hit and the app resumed past this point. I can however set a breakpoint on ntdll!ZwCreateSection() but then when resuming the OS, the breakpoint is repeatedly hit by other processes preventing me from getting back to the user-mode debugger so I can "run" it to that location only within my own process.

UPDATE Merging the tips provided by @conio, the following steps worked for me:

1> after attaching kernel debugger and booting target OS, suspend the OS and apply some configuration options:

!gflag +ksl         //allow sxe to report user-mode module load events under kernel debugger
sxe ld myproc.exe   //cause kernel debugger break upon process load
.sympath+ <path>    //path to HOST machine's user-mode app's symbols

2> run debugger to resume target OS

3> on the target, run the EXE we want to debug

4> kernel debugger should break; now enter the following commands to switch to the usermode context:

!process 0 0 myproc.exe                 //get address of EProcess structure (first number on 1st line after "PROCESS")
.process /i /r /p <eprocess*>           //set kernel debugger to process context
g                                       //continue execution to allow the context switch; debugger will break after switch complete
.reload /user                           //reload user symbols
lmu                                     //ensure you have symbols although not really necessary in my particular case

5> now since I already know what happens in the user-mode side of ntdll.NtCreateSection(), I just went ahead and set a breakpoint for the kernel mode side of that function, but specifying that I want the breakpoint to occur only within the context of my process. This way, the breakpoint is not triggered OS wide:

bu /p <eprocess*> nt!NtCreateSection        //set breakpoint in kernel side of function
g                                           //run to break

6> if all goes as planned, the breakpoint will wake up the debugger on the kernel mode side of NtCreateSection(). I appreciate all the responses and tips!

  • The link herein is broken now. – Ryan Prescott Feb 7 at 16:29
  • 1
    @RyanPrescott: Was the link this? – ahmd0 Jun 11 at 22:55
  • Looks like it, thanks! – Ryan Prescott Aug 6 at 14:56
8

There are two ways to combine user-mode debugging with kernel-mode debugging and you're confusing and mixing them up.

The way you tried is to use the kernel-mode debugger to debug kernel-mode code, use the user-mode debugger (ntsd) to debug user-mode code, and control the user-mode debugger running on the target machine from the kernel debugger. That's what the -d flag to ntsd does. This method is described in the Controlling the User-Mode Debugger from the Kernel Debugger page and its subpages on MSDN.

What this does (more or less) is to redirect ntsd input and output to the kernel debugger. The modules pane - as the rest of the windows in WinDbg - belong to the kernel debugger. Your only interaction with the user-mode debugger is through the tunnel the kernel debugger creates, and you can access it only through the command window. This is documented in the documentation for the -d flag:

-d

        Passes control of this debugger to the kernel debugger. If you are debugging CSRSS, this control redirection always is active, even if -d is not specified. (This option cannot be used during remote debugging -- use -ddefer instead.) See Controlling the User-Mode Debugger from the Kernel Debugger for details. This option cannot be used in conjunction with either the -ddefer option or the -noio option.

        Note  If you use WinDbg as the kernel debugger, many of the familiar features of WinDbg are not available in this scenario. For example, you cannot use the Locals window, the Disassembly window, or the Call Stack window, and you cannot step through source code. This is because WinDbg is only acting as a viewer for the debugger (NTSD or CDB) running on the target computer.

The second way, which is the one used in the link you put, is to use the kernel debugger to debug both kernel-mode code and user-mode code. No user-mode debugger. No ntsd. You said you've followed the guide, but in fact you didn't. If you had, there wouldn't be any ntsd.

I suggest you use this method for start, and after you use the user-mode debugger only if you find out you need to ( because you want to use a user-mode extension, for example).

In order for the kernel debugger to work well with user-mode modules you have to enable the Enable loading of kernel debugger symbols GlobalFlag. Use !gflag +ksl to do that.

Once you do that, break on the loading of your process using sxe ld:runlist, set the breakpoint (possibly with the /p option) and debug whatever it is that you want.

Just do that instead of all the ntsd mess.

  • Thanks for the clarification! Esp. the "sxe ld:<myprocess>" tip to break on module load allowing me to bypass a user-mode debugger on target as well as that "ntsd -d" registry setting. Now there's only one thing I cannot yet figure out. I can now step through through the user-mode code in the kernel debugger but I'd like to either step through the SYSENTER or set a breakpoint on the other side in kernel mode at either the interrupt handler or the function that the interrupt handler calls to work the magic of NtCreateSection. I can't seem to find concrete examples for this technique. – byteptr Mar 14 '17 at 23:06
  • 1
    You can't really "step into" a sysenter. The easiest thing to do would be to set or enable a breakpoint on the corresponding nt function. Usually they have the same name. When you get into ntdll!NtCreateSection, do bu nt!NtCreateSection and go. You can try and use the /p or /t options with the bu, but be warned that they don't always work well. – conio Mar 15 '17 at 0:27
  • @conio ntsd -d isn't a mess i edited my post to show how to do it – blabb Mar 16 '17 at 12:54
  • @blabb: It is. It has practically no advantages over debugging user-mode code directly from the kernel debugger or using remote debugging like a normal human being (nstd -noio -remote, possibly with -ddefer instead of -noio) and lots of disadvantages. Your answer was bad and now is even worse. As usual, it has a very low ratio of information per character. Please don't use the comments section of my answer to try and draw attention to your bad answer. – conio Mar 18 '17 at 21:01
3

Use ntsd -d and start debugging the executabke from target with a kd connection you can use the kd as an usermode debugger as well as kernel debugger read the docs several times it is not easy doing it furst time but over several trials you should get the hang of it read about .breakin etc

How to break on the entry point of a program when debug in kernel mode with windbg?

edited to add a demo for using ntsd -d

setup

1 ) a vm running winxp sp3 and windbg version 6.12 installed in it    
2 ) _NT_SYMBOL_PATH in vm is set to z:\   
3 ) z:\ is a mapped network drive that points to e:\symbols in host   
4 ) host running win 7 sp2    
5 ) host windbg 10.0010586      

starting an application in vm under ntsd and redirecting it to kd

opened a command prompt in vm navigated to windbg installation directory and issued ntsd -s -d calc -s is to disable lazy symbol loading

0:000> version
version
Windows XP Version 2600 (Service Pack 3) UP Free x86 compatible
Product: WinNt, suite: SingleUserTS
kernel32.dll version: 5.1.2600.5512 (xpsp.080413-2111)
Machine Name:
Debug session time: Thu Mar 16 16:44:29.222 2017 
System Uptime: 0 days 0:10:12.941
Process Uptime: 0 days 0:01:40.980
  Kernel time: 0 days 0:00:01.632
  User time: 0 days 0:00:00.040
Live user mode: <Local>

Microsoft (R) Windows Debugger Version 6.12.0002.633 X86
Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

command line: 'ntsd -s -d calc'  Debugger Process 0xA8 
dbgeng:  image 6.12.0002.633, built Tue Feb 02 01:38:31 2010
[path C:\Documents and Settings\admin\Desktop\Debugging Tools for Windows (x86)\dbgeng.dll]

windbg breaks on SystemBreakPoint and the Debug prompt is Input:\>
lm shows the symbol was loaded from z:\

CommandLine: calc
Symbol search path is: z:\
Executable search path is: 
ModLoad: 01000000 0101f000   calc.exe
xxxxx
ntdll!DbgBreakPoint:
7c90120e cc              int     3
0:000> lm
lm
start    end        module name
01000000 0101f000   calc       (pdb symbols)          z:\calc.pdb\3B7D84101\calc.pdb
77c10000 77c68000   msvcrt     (export symbols)       C:\WINDOWS\system32\msvcrt.dll

Executing till AddressOfEntryPoint

0:000> g @$exentry
g @$exentry

calc!WinMainCRTStartup:
01012475 6a70            push    70h

Setting a breakpoint in user mode and its counterpart in kernel mode at once

0:000> bp ntdll!ZwCreateSection  <--- user mode bp notice prompt 0:000
bp ntdll!ZwCreateSection


0:000> .breakin  <<---- transferring to kd mode 
.breakin
Break instruction exception - code 80000003 (first chance)
nt!RtlpBreakWithStatusInstruction:
804e3592 cc              int     3


kd> !process 0 0 calc.exe   <<----- looking for our process of interest
Failed to get VAD root
PROCESS ffae2020  SessionId: 0  Cid: 0410    Peb: 7ffde000  ParentCid: 00a8
    DirBase: 04d87000  ObjectTable: e1bd5238  HandleCount:  26.
    Image: calc.exe

kd> bp /p ffae2020 nt!NtCreateSection  << setting a kernel mode bp    
on counterpart that matches with our process of interest notice prompt kd> 


kd> g  <<<---- return to user mode  after setting a breakpoint
0:000> g   <<<<<---------  executing in user mode 
g

now calc process is running in usermode in the vm click help about (this will trigger a Loadlib and that needs a Section so we will break on our user mode bp in the kernel debugger )

Breakpoint 0 hit
eax=00000000 ebx=00000000 ecx=00000001 edx=ffffffff esi=0007f368 edi=00000000
eip=7c90d160 esp=0007f22c ebp=0007f2a8 iopl=0         nv up ei pl zr na pe nc
cs=001b  ss=0023  ds=0023  es=0023  fs=003b  gs=0000             efl=00000246
ntdll!NtCreateSection:
7c90d160 b832000000      mov     eax,32h

now we can merrily trace around use t trace not p or g or any other execution commands

0:000> t
t
eax=00000032 ebx=00000000 ecx=00000001 edx=ffffffff esi=0007f368 edi=00000000
eip=7c90d165 esp=0007f22c ebp=0007f2a8 iopl=0         nv up ei pl zr na pe nc
cs=001b  ss=0023  ds=0023  es=0023  fs=003b  gs=0000             efl=00000246
ntdll!ZwCreateSection+0x5:
7c90d165 ba0003fe7f      mov     edx,offset SharedUserData!SystemCallStub (7ffe0300)
0:000> 

eax=00000032 ebx=00000000 ecx=00000001 edx=7ffe0300 esi=0007f368 edi=00000000
eip=7c90d16a esp=0007f22c ebp=0007f2a8 iopl=0         nv up ei pl zr na pe nc
cs=001b  ss=0023  ds=0023  es=0023  fs=003b  gs=0000             efl=00000246
ntdll!ZwCreateSection+0xa:
7c90d16a ff12    call dword ptr [edx] ds:0023:7ffe0300={ntdll!KiFastSystemCall (7c90e4f0)}
0:000> 

eax=00000032 ebx=00000000 ecx=00000001 edx=7ffe0300 esi=0007f368 edi=00000000
eip=7c90e4f0 esp=0007f228 ebp=0007f2a8 iopl=0         nv up ei pl zr na pe nc
cs=001b  ss=0023  ds=0023  es=0023  fs=003b  gs=0000             efl=00000246
ntdll!KiFastSystemCall:
7c90e4f0 8bd4            mov     edx,esp
0:000> 

eax=00000032 ebx=00000000 ecx=00000001 edx=0007f228 esi=0007f368 edi=00000000
eip=7c90e4f2 esp=0007f228 ebp=0007f2a8 iopl=0         nv up ei pl zr na pe nc
cs=001b  ss=0023  ds=0023  es=0023  fs=003b  gs=0000             efl=00000246
ntdll!KiFastSystemCall+0x2:
7c90e4f2 0f34            sysenter
0:000> 

Breakpoint 1 hit
nt!NtCreateSection:
805652b3 6a2c            push    2Ch

when in bp at kernel .reload and see the stack trace

the 2nd stack trace is same as first but with corrected symbols for Shell32.dll (vm doesnt have internet access so it fails for first time so i drag dropped that specific dll from vm and fetched its sumbols from host using windbg -z shell32.dll and .reload (since the downstore in host is network mappped in vm the second trace properly loads the pdb and gives a correct stack trace without warnings

kd> kb
 # ChildEBP RetAddr  Args to Child              
00 f8bb1d40 804de7ec 0007f368 0000000f 00000000 nt!NtCreateSection
01 f8bb1d40 7c90e4f4 0007f368 0000000f 00000000 nt!KiFastCallEntry+0xf8
02 0007f224 7c90d16c 7c91c993 0007f368 0000000f ntdll!KiFastSystemCallRet
03 0007f228 7c91c993 0007f368 0000000f 00000000 ntdll!NtCreateSection+0xc
04 0007f2a8 7c91c64a 0007f340 00000790 0007f300 ntdll!LdrpCreateDllSection+0x92
05 0007f388 7c91624a 000add00 0007f414 0007f93c ntdll!LdrpMapDll+0x28f
06 0007f648 7c9164b3 00000000 000add00 0007f93c ntdll!LdrpLoadDll+0x1e9
07 0007f8f0 7c801bbd 000add00 0007f93c 0007f91c ntdll!LdrLoadDll+0x230
08 0007f958 7c801d72 7ffddc00 00000000 00000000 kernel32!LoadLibraryExW+0x18e
09 0007f96c 7ca625a3 7ca625ac 00000000 00000000 kernel32!LoadLibraryExA+0x1f
WARNING: Stack unwind information not available. Following frames may be wrong.
0a 0007f990 010057b8 000700ac 000a7c84 00000000 SHELL32!SHCreateQueryCancelAutoPlayMoniker+0x2062d
0b 0007fbc4 010041ac 0000012e 00000111 01006118 calc!MenuFunctions+0x15d
0c 0007fcb4 01004329 0000012e 00000111 01006118 calc!RealProcessCommands+0x1b61
0d 0007fcdc 01006521 0000012e 0007fd6c 01006118 calc!ProcessCommands+0x2d
0e 0007fd04 7e418734 000700ac 00000111 0000012e calc!CalcWndProc+0x409
0f 0007fd30 7e418816 01006118 000700ac 00000111 USER32!InternalCallWinProc+0x28
10 0007fd98 7e4189cd 00000000 01006118 000700ac USER32!UserCallWinProcCheckWow+0x150
11 0007fdf8 7e418a10 0007fee8 00000000 0007ff1c USER32!DispatchMessageWorker+0x306
12 0007fe08 010021a7 0007fee8 7c80b731 000a1ee4 USER32!DispatchMessageW+0xf
13 0007ff1c 010125e9 000a7738 00000055 000a7738 calc!WinMain+0x256
14 0007ffc0 7c817067 00000000 00000000 7ffde000 calc!WinMainCRTStartup+0x174
15 0007fff0 00000000 01012475 00000000 78746341 kernel32!BaseProcessStart+0x23

STACKtrace without warnings

Breakpoint 0 hit
nt!NtCreateSection:
805652b3 6a2c            push    2Ch
kd> kb
 # ChildEBP RetAddr  Args to Child              
00 f8aa0d40 804de7ec 0007f368 0000000f 00000000 nt!NtCreateSection
01 f8aa0d40 7c90e4f4 0007f368 0000000f 00000000 nt!KiFastCallEntry+0xf8
02 0007f224 7c90d16c 7c91c993 0007f368 0000000f ntdll!KiFastSystemCallRet
03 0007f228 7c91c993 0007f368 0000000f 00000000 ntdll!NtCreateSection+0xc
04 0007f2a8 7c91c64a 0007f340 00000790 0007f300 ntdll!LdrpCreateDllSection+0x92
05 0007f388 7c91624a 000add00 0007f414 0007f93c ntdll!LdrpMapDll+0x28f
06 0007f648 7c9164b3 00000000 000add00 0007f93c ntdll!LdrpLoadDll+0x1e9
07 0007f8f0 7c801bbd 000add00 0007f93c 0007f91c ntdll!LdrLoadDll+0x230
08 0007f958 7c801d72 7ffdfc00 00000000 00000000 kernel32!LoadLibraryExW+0x18e
09 0007f96c 7ca625a3 7ca625ac 00000000 00000000 kernel32!LoadLibraryExA+0x1f
0a 0007f97c 7ca62e8e 003800dd 000a7c84 00000000 SHELL32!GetXPSP1ResModuleHandle+0x16
0b 0007f990 010057b8 000900ac 000a7c84 00000000 SHELL32!ShellAboutW+0x1f
0c 0007fbc4 010041ac 0000012e 00000111 01006118 calc!MenuFunctions+0x15d
0d 0007fcb4 01004329 0000012e 00000111 01006118 calc!RealProcessCommands+0x1b61
0e 0007fcdc 01006521 0000012e 0007fd6c 01006118 calc!ProcessCommands+0x2d
0f 0007fd04 7e418734 000900ac 00000111 0000012e calc!CalcWndProc+0x409
10 0007fd30 7e418816 01006118 000900ac 00000111 USER32!InternalCallWinProc+0x28
11 0007fd98 7e4189cd 00000000 01006118 000900ac USER32!UserCallWinProcCheckWow+0x150
12 0007fdf8 7e418a10 0007fee8 00000000 0007ff1c USER32!DispatchMessageWorker+0x306
13 0007fe08 010021a7 0007fee8 7c80b731 000a1ee4 USER32!DispatchMessageW+0xf
14 0007ff1c 010125e9 000a7738 00000055 000a7738 calc!WinMain+0x256
15 0007ffc0 7c817067 00000000 00000000 7ffda000 calc!WinMainCRTStartup+0x174
16 0007fff0 00000000 01012475 00000000 78746341 kernel32!BaseProcessStart+0x23

dump the arguments to NtCreateSection

kd> dds @esp l8
f8bb1d44  804de7ec nt!KiFastCallEntry+0xf8
f8bb1d48  0007f368
f8bb1d4c  0000000f
f8bb1d50  00000000
f8bb1d54  00000000
f8bb1d58  00000010
f8bb1d5c  01000000 calc!_imp__RegOpenKeyExA <PERF> (calc+0x0)
f8bb1d60  00000790

we know the seventh argument is HANDLE according to prototype of DDI

    NTSTATUS ZwCreateSection(
      _Out_    PHANDLE            SectionHandle,
      _In_     ACCESS_MASK        DesiredAccess,
      _In_opt_ POBJECT_ATTRIBUTES ObjectAttributes,
      _In_opt_ PLARGE_INTEGER     MaximumSize,
      _In_     ULONG              SectionPageProtection,
      _In_     ULONG              AllocationAttributes,
      _In_opt_ HANDLE             FileHandle
    );

kd> !handle 790

Failed to get VAD root
PROCESS ffae2020  SessionId: 0  Cid: 0410    Peb: 7ffde000  ParentCid: 00a8
    DirBase: 04d87000  ObjectTable: e1bd5238  HandleCount:  29.
    Image: calc.exe

Handle table at e1bd5238 with 29 entries in use

0790: Object: 8124b028  GrantedAccess: 00100020 Entry: e1032f20
Object: 8124b028  Type: (8127b900) File
    ObjectHeader: 8124b010 (old version)
        HandleCount: 1  PointerCount: 1
        Directory Object: 00000000  Name: \WINDOWS\system32\xpsp1res.dll {HarddiskVolume1}

return back to user mode from kernel mode and inspect the new Section Handle

kd> g
eax=00000000 ebx=00000000 ecx=00000001 edx=ffffffff esi=0007f368 edi=00000000
eip=7c90d16c esp=0007f22c ebp=0007f2a8 iopl=0         nv up ei pl zr na pe nc
cs=001b  ss=0023  ds=0023  es=0023  fs=003b  gs=0000             efl=00000246
ntdll!ZwCreateSection+0xc:
7c90d16c c21c00          ret     1Ch

checking the return value of HANDLE in user mode

0:000> dd 7f368 l1
dd 7f368 l1
0007f368  0000078c
0:000> !handle 78c
!handle 78c
Handle 78c
  Type          Section
0:000> !handle 78c f
!handle 78c f
Handle 78c
  Type          Section
  Attributes    0
  GrantedAccess 0xf:
         None
         Query,MapWrite,MapRead,MapExecute
  HandleCount   2
  PointerCount  3
  Name          <none>
  Object Specific Information
    Section base address 0
    Section attributes 0x1800000
    Section max size 0x2f000
0:000> 

If not satisifed we can revert to kd set the process context and check the returned handle in kernel mode

kd> !handle 78c f

Failed to get VAD root
PROCESS ffae2020  SessionId: 0  Cid: 0410    Peb: 7ffde000  ParentCid: 00a8
    DirBase: 04d87000  ObjectTable: e1bd5238  HandleCount:  30.
    Image: calc.exe

Handle table at e1bd5238 with 30 entries in use

078c: Object: e1088f30  GrantedAccess: 0000000f Entry: e1032f18
Object: e1088f30  Type: (8128b900) Section
    ObjectHeader: e1088f18 (old version)
        HandleCount: 1  PointerCount: 1

now if you continue execution you can see the loaded library dbgprint in windbg and the about dialog in vm :)

kd> g
0:000> g
g
ModLoad: 10000000 1002f000   C:\WINDOWS\system32\xpsp1res.dll

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