40

I was wondering if its possible when creating an abstract class with abstract methods if its possible to allow the implementations of those methods in the derived classes to have different amounts of parameters for each function.

I currently have for my abstract class

from abc import ABCMeta, abstractmethod

class View(metaclass=ABCMeta):
    @abstractmethod
    def set(self):
        pass

    @abstractmethod
    def get(self):
        pass

But I want to be able to implement it in one class with set having 1 parameter and get having 2 (set(param1) and get(param1, param2)), and then in another class also inherit it but have 0 parameters for set and 2 for get (set() and get(param1, param2)).

Is this possible and if so how would I go about doing it

1
  • 4
    While you can do that, that's a really weird thing to do. The semantics of an abstract method almost always include the parameters it should take. You may want to reconsider whether this abstract method or abstract class actually make sense. Commented Mar 14, 2017 at 6:28

3 Answers 3

63

No checks are done on how many arguments concrete implementations take. So there is nothing stopping your from doing this already.

Just define those methods to take whatever parameters you need to accept:

class View(metaclass=ABCMeta):
    @abstractmethod
    def set(self):
        pass

    @abstractmethod
    def get(self):
        pass


class ConcreteView1(View):
    def set(self, param1):
        # implemenation

    def get(self, param1, param2):
        # implemenation


class ConcreteView2(View):
    def set(self):
        # implemenation

    def get(self, param1, param2):
        # implemenation
8
  • 18
    ohk it must just be pep8 in pycharm telling me off then thank you
    – 1seanr
    Commented Mar 14, 2017 at 6:26
  • 7
    Isn't there any way that does not lead to a warning?
    – matheburg
    Commented Jul 20, 2019 at 11:07
  • 7
    @MartijnPieters Signature of method '...' does not match signature of base method in class '...' is shown by PyCharm at least. Looks like this is some PyCharm internal warning, not PEP8, see e.g. this example. So let's reformulate my question: if one is warned about this, what would be a best practice design pattern for that case?
    – matheburg
    Commented Jul 21, 2019 at 8:11
  • 2
    @matheburg: don't change your method signatures, at least not the required components. Use optional arguments to extend (so keyword arguments).
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented Jul 21, 2019 at 11:31
  • 3
    @daniel451: The answer addresses the technicalities of the Python abc module and the specific call signatures the OP used in their question. I try to stick to the Liskov substitution principle in my own work, so I'd not use positional parameters in this case.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented Mar 5, 2021 at 12:39
11

python 3.8

from abc import ABC, abstractmethod


class SomeAbstractClass(ABC):
    @abstractmethod
    def get(self, *args, **kwargs):
        """
        Returns smth
        """

    @abstractmethod
    def set(self, key, value):
        """
        Sets smth
        """

class Implementation(SomeAbstractClass):
    def set(self, key, value):
        pass

    def get(self, some_var, another_one):
        pass

Works perfectly, no warnings, no problems

2
  • 3
    and what if the Implementation class has some children class and that class calls get method ? the error I am getting is something is like this W0221: Number of parameters was 2 in 'BaseSetter.create' and is now 4 in overridden 'DocumentsTotalsSetter.create' method (arguments-differ)
    – rickster
    Commented May 20, 2022 at 18:38
  • I would say that you should not do this at least it does not look pythonic from my perspective. If a method has different signature in every descendant you should extract common functionality and reorganise logic. But its just my personal opinion. If you show the code I can say more
    – n0nSmoker
    Commented Jun 14, 2022 at 12:17
0

Mhh. with current provided answer I still get type hinting errors Also, is not really SOLID because, in a way the Abstract class is still have a signature that, doesn't not correspond to the sub-child. Or better, one could break it especially if you call it super so really PyCharm (at least is what I'm using) is right giving the warning

This solution is probably more SOLID and has 0 warning on IDE. Because you are allowing any parameter in the Abstract class it would never throw an error if someone would call super AND is very explicit if someone is only looking at the Abstract class that is telling you:

"This method allows anything, please let the child implements as it please" whereas by not puting any parameter, one is obliged to see and understand the sub-classes to undertand the intention. Abstract class should be intendent to be a "protocol" and undertandable by looking at the abstract class, not the child inheriting

In terms of Typing is same thign, we are addding 'Any' is in "whatever you want"

import typing as t
from abc import ABC, abstractmethod


class ViewAbstract(ABC):
    @abstractmethod
    def set(self, *_: t.Any, **__: t.Any) -> t.Any: ...

    @abstractmethod
    def get(self, *_: t.Any, **__: t.Any) -> t.Any: ...


class ConcreteView1(ViewAbstract):

    def set(self, data: dict) -> bool:
        print(f"Setting data {data}")
        return True

    def get(self) -> dict:
        return {"data": "Hello World"}


class ConcreteView2(ViewAbstract):

    def set(self, key: str, data: dict) -> bool:
        print(f"Setting key {key} data {data}")
        return True

    def get(self) -> list:
        return [{"data": "Hello World"}]


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