1

I'm trying to create and fill a file in a directory that requires sudo permission.

EDIT: It seems that based on tested the suggested similar post.

sudo su -c "echo 'put in file' > file_name"
echo "Some text" | sudo tee /etc/file

will both create a file within the directory that requires sudo permission

  • 3
    can't reproduce that – hek2mgl Mar 15 '17 at 13:22
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    What is the exact output? tee should create the destination file for you. – Attie Mar 15 '17 at 13:23
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    If you don't have /etc that would explain it, but this seems unreproducible on any reasonably regular system. – tripleee Mar 15 '17 at 13:26
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    Are you sure you actually tested with the exact command? If you ran sudo tee /etc/some/file, and /etc/some didn't exist, that would have the behavior described. sudo tee /etc/file, by contrast, is a completely legitimate way to escalate privileges used to write to /etc/file. I'd suggest reproducing the issue with set -x enabled, and incorporating that exact, unedited log into the question. – Charles Duffy Mar 15 '17 at 13:44
  • Ahh! Thank you for editing in your actual command; that makes this answerable. – Charles Duffy Mar 15 '17 at 13:49
5

The question has been edited to include a log of the problem being introduced, which includes the command:

# Taken from edited question
$ echo 'hello' > sudo tee /data/hello

In bash (which allows redirection operators at any point in a simple command), this is precisely equivalent to running:

# From question, with redirection moved to end to make actual behavior more readable
echo 'hello' tee /data/hello > sudo

That is, it's creating a file named sudo in your current directory, not using sudo to run tee (in the above, tee is just an argument to echo).

What you want, by contrast, is:

# CORRECT: Using a pipe, not a redirection
echo 'hello' | sudo tee /data/hello

with a pipe (|) rather than a >.

0

Assuming you have the required sudo privileges you could use an editor like vi or nano

sudo vi /etc/file

or

sudo nano /etc/file

If you don't have sudo for those programs you can su to root first and then try:

sudo su -

vi /etc/file

or

nano /etc/file
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    These aren't necessary. tee does create destination files. – Charles Duffy Mar 15 '17 at 13:43
  • (and see the OP's edit to the question, adding the actual command they ran -- which makes the problem clear). – Charles Duffy Mar 15 '17 at 13:53
  • Ha ! I did get confused there for a second ! :--) – GreensterRox Mar 15 '17 at 14:01
0

If you want to do it all on one command line, you can make sure that the file exists by running touch(1) on it. E.g.

sudo touch /etc/file && echo "Some text" | sudo tee /etc/file

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    Not necessary. tee opens its output file with O_CREAT flag, and so will create the file if it doesn't exist -- you can check that with strace if you like. – Charles Duffy Mar 15 '17 at 13:43
  • (and see the OP's edit to the question, adding the actual command they ran -- which makes the problem clear). – Charles Duffy Mar 15 '17 at 13:49
  • Yup, that makes more sense, thanks. – vielmetti Mar 16 '17 at 14:44

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