6

This is what i am trying to achive

i have :

    #image1 {
    position: absolute;
    bottom: 0px;
    align-self: auto;
    background-color: #dc022e;
    width: 340px;
    height: 100px;
    border-radius: 50% / 100%;
    border-bottom-left-radius: 0;
    /*transform: rotate(10deg);*/
    border-bottom-right-radius: 0;
    opacity: 0.8;
    }
    
    #image2 img {
    width: 80%;
    }
<div>
  <div id="image2">
    <img src="http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcThtVuIQ7CBYssbdwtzZjVLI_uw09SeLmyrxaRQEngnQAked5ZB">
  </div>
  <div id="image1"></div>
</div>

Finally I don't know how to make it rotated and with the margins cut like in the picture

3

A Quick example of this would use a pseudo element and have the image set in the background.

div {
  position: relative;
  height: 300px;
  width: 500px;
  background: url(http://lorempixel.com/500/300);/*image path*/
  overflow: hidden;/*hides the rest of the circle*/
}

div:before {
  content: "";
  position: absolute; /*positions with reference to div*/
  top: 100%;
  left: 50%;
  width: 0;/*define value if you didn't want hover*/
  height: 0;
  border-radius: 50%;
  background: tomato;/*could be rgba value (you can remove opacity then)*/
  opacity: 0.5;
  transform: translate(-50%, -50%);/*ensures it is in center of image*/
  transition: all 0.4s;
}


/*Demo Only*/
div:hover:before {/*place this in your pseudo declaration to remove the hover*/
  height: 100%;
  width: 150%;/*this makes the shape wider than square*/
  transform: translate(-50%, -50%) rotate(5deg);/*ensures it is in center of image + rotates*/
}
div {/*This stuff is for the text*/
  font-size: 40px;
  line-height: 300px;
  text-align: center;
}
<div>HOVER ME</div>

  • We have essentially the same answer... therefore a +1 cannot be prevented ^_^ Yours is just fancier... >_> – Christoph Mar 15 '17 at 17:52
3

Instead of nested elements, you can just use a pseudo element. This is placed at the bottom of the container div. For this to work, you need position:relative and overflow:hidden on the container div. Also, pseudo elements always need the content declaration.

To modify the border radius, you just play around with left | width | height of the pseudo element. You don't need any rotation.

Instead of hex color and opacity you can as well use the "new" color space rgba(r,g,b,a) where a is the opacity value.

For the passepartout you simply use the border declaration.

#image2{
    position:relative;
    border:10px solid #888;
    overflow:hidden;
    box-shadow:0 0 4px #aaa;
}

#image2::after {
    content:"";
    display:block;
    position: absolute;
    bottom: 0;left:-10%;
    background-color: #dc022e;
    width: 120%;
    height: 60%;
    border-radius: 100% 100% 0 0;
    opacity: 0.8;
}
    
#image2 img {
    width: 100%;
    display:block;
    position:relative;
}
<div id="image2">
    <img src="http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcThtVuIQ7CBYssbdwtzZjVLI_uw09SeLmyrxaRQEngnQAked5ZB">
  </div>

  • You might want to use a % height on the pseudo otherwise it'll not be as responsive as it potentially is. – jbutler483 Mar 15 '17 at 17:48
  • 1
    @jbutler483 Thanks for pointing this out! Changed it accordingly. – Christoph Mar 15 '17 at 17:50
1

You can just use position: absolute for your image and position: relative for your overlay, adjusting the top position and width according to your needs. Here's a Fiddle. Hope this helps!

Edit: Here's an updated version of the Fiddle demonstrating border and overflow properties on the img container. As CBroe mentioned, rotating a circle is probably not a good use of your time in this case. Also, I definitely agree that using a pseudo element is a much cleaner approach than nesting images.

  • i get it but that still not gets me the effect that i want ( see image example ) i need to rotate it and make it seen its like it just part o a bigger circle – johnnyshrewd Mar 15 '17 at 17:34
  • if for instance i make the shape bigger if will just do that ...i would like to make it bigger and let he parent cut it – johnnyshrewd Mar 15 '17 at 17:36
  • 1
    No, you don't need to rotate anything - rotating a circle is pointless, it looks the same no matter how much you "rotate" it. And to make it bigger and show only part of it, you just need to play with the size and position. Add overflow:hidden to the container to cut off the parts of the circle that would go outside. – CBroe Mar 15 '17 at 17:40

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