46

Objective-C declares a class function, initialize(), that is run once for each class, before it is used. It is often used as an entry point for exchanging method implementations (swizzling), among other things.

Swift 3.1 deprecates this function with a warning:

Method 'initialize()' defines Objective-C class method 'initialize', which is not guaranteed to be invoked by Swift and will be disallowed in future versions

How can this be resolved, while still maintaining the same behaviour and features that I currently implement using the initialize() entry point?

12
  • To be more precise, the method +initialize is executed before anything in the class is used. In reality it is executed, when the bundle that contains the class is loaded, what can happen after app start. Mar 16, 2017 at 5:10
  • @AminNegm-Awad: I am not sure if that is correct. Perhaps you are thinking of the load method (which isn't available in Swift)?
    – Martin R
    Mar 16, 2017 at 8:09
  • It is the same for +initialize. The runtime sends initialize to each class in a program just before the class, or any class that inherits from it, is sent its first message from within the program. There is no guarantee that this is done at program start. Such a guarantee would cause an immediate load of all bundles to get the code in +initialize. – The difference to +load is, that it is executed on classes and categories. (Methods with the same selector in class and categorie!) But, of course, the fact of the possible late invocation is more important for categories than classes. Mar 16, 2017 at 8:27
  • @AminNegm-Awad: Perhaps I misunderstood your first comment. You said that in reality, initialize is called when the bundle ... is loaded. That is not what I experienced.
    – Martin R
    Mar 16, 2017 at 8:35
  • 1
    Yes, as I said hours ago. But it matters sometimes, i. e. in the case I mentioned. However, it is not guaranteed that it is sent to the class object (in Objective-C there are no member functions like initialize() and they are not called, but messages are sent) at app start. Mar 16, 2017 at 12:54

10 Answers 10

35

Easy/Simple Solution

A common app entry point is an application delegate's applicationDidFinishLaunching. We could simply add a static function to each class that we want to notify on initialization, and call it from here.

This first solution is simple and easy to understand. For most cases, this is what I'd recommend. Although the next solution provides results that are more similar to the original initialize() function, it also results in slightly longer app start up times. I no longer think it is worth the effort, performance degradation, or code complexity in most cases. Simple code is good code.

Read on for another option. You may have reason to need it (or perhaps parts of it).


Not So Simple Solution

The first solution doesn't necessarily scale so well. And what if you are building a framework, where you'd like your code to run without anyone needing to call it from the application delegate?

Step One

Define the following Swift code. The purpose is to provide a simple entry point for any class that you would like to imbue with behavior akin to initialize() - this can now be done simply by conforming to SelfAware. It also provides a single function to run this behavior for every conforming class.

protocol SelfAware: class {
    static func awake()
}

class NothingToSeeHere {

    static func harmlessFunction() {

        let typeCount = Int(objc_getClassList(nil, 0))
        let types = UnsafeMutablePointer<AnyClass>.allocate(capacity: typeCount)
        let autoreleasingTypes = AutoreleasingUnsafeMutablePointer<AnyClass>(types)
        objc_getClassList(autoreleasingTypes, Int32(typeCount))
        for index in 0 ..< typeCount { (types[index] as? SelfAware.Type)?.awake() }
        types.deallocate(capacity: typeCount)

    }

}

Step Two

That's all good and well, but we still need a way to actually run the function we defined, i.e. NothingToSeeHere.harmlessFunction(), on application startup. Previously, this answer suggested using the Objective-C code to do this. However, it seems that we can do what we need using only Swift. For macOS or other platforms where UIApplication is not available, a variation of the following will be needed.

extension UIApplication {

    private static let runOnce: Void = {
        NothingToSeeHere.harmlessFunction()
    }()

    override open var next: UIResponder? {
        // Called before applicationDidFinishLaunching
        UIApplication.runOnce
        return super.next
    }

}

Step Three

We now have an entry point at application startup, and a way to hook into this from classes of your choice. All that is left to do: instead of implementing initialize(), conform to SelfAware and implement the defined method, awake().

23
  • 2
    The elegant solution in Swift works by using the mechanism of Objective-C? Mar 16, 2017 at 5:07
  • 6
    Well, it is the nature of +initialize that it is self-contained. That's what it is for. Any other approach isn't a solution at all instead of being an inelegant solution. And I do not think that it is a port. If it would be a port from Objective-C, it would work without Objective-C. But it doesn't. Don't get me wrong, I upvoted your answer. However, it is not an elegant solution, but a hack, because there is no way to do that in Swift. Mar 16, 2017 at 5:49
  • 2
    @AminNegm-Awad I would suggest that the elegance comes from the unchanged behaviour to the outside user. For a Framework or something similar that relies on the magic of initialize(), this allows behaviour to remain unchanged. You are right about my previous comment, doing this doesn't meet the definition of a software 'port'. Perhaps 'bridge' would be a better word. Mar 16, 2017 at 9:34
  • 1
    I think the notion of falling back on Objective-C is highly regrettable. If I'd wanted to do that I wouldn't have gone through all the work of converting my application to Swift.
    – matt
    Mar 31, 2017 at 2:33
  • 1
    @AminNegm-Awad You left out Cocoa Bindings. I just converted a desktop application that makes heavy use of bindings from Objective-C to Swift, and darned near drove myself crazy. :)
    – matt
    Apr 3, 2017 at 2:45
7

My approach is essentially the same as adib's. Here's an example from a desktop application that uses Core Data; the goal here is to register our custom transformer before any code mentions it:

@NSApplicationMain
class AppDelegate: NSObject, NSApplicationDelegate {

    override init() {
        super.init()
        AppDelegate.doInitialize
    }

    static let doInitialize : Void = {
        // set up transformer
        ValueTransformer.setValueTransformer(DateToDayOfWeekTransformer(), forName: .DateToDayOfWeekTransformer)
    }()

    // ...
}

The nice thing is that this works for any class, just as initialize did, provided you cover all your bases — that is, you must implement every initializer. Here's an example of a text view that configures its own appearance proxy once before any instances have a chance to appear onscreen; the example is artificial but the encapsulation is extremely nice:

class CustomTextView : UITextView {

    override init(frame: CGRect, textContainer: NSTextContainer?) {
        super.init(frame:frame, textContainer: textContainer)
        CustomTextView.doInitialize
    }

    required init?(coder aDecoder: NSCoder) {
        super.init(coder:aDecoder)
        CustomTextView.doInitialize
    }

    static let doInitialize : Void = {
        CustomTextView.appearance().backgroundColor = .green
    }()

}

That demonstrates the advantage of this approach much better than the app delegate does. There is only one app delegate instance, so the problem isn't very interesting; but there can be many CustomTextView instances. Nevertheless, the line CustomTextView.appearance().backgroundColor = .green will be executed only once, as the first instance is created, because it is part of the initializer for a static property. That is very similar to the behavior of the class method initialize.

7
  • I wonder if the optimizing compiler would be allowed to not initialize the static property since CustomTextView.doInitialize evaluates to an unused expression – just a thought, I have no idea if this is an issue or not.
    – Martin R
    Aug 22, 2017 at 15:00
  • @MartinR Well, if that were the case, wouldn't that same worry haunt the standard dispatch-once replacement pattern?
    – matt
    Aug 22, 2017 at 15:05
  • dispatch_once executes a block exactly once. Here the "once" part is a side-effect of the initialization of the static property. – The Swift migrator converts dispatch_once to _ = MyClass.__once (as e.g. here: stackoverflow.com/q/39576848/1187415). Could the assignment to _ be required?
    – Martin R
    Aug 22, 2017 at 15:22
  • @MartinR All I can tell you is that my value transformer initialization has never in fact failed. That's from a real application that I launch every day.
    – matt
    Aug 22, 2017 at 15:52
  • OK, thanks. It was just a thought and I might be on a wrong track completely.
    – Martin R
    Aug 22, 2017 at 17:18
5

If you want to fix your Method Swizzling in Pure Swift way:

public protocol SwizzlingInjection: class {
    static func inject()
}

class SwizzlingHelper {

    private static let doOnce: Any? = {
        UILabel.inject()
        return nil
    }()

    static func enableInjection() {
        _ = SwizzlingHelper.doOnce
    }
}

extension UIApplication {

    override open var next: UIResponder? {
        // Called before applicationDidFinishLaunching
        SwizzlingHelper.enableInjection()
        return super.next
    }

}

extension UILabel: SwizzlingInjection
{
    public static func inject() {
        // make sure this isn't a subclass
        guard self === UILabel.self else { return }

        // Do your own method_exchangeImplementations(originalMethod, swizzledMethod) here

    }
}

Since the objc_getClassList is Objective-C and it cannot get the superclass (e.g. UILabel) but all the subclasses only, but for UIKit related swizzling we just want to run it once on the superclass. Just run inject() on each target class instead of for-looping your whole project classes.

1
  • same issue for me : objc_getClassList tells me UILabel does not conform to my SwizzlingInjection protocol. Only (internal) UILabel subclasses seems to be conforming to this protocol... too bad... cannot loop on runtime classes to perform auto swizzling injection on conforming classes, need to manually inject swizzling for each needed class. That's why, to me, this answer should be the accepted one ^^
    – polo987
    Nov 28, 2018 at 9:35
3

A slight addition to @JordanSmith's excellent class which ensures that each awake() is only called once:

protocol SelfAware: class {
    static func awake()
}

@objc class NothingToSeeHere: NSObject {

    private static let doOnce: Any? = {
        _harmlessFunction()
    }()

    static func harmlessFunction() {
        _ = NothingToSeeHere.doOnce
    }

    private static func _harmlessFunction() {
        let typeCount = Int(objc_getClassList(nil, 0))
        let types = UnsafeMutablePointer<AnyClass>.allocate(capacity: typeCount)
        let autoreleasingTypes = AutoreleasingUnsafeMutablePointer<AnyClass>(types)
        objc_getClassList(autoreleasingTypes, Int32(typeCount))
        for index in 0 ..< typeCount { (types[index] as? SelfAware.Type)?.awake() }
        types.deallocate(capacity: typeCount)
    }
}
2

You can also use static variables since those are already lazy and refer them in your top-level objects' initializers. This would be useful for app extensions and the like which doesn't have an application delegate.

class Foo {
    static let classInit : () = {
        // do your global initialization here
    }()

    init() {
        // just reference it so that the variable is initialized
        Foo.classInit
    }
}
6
  • 3
    If you have to refer them in your top-level objects' initializers., why not directly call classInit()? Is there any advantage? This is not self-contained solution at all. Apr 3, 2017 at 1:47
  • In any case classInit should be internal to the class.
    – adib
    Apr 3, 2017 at 11:37
  • @AminNegm-Awad Directly call classInit() the code will be performed every time you create an instance of class Foo. That's not we want.
    – Eric Chai
    Apr 17, 2017 at 15:44
  • Actually private to that class should be better.
    – Eric Chai
    Apr 17, 2017 at 15:46
  • @EricChai An explicite call to classInit() will be executed, when it is called. Apr 18, 2017 at 10:28
1

If you prefer Pure Swift™! then my solution to this kind of thing is running at _UIApplicationMainPreparations time to kick things off:

@UIApplicationMain
private final class OurAppDelegate: FunctionalApplicationDelegate {
    // OurAppDelegate() constructs these at _UIApplicationMainPreparations time
    private let allHandlers: [ApplicationDelegateHandler] = [
        WindowHandler(),
        FeedbackHandler(),
        ...

Pattern here is I'm avoiding the Massive Application Delegate problem by decomposing UIApplicationDelegate into various protocols that individual handlers can adopt, in case you're wondering. But the important point is that a pure-Swift way to get to work as early as possible is dispatch your +initialize type tasks in the initialization of your @UIApplicationMain class, like the construction of allHandlers here. _UIApplicationMainPreparations time ought to be early enough for pretty much anybody!

2
  • Any way to do this for frameworks? (which doesn't have an app delegate).
    – adib
    Sep 10, 2017 at 2:41
  • Static class members as mentioned right below here are the best you can do in a framework, far as I know Sep 11, 2017 at 9:53
0
  1. Mark your class as @objc
  2. Inherit it from NSObject
  3. Add ObjC category to your class
  4. Implement initialize in category

Example

Swift files:

//MyClass.swift
@objc class MyClass : NSObject
{
}

Objc files:

//MyClass+ObjC.h
#import "MyClass-Swift.h"

@interface MyClass (ObjC)

@end

//MyClass+ObjC.m
#import "MyClass+ObjC.h"

@implement MyClass (ObjC)

+ (void)initialize {
    [super initialize];
}

@end
0

Here is a solution that does work on swift 3.1+

@objc func newViewWillAppear(_ animated: Bool) {
    self.newViewWillAppear(animated) //Incase we need to override this method
    let viewControllerName = String(describing: type(of: self)).replacingOccurrences(of: "ViewController", with: "", options: .literal, range: nil)
    print("VIEW APPEAR", viewControllerName)
}

static func swizzleViewWillAppear() {
    //Make sure This isn't a subclass of UIViewController, So that It applies to all UIViewController childs
    if self != UIViewController.self {
        return
    }
    let _: () = {
        let originalSelector = #selector(UIViewController.viewWillAppear(_:))
        let swizzledSelector = #selector(UIViewController.newViewWillAppear(_:))
        let originalMethod = class_getInstanceMethod(self, originalSelector)
        let swizzledMethod = class_getInstanceMethod(self, swizzledSelector)
        method_exchangeImplementations(originalMethod!, swizzledMethod!);
    }()
}

Then on AppDelegate:

UIViewController.swizzleViewWillAppear()

Taking from the following post

0

One more example to execute something once using a static closure stored property[About]

extension MyClass {

    static let shared: MyClass = {
        //closure

        //create an instance and setup it
        let myClass = MyClass(parameter: "parameter")
        myClass.initialize()

        return myClass
    }()
    //() to execute the closure.

    func initialize() {
        //is called once
    }
}

//using
let myClass = MyClass.shared

-4

I think that is a workaround way.

Also we can write initialize() function in objective-c code, then use it by bridge reference

Hope the best way.....

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