7

Well this is embarrassing... I'm trying to create a good reproducible pandas example by giving you guys a small sample of my dataset. I thought this would be simple with df.to_dict() but to no avail.

df2 = df1[['DATE_FILLED','DAYS_SUPPLY']].head(5)
df2['DATE_FILLED'] = pd.to_datetime(df2['DATE_FILLED'])
diction = df2.to_dict()

output:

{'DATE_FILLED': {0: Timestamp('2016-12-28 00:00:00'),
                 1: Timestamp('2016-12-31 00:00:00'), 
                 2: Timestamp('2016-12-20 00:00:00'), 
                 3: Timestamp('2016-12-21 00:00:00'), 
                 4: Timestamp('2016-12-26 00:00:00')}, 
     'DAYS_SUPPLY': {0: 14, 1: 14, 2: 14, 3: 7, 4: 7}}

But if the community were to convert it to a dataframe by using the text:

import pandas as pd
from datetime import datetime
import time
d= pd.DataFrame({'DATE_FILLED': [Timestamp('2016-12-28 00:00:00'), Timestamp('2016-12-31 00:00:00'), Timestamp('2016-12-20 00:00:00'), Timestamp('2016-12-21 00:00:00'), Timestamp('2016-12-26 00:00:00')], 'DAYS_SUPPLY': [14, 14, 14, 7, 7]})

They would get NameError: name 'Timestamp' is not defined. I've tried importing various things and even tried playing around with the different orients in pd.to_dict().

How do I either convert the Timestamps or better yet, create a DataFrame from them?

16

You need to import Timestamp from pandas:

>>> import pandas as pd
>>> from pandas import Timestamp
>>> d= pd.DataFrame({'DATE_FILLED': [Timestamp('2016-12-28 00:00:00'), Timestamp('2016-12-31 00:00:00'), Timestamp('2016-12-20 00:00:00'), Timestamp('2016-12-21 00:00:00'), Timestamp('2016-12-26 00:00:00')], 'DAYS_SUPPLY': [14, 14, 14, 7, 7]})
>>>
>>> d
  DATE_FILLED  DAYS_SUPPLY
0  2016-12-28           14
1  2016-12-31           14
2  2016-12-20           14
3  2016-12-21            7
4  2016-12-26            7
>>>

In the future, you can always use introspection to give you a good hint:

>>> ts = d.to_dict()['DATE_FILLED'][0]
>>> type(ts)
<class 'pandas.tslib.Timestamp'>
>>> from pandas.tslib import Timestamp
| improve this answer | |
6

You just need to import Timestamp:

from pandas import Timestamp

d = {'DATE_FILLED': {0: Timestamp('2016-12-28 00:00:00'),
                 1: Timestamp('2016-12-31 00:00:00'), 
                 2: Timestamp('2016-12-20 00:00:00'), 
                 3: Timestamp('2016-12-21 00:00:00'), 
                 4: Timestamp('2016-12-26 00:00:00')}, 
     'DAYS_SUPPLY': {0: 14, 1: 14, 2: 14, 3: 7, 4: 7}}



pd.DataFrame(d)
Out: 
  DATE_FILLED  DAYS_SUPPLY
0  2016-12-28           14
1  2016-12-31           14
2  2016-12-20           14
3  2016-12-21            7
4  2016-12-26            7
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Beat me by 17 seconds! – juanpa.arrivillaga Mar 16 '17 at 20:47
  • 2
    Instead of a third answer with identical content... I'll stick to upvoting ;-) Nice to see you answering questions. – piRSquared Mar 16 '17 at 20:47
  • I knew it was this simple... Couldn't find that in the docs anywhere – MattR Mar 16 '17 at 20:47
  • @juanpa.arrivillaga I actually looked at the question for a while and was surprised that nobody answered yet. :) – ayhan Mar 16 '17 at 20:48
  • 1
    @MattR check out my answer for how you could have discovered this easily yourself by checking the type object – juanpa.arrivillaga Mar 16 '17 at 20:53
2

import module doesn't enter the module's names into the global namespace, you have to access them via module.name. To enter the module's names into the global namespace, you need to use the from module import syntax. In this case, either from pandas import Timestamps, which enters Timestamps into the global namespace, or from pandas import *, which imports all of the names in pandas into the global namespace.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Thank you for the explanation! This will certainly help in the future – MattR Mar 16 '17 at 20:52

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