5

Let's suppose you are writing a C struct which represents a course in a meal. One of the fields in the course struct is of type:

enum TP_course {STARTER, MAINCOURSE, DESSERT};

Then, depending on the type of the course, you have a subtype:

enum TP_starter {SALAD, GRILLEDVEGETABLES, PASTA};
enum TP_maincourse {BEEF, LAMB, FISH};
enum TP_dessert {APPLEPIE, ICECREAM, MOUSSE};

Given that only one of such enums will be used at a time (depending on the type of the course), it makes sense to aggregate them in a union:

union U_subtype {
   enum TP_starter s;
   enum TP_maincourse m;
   enum TP_dessert d;
};

So the course struct would look like this:

struct S_course {
   enum TP_course type;
   union U_subtype stype;
   float price_in_USD;
   int availability;
   ...and all the rest of data would follow...
};

Ok, everything is clear, but... is there any coding strategy I could follow to try to enforce safe access to the stype tagged union above? Perhaps making it opaque in some way?

For example, if I write a switch/case block for an enum and I forget to write a case for a value, the compiler will trigger a warning, which is of great help for maintaining the code in the future. But if I access stype.s without first checking if type==STARTER, the compiler cannot be smart enough for realizing of the risky coding, and won't warn at all.

Can I organize the code in some way so that it's not possible to access the members of the U_subtype union except in a very limited place where I clearly document how the access to such members must be done?

4
  • Essentially, all the union members are effectively int, and the values of the different enum types act like int as well (their use isn't restricted to a specific enum type, just anywhere an int would work). Using the union with the three enum types helps illustrate your intent, though. – Dmitri Mar 16 '17 at 20:54
  • 1
    Please define "safe". C is weakly typed. If you need a guarantee, you should consider a different language, e.g. Python. – too honest for this site Mar 16 '17 at 21:01
  • 3
    The best method is to write functions for storing and accessing the members, and avoid accessing the members directly. The functions can do validity checks. – Barmar Mar 16 '17 at 21:10
  • 1
    It's not possible to enforce use of these functions in C. If you want more safety and data hiding, you need to switch to a language like C++. – Barmar Mar 16 '17 at 21:11
4

You can

  1. Hide the whole struct and expose accessor functions that act on a pointer

.

/* header */
struct S_course; //forward declaration
enum TP_starter {SALAD, GRILLEDVEGETABLES, PASTA};
enum TP_maincourse {BEEF, LAMB, FISH};
enum TP_dessert {APPLEPIE, ICECREAM, MOUSSE};
void S_course__set_starter(struct S_course *this,  enum TP_starter starter);

//accessor functions
void S_course__set_maincourse(struct S_course *this,  enum TP_maincourse maincourse);
void S_course__set_dessert(struct S_course *this,  enum TP_dessert dessert);


/* c file */
enum TP_course {STARTER, MAINCOURSE, DESSERT};
union U_subtype {
   enum TP_starter s;
   enum TP_maincourse m;
   enum TP_dessert d;
};
struct S_course {
   enum TP_course type;
   union U_subtype stype;
   float price_in_USD;
   int availability;
   /*...*/
};
void S_course__set_starter(struct S_course *this,  enum TP_starter starter)
{
    this->type = STARTER;
    this->stype.s = starter;
}
  1. Use member names that scream don't touch me, or a name like tagged_union, which should make it obvious how it needs to be accessed.

    or

  2. Switch to C++ and use its access control features (private/protected) to hide only some members while allowing access through public member/friend functions

3
  • How do you anticipate C++ access control solving this problem? All of the members of the struct and its member union need to be accessible under one circumstance or another, and as far as I know, C++ access control is static, not data-dependent. Similar applies to naming, for that matter. – John Bollinger Mar 16 '17 at 21:30
  • @JohnBollinger By allowing you to hide members selectively. If you hide the problematic members, there's no way to access them except via member functions. In plain C, hiding is all or nothing, AFAIK. – PSkocik Mar 16 '17 at 21:35
  • Ok, but then the main point seems any way around to be "provide accessor functions and prevent direct access to members". Your answer reads as if alternatives (2) and (3) are intended to suggest something altogether different, as opposed to merely being different flavors of the "prevent direct access" part. – John Bollinger Mar 16 '17 at 21:49
2

After thinking a lot about this, I chose an approach which could be considered as a fourth option in addition to the other three suggested by PSkocik: To redesign the struct so that there's no type and subtype, but just subtype. Then the type isn't provided by the struct, but by a helper function.

Something like this:

enum TP_course {STARTER, MAINCOURSE, DESSERT};
enum TP_subtype {SALAD, GRILLEDVEGETABLES, PASTA, 
                 BEEF, LAMB, FISH, APPLEPIE, ICECREAM, MOUSSE};

struct S_course {
   enum TP_subtype stype;
   float price_in_USD;
   int availability;
   /*...*/
};

enum TP_course getCourse(struct S_course *c) {
switch(c->stype) {
   case SALAD:
   case GRILLEDVEGETABLES:
   case PASTA:
      return STARTER;
   case BEEF:
   case LAMB:
   case FISH:
      return MAINCOURSE;
   case APPLEPIE:
   case ICE-CREAM:
   case MOUSSE:
      return DESSERT;
   }
}

This design guarantees safe read/write access to the type of the struct. It prevents you from leaving the struct in undefined behavior (for example, setting the type to STARTER but forgetting to set the subtype accordingly), and it also prevents you from reading (and writing) a union member that it's not the current one.

I tend to prefer this style of designs, and I admit I got this influence from the Apple UI guidelines: create a design that prevents the user from entering unsupported/undefined data; never spread data in different places when it can be in one single place; avoid absurd/illegal data status from the design so that you don't need to check if data is legal: it always is; avoid special cases whenever you can do the same with a single general case; etc, etc, etc...

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