28

In TypeScript, is there a syntax for declaring a field as lazily-initialized?

Like there is in Scala, for example:

lazy val f1 = new Family("Stevens")

Meaning that the field initializer would only run when the field is first accessed.

8
  • 1
    you may be need to write a decorator to support that.like:@lazy val f1 = new Family("Stevens").
    – holi-java
    Mar 16, 2017 at 22:13
  • Interesting, thanks. Upvoted. Anything like that ready-made somewhere? E.g. in Angular 2?
    – KarolDepka
    Mar 16, 2017 at 22:15
  • 1
  • @MaciejBukowski inspired by you,and I'm change my decorator that could be inherited correctly.I'll update my answer,please help me to see that every test is right in the test section?
    – holi-java
    Mar 16, 2017 at 23:37
  • @holi-java I deleted my comment because I found myself wrong ;) I tested the decorators in TS with your first version and TS is replacing the original method in the prototype with the decorated one, once the program starts, so there aren't any time or memory run-time issues. But I'll run your tests to be sure :) Mar 17, 2017 at 0:59

4 Answers 4

33

I would use a getter:

class Lazy {
  private _f1;

  get f1() {
    return this._f1 || (this._f1 = expensiveInitializationForF1());
  }

}

Yes, you could address this with a decorator, but that might be overkill for simple cases.

5
  • 1
    There's a small typo - should be return this._f1. But I like your solution for the simplicity. Mar 17, 2017 at 2:33
  • 2
    You have to put the assignment in parentheses, typescript complains about a missing semicolon after the second this._f1 otherwise
    – msrd0
    Sep 1, 2019 at 11:47
  • 1
    Today, you should probably go for ?? instead of ||: return this._f1 ?? this._f1 = expensiveInitializationForF1();. This avoid running the initialization if _f1 is initialized but has a falsy value. Jun 19, 2020 at 8:42
  • With new private class fields recently shipped in ECMAScript, you can use #f1 instead of private _f1 for true privacy.
    – axmrnv
    Aug 28, 2020 at 9:36
  • These days one should replace || with ?? to better handle certain values like zero.
    – KarolDepka
    Jan 17 at 23:25
13

I find it can't using @lazyInitialize in typescript for yourself.so you must rewrite that.here is my decorator,you just to copy and use it.using @lazy on a getter not a property instead.

@lazy

const {defineProperty, getPrototypeOf}=Object;
export default function lazy(target, name, {get:initializer, enumerable, configurable, set:setter}: PropertyDescriptor={}): any {
    const {constructor}=target;
    if (initializer === undefined) {
        throw `@lazy can't be set as a property \`${name}\` on ${constructor.name} class, using a getter instead!`;
    }
    if (setter) {
        throw `@lazy can't be annotated with get ${name}() existing a setter on ${constructor.name} class!`;
    }

    function set(that, value) {
        if (value === undefined) {
            value = that;
            that = this;
        }
        defineProperty(that, name, {
            enumerable: enumerable,
            configurable: configurable,
            value: value
        });
        return value;
    }

    return {
        get(){
            if (this === target) {
                return initializer;
            }
            //note:subclass.prototype.foo when foo exists in superclass nor subclass,this will be called
            if (this.constructor !== constructor && getPrototypeOf(this).constructor === constructor) {
                return initializer;
            }
            return set(this, initializer.call(this));
        },
        set
    };
}

Test

describe("@lazy", () => {
    class Foo {
        @lazy get value() {
            return new String("bar");
        }

        @lazy
        get fail(): string {
            throw new Error("never be initialized!");
        }

        @lazy get ref() {
            return this;
        }
    }


    it("initializing once", () => {
        let foo = new Foo();

        expect(foo.value).toEqual("bar");
        expect(foo.value).toBe(foo.value);
    });

    it("could be set @lazy fields", () => {
        //you must to set object to any
        //because typescript will infer it by static ways
        let foo: any = new Foo();
        foo.value = "foo";

        expect(foo.value).toEqual("foo");
    });

    it("can't annotated with fields", () => {
        const lazyOnProperty = () => {
            class Bar {
                @lazy bar: string = "bar";
            }
        };

        expect(lazyOnProperty).toThrowError(/@lazy can't be set as a property `bar` on Bar class/);
    });

    it("get initializer via prototype", () => {
        expect(typeof Foo.prototype.value).toBe("function");
    });

    it("calling initializer will be create an instance at a time", () => {
        let initializer: any = Foo.prototype.value;

        expect(initializer.call(this)).toEqual("bar");
        expect(initializer.call(this)).not.toBe(initializer.call(this));
    });

    it("ref this correctly", () => {
        let foo = new Foo();
        let ref: any = Foo.prototype.ref;

        expect(this).not.toBe(foo);
        expect(foo.ref).toBe(foo);
        expect(ref.call(this)).toBe(this);
    });

    it("discard the initializer if set fields with other value", () => {
        let foo: any = new Foo();
        foo.fail = "failed";

        expect(foo.fail).toBe("failed");
    });

    it("inherit @lazy field correctly", () => {
        class Bar extends Foo {
        }

        const assertInitializerTo = it => {
            let initializer: any = Bar.prototype.ref;
            let initializer2: any = Foo.prototype.ref;
            expect(typeof initializer).toBe("function");
            expect(initializer.call(it)).toBe(it);
            expect(initializer2.call(it)).toBe(it);
        };

        assertInitializerTo(this);
        let bar = new Bar();
        assertInitializerTo({});
        expect(bar.value).toEqual("bar");
        expect(bar.value).toBe(bar.value);
        expect(bar.ref).toBe(bar);
        assertInitializerTo(this);
    });


    it("overriding @lazy field to discard super.initializer", () => {
        class Bar extends Foo {
            get fail() {
                return "error";
            };
        }

        let bar = new Bar();

        expect(bar.fail).toBe("error");
    });

    it("calling super @lazy fields", () => {
        let calls = 0;
        class Bar extends Foo {
            get ref(): any {
                calls++;
                //todo:a typescript bug:should be call `super.ref` getter  instead of super.ref() correctly in typescript,but it can't
                return (<any>super["ref"]).call(this);
            };
        }

        let bar = new Bar();

        expect(bar.ref).toBe(bar);
        expect(calls).toBe(1);
    });

    it("throws errors if @lazy a property with setter", () => {
        const lazyPropertyWithinSetter = () => {
            class Bar{
                @lazy
                get bar(){return "bar";}
                set bar(value){}
            }
        };


        expect(lazyPropertyWithinSetter).toThrow(/@lazy can't be annotated with get bar\(\) existing a setter on Bar class/);

    });
});
5
  • Hmm. I'm using TS@2.2.1 and only return super.ref works for me, which is correct here. Mar 17, 2017 at 1:21
  • because you set compilerOptions target to es6,that I have tested,in es5 it is can't be called super getters.
    – holi-java
    Mar 17, 2017 at 1:22
  • Yep. You're right. But if I choose es5 target none of the them works for me :D I'm getting [ts] Only public and protected methods of the base class are accessible via the 'super' keyword. and [ts] Cannot invoke an expression whose type lacks a call signature. Type 'Bar' has no compatible call signatures. Mar 17, 2017 at 1:28
  • Yes,I found some new situations,I'll updated my answer again.
    – holi-java
    Mar 17, 2017 at 1:33
  • may be I think that is wrong,I think @lazy on a getter that existing a setter will cause the setter with invalid behavior.@lazy can do it by set:setter||set, but I just disable this feature by throw an exception
    – holi-java
    Mar 17, 2017 at 2:20
4

Modern version, classes:

class Lazy<T> {
  private #f: T | undefined;
  constructor(#init: () => T) {}
  public get f(): T {
    return this.#f1 ??= this.#init();
  }
}

Modern version, inline:

let value;
// …
use_by_ref(value ??= lazy_init());

Potential future version, with proxies, that doesn't currently work because returning a different value from a constructor is usually considered as undefined behavior.

class Lazy<T> {
  constructor(private init: { [K in keyof T]: () => T[K] }) {
    let obj = Object.fromEntries(Object.keys(init).map(k => [k, undefined])) as unknown as { [K in keyof T]: undefined | T[K] };
    Object.seal(obj);
    return new Proxy(obj, this);
  }
  get<K extends keyof T>(t: T, k: K): T[K] {
    return t[k] ??= this.init[k];
  }
}

Can probably simplify more.

1

I'm using something like this:

export interface ILazyInitializer<T> {(): T}

export class Lazy<T> {
private instance: T | null = null;
private initializer: ILazyInitializer<T>;

 constructor(initializer: ILazyInitializer<T>) {
     this.initializer = initializer;
 }

 public get value(): T {
     if (this.instance == null) {
         this.instance = this.initializer();
     }

     return this.instance;
 }
}



let myObject: Lazy<MyObject>;
myObject = new Lazy(() => <MyObject>new MyObject("value1", "value2"));
const someString = myObject.value.getProp;

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.