-1

Is there an actual difference between

if statement:

and

if statement == True:

Aside from the first one being shorter, does one have a higher precedence, or is one slower?

EDIT:

I realized this may not have been clear, but statement is usually statement = True.

marked as duplicate by TigerhawkT3 python Mar 20 '17 at 21:29

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  • Never write it the second way! – user177800 Mar 17 '17 at 22:29
7

Those are not equal. Python allows you to define if statements over a large range of elements. You can for instance write:

if []: # is False
    pass
if 1425: # is True
    pass
if None: # is False
    pass

Basically if you write if <expr>, Python will evaluate the truthness of the expression. This is predefined for numbers (int, float, complex, not being equal to zero), some builtin collections (list, dict, not being empty), and you can define a __bool__ or __len__ on an arbitrary object yourself. You can get the truthness of an object by calling bool(..) on it. For example bool([]) == False.

Example where if x is not equal to if x == True:

For instance:

if 0.1:
    pass # will take this branch
else:
    pass

will take the if branch, whereas:

if 0.1 == True:
    pass
else:
    pass # will take this branch

will not take the if branch. This is because a number is equal to True if it is one (1, 1L, 1+0j,...). Whereas bool(x) for a number is True if x is non-zero.

It is also possible to define an object where == will raise an exception. Like:

class Foo:

    def __eq__(self,other):
        raise Exception()

Now calling Foo() == True will result in:

>>> Foo() == True
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 3, in __eq__
Exception

It is however not advisable to raise exceptions in the __eq__ function (well I strongly advice against it anyway).

It however holds that: if <expr>: is equivalent to if bool(<expr>):.

Given the two are equal, evidently the <expr> == True will be slower since you do an extra call to __eq__, etc.

Furthermore it is usually more idiomatic to check if a collection is empty with:

some_list = []

if some_list: # check if the list is empty
    pass

This is also more safe since if it possible that some_list is None (or another kind of collection), you still check whether it holds at least one element, so changing your mind a bit will not have dramatic impact.

So if you have to write if x == True, there is usually something weird with the truthness of the x itself.

Some background on truthness:

As is specified in the documentation (Python-2.x/Python-3.x). There is a way to resolve truthness.

In , it is evaluated like (over-simplified version, more "pseudo Python" code to explain how it works):

# Oversimplified (and strictly speaking wrong) to demonstrate bool(..)
# Only to show what happens "behind the curtains"
def bool(x):
    if x is False or x is None:
        return False
    if x == 0 or x == 0.0 or x == 0L or x == 0j:
        return False
    if x is () or x == [] or x == '' or x == {}:
        return False
    if hasattr(x,'__nonzero__'):
        y = x.__nonzero__()
        return y != 0 and y != False
    if hasattr(x,'__len__'):
        return x.__len__() != 0
    return True

and an over-simplified version for :

# Oversimplified (and strictly speaking wrong) to demonstrate bool(..)
# Only to show what happens "behind the curtains"
def bool(x):
    if x is False or x is None:
        return False
    if x == 0 or x == 0.0 or x == 0j:
        return False
    if x is () or x == [] or x == '' or x == {}:
        return False
    if hasattr(x,'__bool__'):
        return x.__bool__() is True
    if hasattr(x,'__len__'):
        return x.__len__() != 0
    return True
  • So using if statement == True is better in that it only evaluates True/False? – MasterHolbytla Mar 17 '17 at 22:25
  • 4
    No, idiomatic you write if some_list: to check if the some_list holds elements. Usually the truthness of an object makes sense and thus it is better to use that one. – Willem Van Onsem Mar 17 '17 at 22:26
  • 2
    It's probably worth mentioning - when compared to numbers, True == 1, and bool(x) is x.__nonzero__() or x.__bool__() for Py2/Py3 – TemporalWolf Mar 17 '17 at 22:32
  • Sorry, I misread the post. Thanks! – MasterHolbytla Mar 17 '17 at 22:33
  • 1
    @TemporalWolf: That is indeed an excellent idea, I've provided some "truthness" definitions in pseudo-code Python-code. – Willem Van Onsem Mar 17 '17 at 22:47
2

if statement: evaluates to true as long as statement is truthy (an int not equal to '0', True, a list with at least one element, a dict with one key, value pair ..etc).

if statement == True: only evaluates to true if statement is True, i.e

>>> print(statement)
True
  • 2
    Or if statement is 1, 1.0, 1+0j, Fraction(1, 1), or anything else numerically equal to 1. – dan04 Mar 17 '17 at 22:22

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