As the default SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS collation of SQL server can't differentiate between ss and ß, I want to change the collation of a specific column in a table to SQL_Latin1_General_CP437_BIN2, as advised in here.

However, I am not sure whether this is generally a good practice or not. Also I am not sure about the implications other than the following:

  • Changing the sort order: As I am never sorting the data on this column, it might not be a problem for me. However, if you think otherwise, please let me know.
  • Changing case-insensitivity to case-sensitivity: As my application always provide text in lowercase, I think this change will also not be a problem for me. However, if you think otherwise, please let me know.

I am curious about the other major implications of this change, if any.

Additionally, I would also like to know which one of the following would be a most suited for this scenario:

SQL_Latin1_General_CP437_BIN

Description: Latin1-General, binary sort for Unicode Data, SQL Server Sort Order 30 on Code Page 437 for non-Unicode Data


SQL_Latin1_General_CP437_BIN2

Description: Latin1-General, binary code point comparison sort for Unicode Data, SQL Server Sort Order 30 on Code Page 437 for non-Unicode Data


SQL_Latin1_General_CP850_BIN

Description: Latin1-General, binary sort for Unicode Data, SQL Server Sort Order 40 on Code Page 850 for non-Unicode Data


SQL_Latin1_General_CP850_BIN2

Description: Latin1-General, binary code point comparison sort for Unicode Data, SQL Server Sort Order 40 on Code Page 850 for non-Unicode Data

If you think that there are other collations better suited for this scenario, please mention those as well.


Update on 19.03.2017: To anyone coming to this question:

  • Must check both the answers from @srutzky and @SqlZim, as well as the related referred resources. You don't want to rush into things in this case.
  • As changing collation is not for faint hearted :P, keeping a backup of table data might come in handy.
  • Also check the dependencies on column, such as index and constraint; you may need to drop and create those, as it were in my case.

Have fun :)

  • Worth taking a look: support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/322112/… – Sayan Pal Mar 18 '17 at 19:32
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    I hope you don't mind, but I edited your question title to include the specific issue of 'ss' and 'ß' so that others might find this question more easily in the future. – SqlZim Mar 19 '17 at 12:29
  • @SqlZim Not at all. Thank you for that – Sayan Pal Mar 19 '17 at 12:42
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    Sorry for the OT comment, but I have to just say - wow! Great question Sayan Pal and greater answers by @ srutzky and @SqlZim ! – Phylyp Mar 19 '17 at 14:32
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    @Phylyp and Sayan: I have updated again to add more details to explain points 1 and 2, and added links to point # 4 if anyone wanted to see the difference in those 3 code pages :-) You can see the updates more easily via the revisions page. – Solomon Rutzky Mar 23 '17 at 17:33
up vote 14 down vote accepted
+100

A few things about Collations:

  1. The SQL_ Collations were deprecated as of SQL Server 2000 (yes, 2000). If you can avoid using them, you should (but that doesn't mean go changing a bunch of things if there is no pressing need to!).

    The issue with the SQL_ Collations is really only related to VARCHAR (i.e. non-Unicode) data as NVARCHAR (i.e. Unicode) data uses the rules from the OS. But the rules for sorting and comparison for VARCHAR data, unfortunately, use a simple mapping and do not include the more complex linguistic rules. This is why ss and ß do not equate when stored as VARCHAR using the same SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS Collation. These deprecated Collations also are not able to give a lower weight to dashes when used in the middle of a word. The non-SQL_ Collations (i.e. Windows Collations) use the same rules for both VARCHAR and NVARCHAR so the VARCHAR handling is more robust, more consistent with NVARCHAR.

  2. The _BIN Collations were deprecated as of SQL Server 2005. If you can avoid using them, you should (but that doesn't mean go changing a bunch of things if there is no pressing need to!).

    The issue with the _BIN Collations is rather subtle as it only affects sorting. Comparisons are the same between _BIN and _BIN2 Collations due to them being compared at the byte level (hence no linguistic rules). BUT, due to SQL Server (and Windows / PCs) being Little Endian, entities are stored in reverse byte order. This becomes apparent when dealing with double-byte "characters", which is what NVARCHAR data is: UTF-16 Little Endian. This means that Unicode Code Point U+1216 has a hex/binary representation of 0x1216 on Big Endian systems, but is stored as 0x1612 on Little Endian systems. To come full circle so that the importance of this last point will (hopefully) become obvious: the _BIN Collations will compare byte by byte (after the first character) and hence see U+1216 as being 0x16 and then 0x12, while the _BIN2 Collations will compare code point by code point and hence see U+1216 as being 0x12 and then 0x16.

  3. This particular column is NVARCHAR (a VARCHAR column using SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS would not equate ss and ß) and so for just this column alone, there is no difference between SQL_Latin1_General_CP437_BIN2 and SQL_Latin1_General_CP850_BIN2 due to Unicode being a single, all-inclusive character set.

  4. For VARCHAR data, there would be a difference since they are different code pages (437 and 850), and both of those are different than the one that you are using now (CP1 == code page 1252).

  5. While using a binary Collation is often overkill, in this case it might be necessary given that there is only one locale / culture that does not equate ß with ss: Hungarian. Using a Hungarian Collation might have some linguistic rules that you don't want (or at least wouldn't expect), so the binary Collation seems to be the better choice here (just not any of the 4 you are asking about :-). Just keep in mind that by using a binary Collation, not only are you giving up all linguistic rules, but you also lose the ability to equate different versions of the same character, such as A (Latin Capital Letter A U+0041) and (Fullwidth Latin Capital Letter A U+FF21).

    Use the following query to see what Collations are non-binary and do not equate these characters:

    DECLARE @SQL NVARCHAR(MAX) = N'DECLARE @Counter INT = 1;';
    
    SELECT @SQL += REPLACE(N'
      IF(N''ß'' COLLATE {Name} <> N''ss'' COLLATE {Name})
      BEGIN
        RAISERROR(N''%4d.  {Name}'', 10, 1, @Counter) WITH NOWAIT;
        SET @Counter += 1;
      END;
    ', N'{Name}', col.[name]) + NCHAR(13) + NCHAR(10)
    FROM   sys.fn_helpcollations() col
    WHERE  col.[name] NOT LIKE N'SQL[_]%'
    AND    col.[name] NOT LIKE N'%[_]BIN%'
    ORDER BY col.[name]
    
    --PRINT @SQL;
    EXEC (@SQL);
    

So:

  • If you are going to use a binary Collation, use something like Latin1_General_100_BIN2.
  • You do not need to change the Collation of the entire DB and all of its tables. That is a lot of work, and the only "built-in" mechanism to do it is undocumented (i.e. unsupported).
  • If you were to change the Database's default Collation, that affects name resolution of Database-scoped items such as tables, columns, indexes, functions, stored procedures, etc. Meaning: you would need to regress 100% of the application that touches the database, as well as all SQL Server Agent jobs, etc. that touch this database.
  • If most / all of the queries that use this column need ß with ss to be seen as different, then go ahead and alter the column to use Latin1_General_100_BIN2. This will likely require dropping the following dependent objects and then recreating after the ALTER TABLE:

    • Indexes
    • Unique Constraints
    • Foreign Key Constraints

    HINT: Be sure to check the current NULL / NOT NULL setting of the column and specify that in the ALTER TABLE ... ALTER COLUMN ... statement so that it does not get changed.

  • If only some queries need this different behavior, then override just those comparison operations with the COLLATE clause, on a per-condition basis (e.g. WHERE tab.[ThisColumn] LIKE N'%ss%' COLLATE Latin1_General_100_BIN2). The COLLATE keyword should only be needed on one side (of the operator) as Collation Precedence will apply it to the other side.
  • 1
    Thank you for the detailed answer :) – Sayan Pal Mar 19 '17 at 8:01
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    Very thorough, and thanks again for responding to the request! – SqlZim Mar 19 '17 at 11:40
  • @SqlZim I see the bounty on the question and wanted to say thanks. That was very kind and unnecessary :-). And because I now feel a little guilty for taking over and now getting even more points, I went ahead and made it more worth the bonus by adding more info, mostly on points 1 and 2. Plus a few handy links and a hint on the very last item. :-) – Solomon Rutzky Mar 23 '17 at 17:37
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    You're welcome, and nice improvements! – SqlZim Mar 23 '17 at 17:44
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    @ohgodnotanotherone Most alphabets don't have the ß character, but this is Unicode, so the character exists regardless of the locale / culture-specific rules for sorting. Just like all Hebrew, Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, etc characters exist at all times in Unicode. The point is, as stated, that the Hungarian locale is the only non-binary locale in which ß does not compare to ss as being equal. Hence, using a Hungarian Collation allows for having a good amount of natural language rules (sensitivities, expansions, expected orderings, etc) while being able to distinguish these characters. – Solomon Rutzky Sep 27 at 13:47

In general, BIN2 would be preferable over BIN, and you may want to choose a windows collation over a sql collation. e.g. Latin1_General_100_BIN2

Guidelines for Using BIN and BIN2 Collations

Guidelines for Using BIN Collations

If your SQL Server applications interact with older versions of SQL Server that use binary collations, continue to use binary. Binary collations might be a more suitable choice for mixed environments.


For similar reasons to what has just been stated regarding the BIN2 collations, unless you have specific requirements to maintain backwards-compatibility behavior, you should lean towards using the Windows collations and not the SQL Server-specific collations (i.e. the ones starting with SQL are now considered kinda "sucky" ;-) ).
- @srutzky - Latin1_General_BIN performance impact when changing the database default collation


rextester demo: http://rextester.com/KIIDYH74471

create table t (
    a varchar(16)  --collate SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS /* default */
  , b varchar(16)  --collate SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS
  , c nvarchar(16) --collate SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS
  , d nvarchar(16) --collate SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS 
);
insert into t values ('ss','ß',N'ss',N'ß');
select *
    , case when a = b then '=' else '!=' end as [a=b] /* != */
    , case when a = d then '=' else '!=' end as [a=d] /* = */
    , case when c = b then '=' else '!=' end as [c=b] /* = */
    , case when c = d then '=' else '!=' end as [c=d] /* = */
from t;

returns:

+----+---+----+---+-----+-----+-----+-----+
| a  | b | c  | d | a=b | a=d | c=b | c=d |
+----+---+----+---+-----+-----+-----+-----+
| ss | ß | ss | ß | !=  | =   | =   | =   |
+----+---+----+---+-----+-----+-----+-----+

create table t (
    a varchar(16)  collate Latin1_General_100_BIN2
  , b varchar(16)  collate Latin1_General_100_BIN2
  , c nvarchar(16) collate Latin1_General_100_BIN2
  , d nvarchar(16) collate Latin1_General_100_BIN2
);
insert into t values ('ss','ß',N'ss',N'ß');
select *
    , case when a = b then '=' else '!=' end as [a=b] /* != */
    , case when a = d then '=' else '!=' end as [a=d] /* != */
    , case when c = b then '=' else '!=' end as [c=b] /* != */
    , case when c = d then '=' else '!=' end as [c=d] /* != */
from t;

returns:

+----+---+----+---+-----+-----+-----+-----+
| a  | b | c  | d | a=b | a=d | c=b | c=d |
+----+---+----+---+-----+-----+-----+-----+
| ss | ß | ss | ß | !=  | !=  | !=  | !=  |
+----+---+----+---+-----+-----+-----+-----+
  • Thank you for your answer and sharing the other resources. After going through the answers from the other question, it seems that changing the collation of the database (also the collation of the textual columns of the existing tables) results in more consistent results and better performance. Is that how it is generally done? – Sayan Pal Mar 18 '17 at 19:20
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    @SayanPal I would have to say it depends, but I'll see if I can get srutzky to offer some advice. – SqlZim Mar 18 '17 at 20:28
  • good research :) +1 – Solomon Rutzky Mar 19 '17 at 14:21
  • 1
    @srutzky Just good sources :P – SqlZim Mar 19 '17 at 14:23

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