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I'm trying to read arrow keys character from the terminal and use the to send String type of messages through ROS. For doing so I'm using termios read() function.

Firstly, I have done a small test that works fine under C, compiled using gcc. This is the code:

#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <termios.h> // for keyboard input
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

bool quit_requested = false;

void processKeyboardInput (char c)
{
   switch (c)
   {
     case 68:// Left arrow pressed
     {
       puts("Left pressed");
       break;
     }
     case 67://Right arrow pressed
     {
       puts("Right pressed");
       break;
     }
     case 65://Up arrow pressed
     {
       puts("Up pressed");
       break;
     }
     case 66://Down arrow pressed
     {
       puts("Down pressed");
       break;
     }
     case 'q'://Quit arrow pressed
     {
       quit_requested = true;
       puts("q pressed, quitting...");
     }
     default:
     {
       break;
     }
 }

}

int main(int argc, char const *argv[]) {
  int key_file_descriptor;
  struct termios raw;
  struct termios original_terminal_state;

  tcgetattr(key_file_descriptor, &original_terminal_state); // get       terminal properties
  memcpy(&raw, &original_terminal_state, sizeof(struct termios));

  raw.c_lflag &= ~(ICANON | ECHO);//local modes, enable canonical mode and echo
  // Setting a new line, then end of file
  raw.c_cc[VEOL] = 1;//special characters
  raw.c_cc[VEOF] = 2;
  tcsetattr(key_file_descriptor, TCSANOW, &raw);

  puts("Reading from keyboard");
  puts("---------------------------");
  puts("Press the arrow keys to move and q to quit");

  char c;
  while (!quit_requested)
  {
    if (read(key_file_descriptor, &c, 1) < 0)
    {
      perror("read char failed():");
      exit(-1);
    }
    processKeyboardInput(c);
  }
      tcsetattr(key_file_descriptor, TCSANOW,      &original_terminal_state);
      puts("Exit");
    return 0;
    }

Once done this, I have added ROS stuff to send the keys using a String message:

#include <unistd.h>
#include <termios.h> // for keyboard input
#include <cstring>
#include <stdio.h>

#include "ros/ros.h"
#include "std_msgs/String.h"


bool quit_requested = false;


std::string processKeyboardInput (char c)
{

   switch (c)
   {
     case 68:// Left arrow pressed
     {
       puts("Left pressed");
       return ("left");
     }
     case 67://Right arrow pressed
     {
       puts("Right pressed");
       return ("right");
     }
     case 65://Up arrow pressed
     {
       puts("Up pressed");
       return ("forward");
     }
     case 66://Down arrow pressed
     {
       puts("Down pressed");
       return ("backward");
     }
     case 'q'://Quit arrow pressed
     {
       quit_requested = true;
       puts("q pressed, quitting...");
     }
     default:
     {
       return ("");
     }
 }

}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {

  std::string cmd;
  int key_file_descriptor;
  char c;
  int error;
  struct termios raw;
  struct termios original_terminal_state;
  //std::string name = "key_teleop";

  /**** INIT ROS STUFFS  *****/
  ros::init(argc, argv, "key_teleop");
  std_msgs::String msg;
  ros::NodeHandle n;
  ros::Publisher key_pub = n.advertise<std_msgs::String>("key_teleop", 1000);
  ros::Rate loop_rate(1);
  /***************************/

  tcgetattr(key_file_descriptor, &original_terminal_state); // get terminal properties
  memcpy(&raw, &original_terminal_state, sizeof(struct termios));

  raw.c_lflag &= ~(ICANON | ECHO);//local modes, enable canonical mode and echo
  // Setting a new line, then end of file
  raw.c_cc[VEOL] = 1;//special characters
  raw.c_cc[VEOF] = 2;
  tcsetattr(key_file_descriptor, TCSANOW, &raw);

  puts("Reading from keyboard");
  puts("---------------------------");
  puts("Press the arrow keys to move and q to quit");


  while (ros::ok() & (!quit_requested))
  {
  //if (read(key_file_descriptor, &c, 1) < 0)
    error = read(key_file_descriptor, &c, 1);
    if ( error < 0)//Process the error
    {//TODO I get errors, not ROSify code doesn't, C / C++ code mixture issue??
      if (error == EAGAIN)
        puts ("EAGAIN");
      else if (error == EBADF)
        puts ("EBADF");
      else if (error == EFAULT)
        puts ("EFAULT");
      else if (error == EINTR)
        puts ("EINTR");
      else if (error == EINVAL)
        puts ("EINVAL");
      else if (error == EIO)
        puts ("EIO");
      else if (error = EISDIR)
        puts ("EISDIR");
      perror("read char failed():");
      exit(-1);
    }
    cmd = processKeyboardInput(c);
    if (!cmd.empty())
    {
      msg.data = cmd;
      key_pub.publish(msg);
      ros::spinOnce();
      //loop_rate.sleep();
    }
  }
  tcsetattr(key_file_descriptor, TCSANOW, &original_terminal_state);
  puts("Exit");
return 0;
}

Once created the CMakeLists.txt and package.xml, I have compiled using catkin_make. Test it out and now doesn't work, most of the times I receive a error return at read(), it enter into EISDIR case and prints it. Any idea why now I'm receiving this error while the previous c example is working fine??

Thanks in advance!

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  • 1
    Which line generates the EISDIR error? The read() call in the main() in the second example? You need to test what errno is set to — not error. Usually, error will be -1, which won't match any of the E* macros since they're all positive. Mar 18, 2017 at 8:48
  • 1
    Yes, the read() returns a negative value and that's why I have the case. It enters into error= EISDIR case. I don't get why the first example works and second doesn't.
    – mugurumov
    Mar 18, 2017 at 9:00
  • 1
    You've got an assignment instead of equality typo: else if (error = EISDIR) puts ("EISDIR");. I recommend deleting this question, and turning up the compiler warning levels. If you're using GCC, use at least -Wall -Werror -Wextra. I use more than that, but I've only been programming in C for a bit over 30 years, so I know I don't know all about it (and the options stop me making silly mistakes — like assignments instead of comparisons). Note that you should not be testing error; you might be testing errno which would contain the value of an E* macro. Mar 18, 2017 at 9:02
  • @mugurumov If you add the error-checking code to your first example you will have exactly the same problem.
    – molbdnilo
    Mar 18, 2017 at 9:45

1 Answer 1

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Following the reccomendation of @Jonathan, I have added the flags -Wall -Werror -Wextra to the CMake compiling flags and discovered the next message thrown by the compiler:

error: ‘key_file_descriptor’ may be used uninitialized in this function [-Werror=maybe-uninitialized]

I have found this nice article and changed the int key_file_descriptorI was using for STDIN_FILENO. So I have replaced it all over the code and now is working! I have deleted also the comparison typo. Thanks guys!

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