I have this simple program to calculate number of grains with respect to squares:

#include "library/std_lib_facilities.h"

/*There is an old story that the emperor wanted to thank the inventor of the game of chess and asked the inventor to name
his reward. The inventor asked for one grain of rice for the first square, 2 for the second, 4 for the third, and so on,
doubling for each of the 64 squares. That may sound modest, but there wasn’t that much rice in the empire! Write a
program to calculate how many squares are required to give the inventor at least 1000 grains of rice, at least 1,000,000
grains, and at least 1,000,000,000 grains.*/

int main()
{
    int grains = 1;
    int squares = 1; 

    while(grains < 1000) {
        squares++;
        grains *=2;
        cout << grains << " rice grains for " << squares << " squares" << '\n';
    }
    return 0;
}

The loop prints the grain and square after each loop. This is the output in the terminal:

2 rice grains for 2 squares
4 rice grains for 3 squares
8 rice grains for 4 squares
16 rice grains for 5 squares
32 rice grains for 6 squares
64 rice grains for 7 squares
128 rice grains for 8 squares
256 rice grains for 9 squares
512 rice grains for 10 squares
1024 rice grains for 11 squares

As you can see, the loop termination is greater than the termination condition which is set at grain < 1000.

I don't have any problem with the result, I just want to know why the loop exceeds the termination criteria, why did it not stop at 512 grains? is it because of the iteration of squares in the loop body?

  • 2
    The termination condition is only tested when execution comes to the start of the loop -- not after every statement in the loop – M.M Mar 18 '17 at 9:06
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Because

 while(grains < 1000) {  //when grain value is 512, which is true.
        squares++;
        grains *=2;  //become 1024
        cout << grains << " rice grains for " << squares << " squares" << '\n';
    }

instead, you can change your while condition to while(squares < 10)

or

int grains = 2;
int squares = 2; 
while(grains < 1000) {  //when grain value is 1024, which is false.
            cout << grains << " rice grains for " << squares << " squares" << '\n';
            grains *=2;
            squares++;

        }
  • thanks. It is much clearer now. I like the first example, it better explains how the loop works. – Onome Sotu Mar 18 '17 at 9:16
  • Then you can accept the answer – Ravi Mar 18 '17 at 9:16
  • I wanted to, but it gives me a time restriction. Can't accept answer in so and so minutes etc. – Onome Sotu Mar 18 '17 at 9:18

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