I need to optimize this query:

SELECT 
    cp.id_currency_purchase,
    MIN(cr.buy_rate),
    MAX(cr.buy_rate)
FROM currency_purchase cp
JOIN currency_rate cr ON cr.id_currency = cp.id_currency AND cr.id_currency_source = cp.id_currency_source
WHERE cr.rate_date >= cp.purchase_date
GROUP BY cp.id_currency_purchase

Now it takes about 0,5 s, which is way too long for me (it's used either updated very often, so query cache doesn't help in my case).

Here's EXPLAIN EXTENDED output:

+------+-------------+-------+-------+--------------------------------+-------------+---------+-------------------------+-------+----------+-------------+
| id   | select_type | table | type  | possible_keys                  | key         | key_len | ref                     | rows  | filtered | Extra       |
+------+-------------+-------+-------+--------------------------------+-------------+---------+-------------------------+-------+----------+-------------+
|    1 | SIMPLE      | cp    | index | id_currency_source,id_currency | PRIMARY     | 8       | NULL                    |     9 |   100.00 |             |
|    1 | SIMPLE      | cr    | ref   | id_currency,id_currency_source | id_currency | 8       | lokatnik.cp.id_currency | 21433 |   100.00 | Using where |
+------+-------------+-------+-------+--------------------------------+-------------+---------+-------------------------+-------+----------+-------------+

There are some great questions at stackoverflow for one table GROUP BY optimization (like: https://stackoverflow.com/a/11631480/1320081), but I really don't know how to optimize query based on JOIN-ed tables.

How can I speed it up?

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The best index for this query:

SELECT cp.id_currency_purchase, MIN(cr.buy_rate), MAX(cr.buy_rate)
FROM currency_purchase cp JOIN
     currency_rate cr
     ON cr.id_currency = cp.id_currency AND
        cr.id_currency_source = cp.id_currency_source
WHERE cr.rate_date >= cp.purchase_date
GROUP BY cp.id_currency_purchase;

is: currency_rate(id_currency, id_currency_source, rate_date, buy_rate). You might also try currency_purchase(id_currency, id_currency_source, rate_date).

  • How about (id_currency, id_currency_source, buy_rate)? Wouldn't the best choice actually depend on how many different date and rates there are on the average per id_currency, id_currency_source combination? – Frazz Mar 18 '17 at 9:47
  • @GordonLinoff currency_rate(id_currency, id_currency_source, rate_date, buy_rate) is the best in my case, it speeded up my query from ~0,5 s to ~0,075 s, when the other indexes (including one mentioned by @Frazz) shortened execution time to 0,145 s. – Daniel Gadawski Mar 18 '17 at 10:04
  • 1
    Good. Just keep in mind that you may want to retest this if and when the database population changes significantly. I mean... especially if you are currently using a test database, beware that things may be different on the production db. – Frazz Mar 18 '17 at 10:09
  • @Frazz, sure, I'm aware. This db works on production for half year, on test environment query times are worse. – Daniel Gadawski Mar 18 '17 at 10:26
  • 1
    The reason Gordon's 4-col index is better than Frazz's 3-col is that the 4 is "covering" -- that is, all the needed columns are in the index, so no need to reach for reaching into the data. – Rick James Mar 18 '17 at 22:17

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.