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I have a list of shell scripts which needs to be run sequentially and they take a different text file as input parameter. I tried to put all the scripts into a file and source the file.

But there is a bash error coming up. What is the best way to do this. My files are:

sh test.sh --dir hello --fname 1.txt --bdt 0318    
sh test.sh --dir hello --fname 2.txt --bdt 0318

Here dirname is the directory fname is filename.

  • What is the error you are seeing? – Inian Mar 19 '17 at 4:56
  • bash: source: /usr/bin/test: cannot execute binary file – Andy Reddy Mar 19 '17 at 5:00
  • @Inian I included these scripts in a file test and running it as source test – Andy Reddy Mar 19 '17 at 5:03
  • Can you run it as source ./test – Inian Mar 19 '17 at 5:04
  • @Inian Its working. Thank you. But i ran the same with just the copy commands in a file and source run it. It worked. Why is not working for shell scripts? – Andy Reddy Mar 19 '17 at 5:14
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The source command will:

Read and execute commands from the filename argument in the current shell context. If filename does not contain a slash, the PATH variable is used to find filename.

This behaviour is defined (for ., its alias) by POSIX. So you can put sourceable configuration scripts inside PATH and access them without a qualified path. To access the file you want, give an absolute or relative path instead:

source ./test
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  • @KattangooriReddy: You can do it, but as a background job it will not affect your running session. – Inian Mar 19 '17 at 5:43
  • @KattangooriReddy : there is nothing stopping it to work! But it might not change the current shell's behavior. – Inian Mar 19 '17 at 6:06
  • The problem running on background is that I am connected to remote server through putty so it is disconnecting often and my session is expiring there by halting my source ./test – Andy Reddy Mar 19 '17 at 6:14

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