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Can anyone please clearly explain the difference between 1D, 2D, and 3D convolutions in convolutional neural networks (in deep learning) with the use of examples?

394

I want to explain with picture from C3D.

In a nutshell, convolutional direction & output shape is important!

enter image description here

↑↑↑↑↑ 1D Convolutions - Basic ↑↑↑↑↑

  • just 1-direction (time-axis) to calculate conv
  • input = [W], filter = [k], output = [W]
  • ex) input = [1,1,1,1,1], filter = [0.25,0.5,0.25], output = [1,1,1,1,1]
  • output-shape is 1D array
  • example) graph smoothing

tf.nn.conv1d code Toy Example

import tensorflow as tf
import numpy as np

sess = tf.Session()

ones_1d = np.ones(5)
weight_1d = np.ones(3)
strides_1d = 1

in_1d = tf.constant(ones_1d, dtype=tf.float32)
filter_1d = tf.constant(weight_1d, dtype=tf.float32)

in_width = int(in_1d.shape[0])
filter_width = int(filter_1d.shape[0])

input_1d   = tf.reshape(in_1d, [1, in_width, 1])
kernel_1d = tf.reshape(filter_1d, [filter_width, 1, 1])
output_1d = tf.squeeze(tf.nn.conv1d(input_1d, kernel_1d, strides_1d, padding='SAME'))
print sess.run(output_1d)

enter image description here

↑↑↑↑↑ 2D Convolutions - Basic ↑↑↑↑↑

  • 2-direction (x,y) to calculate conv
  • output-shape is 2D Matrix
  • input = [W, H], filter = [k,k] output = [W,H]
  • example) Sobel Egde Fllter

tf.nn.conv2d - Toy Example

ones_2d = np.ones((5,5))
weight_2d = np.ones((3,3))
strides_2d = [1, 1, 1, 1]

in_2d = tf.constant(ones_2d, dtype=tf.float32)
filter_2d = tf.constant(weight_2d, dtype=tf.float32)

in_width = int(in_2d.shape[0])
in_height = int(in_2d.shape[1])

filter_width = int(filter_2d.shape[0])
filter_height = int(filter_2d.shape[1])

input_2d   = tf.reshape(in_2d, [1, in_height, in_width, 1])
kernel_2d = tf.reshape(filter_2d, [filter_height, filter_width, 1, 1])

output_2d = tf.squeeze(tf.nn.conv2d(input_2d, kernel_2d, strides=strides_2d, padding='SAME'))
print sess.run(output_2d)

enter image description here

↑↑↑↑↑ 3D Convolutions - Basic ↑↑↑↑↑

  • 3-direction (x,y,z) to calcuate conv
  • output-shape is 3D Volume
  • input = [W,H,L], filter = [k,k,d] output = [W,H,M]
  • d < L is important! for making volume output
  • example) C3D

tf.nn.conv3d - Toy Example

ones_3d = np.ones((5,5,5))
weight_3d = np.ones((3,3,3))
strides_3d = [1, 1, 1, 1, 1]

in_3d = tf.constant(ones_3d, dtype=tf.float32)
filter_3d = tf.constant(weight_3d, dtype=tf.float32)

in_width = int(in_3d.shape[0])
in_height = int(in_3d.shape[1])
in_depth = int(in_3d.shape[2])

filter_width = int(filter_3d.shape[0])
filter_height = int(filter_3d.shape[1])
filter_depth = int(filter_3d.shape[2])

input_3d   = tf.reshape(in_3d, [1, in_depth, in_height, in_width, 1])
kernel_3d = tf.reshape(filter_3d, [filter_depth, filter_height, filter_width, 1, 1])

output_3d = tf.squeeze(tf.nn.conv3d(input_3d, kernel_3d, strides=strides_3d, padding='SAME'))
print sess.run(output_3d)

enter image description here

↑↑↑↑↑ 2D Convolutions with 3D input - LeNet, VGG, ..., ↑↑↑↑↑

  • Eventhough input is 3D ex) 224x224x3, 112x112x32
  • output-shape is not 3D Volume, but 2D Matrix
  • because filter depth = L must be matched with input channels = L
  • 2-direction (x,y) to calcuate conv! not 3D
  • input = [W,H,L], filter = [k,k,L] output = [W,H]
  • output-shape is 2D Matrix
  • what if we want to train N filters (N is number of filters)
  • then output shape is (stacked 2D) 3D = 2D x N matrix.

conv2d - LeNet, VGG, ... for 1 filter

in_channels = 32 # 3 for RGB, 32, 64, 128, ... 
ones_3d = np.ones((5,5,in_channels)) # input is 3d, in_channels = 32
# filter must have 3d-shpae with in_channels
weight_3d = np.ones((3,3,in_channels)) 
strides_2d = [1, 1, 1, 1]

in_3d = tf.constant(ones_3d, dtype=tf.float32)
filter_3d = tf.constant(weight_3d, dtype=tf.float32)

in_width = int(in_3d.shape[0])
in_height = int(in_3d.shape[1])

filter_width = int(filter_3d.shape[0])
filter_height = int(filter_3d.shape[1])

input_3d   = tf.reshape(in_3d, [1, in_height, in_width, in_channels])
kernel_3d = tf.reshape(filter_3d, [filter_height, filter_width, in_channels, 1])

output_2d = tf.squeeze(tf.nn.conv2d(input_3d, kernel_3d, strides=strides_2d, padding='SAME'))
print sess.run(output_2d)

conv2d - LeNet, VGG, ... for N filters

in_channels = 32 # 3 for RGB, 32, 64, 128, ... 
out_channels = 64 # 128, 256, ...
ones_3d = np.ones((5,5,in_channels)) # input is 3d, in_channels = 32
# filter must have 3d-shpae x number of filters = 4D
weight_4d = np.ones((3,3,in_channels, out_channels))
strides_2d = [1, 1, 1, 1]

in_3d = tf.constant(ones_3d, dtype=tf.float32)
filter_4d = tf.constant(weight_4d, dtype=tf.float32)

in_width = int(in_3d.shape[0])
in_height = int(in_3d.shape[1])

filter_width = int(filter_4d.shape[0])
filter_height = int(filter_4d.shape[1])

input_3d   = tf.reshape(in_3d, [1, in_height, in_width, in_channels])
kernel_4d = tf.reshape(filter_4d, [filter_height, filter_width, in_channels, out_channels])

#output stacked shape is 3D = 2D x N matrix
output_3d = tf.nn.conv2d(input_3d, kernel_4d, strides=strides_2d, padding='SAME')
print sess.run(output_3d)

enter image description here ↑↑↑↑↑ Bonus 1x1 conv in CNN - GoogLeNet, ..., ↑↑↑↑↑

  • 1x1 conv is confusing when you think this as 2D image filter like sobel
  • for 1x1 conv in CNN, input is 3D shape as above picture.
  • it calculate depth-wise filtering
  • input = [W,H,L], filter = [1,1,L] output = [W,H]
  • output stacked shape is 3D = 2D x N matrix.

tf.nn.conv2d - special case 1x1 conv

in_channels = 32 # 3 for RGB, 32, 64, 128, ... 
out_channels = 64 # 128, 256, ...
ones_3d = np.ones((1,1,in_channels)) # input is 3d, in_channels = 32
# filter must have 3d-shpae x number of filters = 4D
weight_4d = np.ones((3,3,in_channels, out_channels))
strides_2d = [1, 1, 1, 1]

in_3d = tf.constant(ones_3d, dtype=tf.float32)
filter_4d = tf.constant(weight_4d, dtype=tf.float32)

in_width = int(in_3d.shape[0])
in_height = int(in_3d.shape[1])

filter_width = int(filter_4d.shape[0])
filter_height = int(filter_4d.shape[1])

input_3d   = tf.reshape(in_3d, [1, in_height, in_width, in_channels])
kernel_4d = tf.reshape(filter_4d, [filter_height, filter_width, in_channels, out_channels])

#output stacked shape is 3D = 2D x N matrix
output_3d = tf.nn.conv2d(input_3d, kernel_4d, strides=strides_2d, padding='SAME')
print sess.run(output_3d)

Animation (2D Conv with 3D-inputs)

enter image description here - Original Link : LINK
- The author: Martin Görner
- Twitter: @martin_gorner
- Google +: plus.google.com/+MartinGorne

Bonus 1D Convolutions with 2D input

enter image description here ↑↑↑↑↑ 1D Convolutions with 1D input ↑↑↑↑↑

enter image description here ↑↑↑↑↑ 1D Convolutions with 2D input ↑↑↑↑↑

  • Eventhough input is 2D ex) 20x14
  • output-shape is not 2D , but 1D Matrix
  • because filter height = L must be matched with input height = L
  • 1-direction (x) to calcuate conv! not 2D
  • input = [W,L], filter = [k,L] output = [W]
  • output-shape is 1D Matrix
  • what if we want to train N filters (N is number of filters)
  • then output shape is (stacked 1D) 2D = 1D x N matrix.

Bonus C3D

in_channels = 32 # 3, 32, 64, 128, ... 
out_channels = 64 # 3, 32, 64, 128, ... 
ones_4d = np.ones((5,5,5,in_channels))
weight_5d = np.ones((3,3,3,in_channels,out_channels))
strides_3d = [1, 1, 1, 1, 1]

in_4d = tf.constant(ones_4d, dtype=tf.float32)
filter_5d = tf.constant(weight_5d, dtype=tf.float32)

in_width = int(in_4d.shape[0])
in_height = int(in_4d.shape[1])
in_depth = int(in_4d.shape[2])

filter_width = int(filter_5d.shape[0])
filter_height = int(filter_5d.shape[1])
filter_depth = int(filter_5d.shape[2])

input_4d   = tf.reshape(in_4d, [1, in_depth, in_height, in_width, in_channels])
kernel_5d = tf.reshape(filter_5d, [filter_depth, filter_height, filter_width, in_channels, out_channels])

output_4d = tf.nn.conv3d(input_4d, kernel_5d, strides=strides_3d, padding='SAME')
print sess.run(output_4d)

sess.close()

Input & Output in Tensorflow

enter image description here

enter image description here

Summary

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
  • 16
    Considering your labor and clarity in the explanations, upvotes of 8 are too less. – user3282777 Sep 19 '17 at 13:21
  • 2
    The 2d conv with 3d input is a nice touch. I would suggest an edit to include 1d conv with 2d input (e.g. a multi-channel array) and compare the difference thereof with a 2d conv with 2d input. – SumNeuron Nov 12 '17 at 18:24
  • 2
    Amazing answer! – Ben Jan 30 '18 at 13:49
  • Why is the conv direction in 2d ↲. I have seen sources that claim that the direction is for row 1, then for row 1+stride. Convolution itself is shift invariant, so why does the direction of convolution matter? – Minh Triet Mar 19 '18 at 14:11
  • Thank you for your question. Yes! convolution itself is shift invariant. so for calculation conv direction is not matter.(You can calculate 2d conv with two big matrix multiplication. caffe framework already did) but for understanding it's better to explain with conv direction. because 2d conv with 3d input is confusing without direction. ^^ – runhani Mar 29 '18 at 10:38
5

Following the answer from @runhani I am adding a few more details to make the explanation a bit more clear and will try to explain this a bit more (and of course with exmaples from TF1 and TF2).

One of the main additional bits I'm including are,

  • Emphasis on applications
  • Usage of tf.Variable
  • Clearer explanation of inputs/kernels/outputs 1D/2D/3D convolution
  • The effects of stride/padding

1D Convolution

Here's how you might do 1D convolution using TF 1 and TF 2.

And to be specific my data has following shapes,

  • 1D vector - [batch size, width, in channels] (e.g. 1, 5, 1)
  • Kernel - [width, in channels, out channels] (e.g. 5, 1, 4)
  • Output - [batch size, width, out_channels] (e.g. 1, 5, 4)

TF1 example

import tensorflow as tf
import numpy as np

inp = tf.placeholder(shape=[None, 5, 1], dtype=tf.float32)
kernel = tf.Variable(tf.initializers.glorot_uniform()([5, 1, 4]), dtype=tf.float32)
out = tf.nn.conv1d(inp, kernel, stride=1, padding='SAME')

with tf.Session() as sess:
  tf.global_variables_initializer().run()
  print(sess.run(out, feed_dict={inp: np.array([[[0],[1],[2],[3],[4]],[[5],[4],[3],[2],[1]]])}))

TF2 Example

import tensorflow as tf
import numpy as np

inp = np.array([[[0],[1],[2],[3],[4]],[[5],[4],[3],[2],[1]]]).astype(np.float32)
kernel = tf.Variable(tf.initializers.glorot_uniform()([5, 1, 4]), dtype=tf.float32)
out = tf.nn.conv1d(inp, kernel, stride=1, padding='SAME')
print(out)

It's way less work with TF2 as TF2 does not need Session and variable_initializer for example.

What might this look like in real-life?

So let's understand what this is doing using a signal smoothing example. On the left you got the original and on the right you got output of a Convolution 1D which has 3 output channels.

enter image description here

What do multiple channels mean?

Multiple channels are basically multiple feature representations of an input. In this example you have three representations obtained by three different filters. The first channel is the equally-weighted smoothing filter. The second is a filter that weights the middle of the filter more than the boundaries. The final filter does the opposite of the second. So you can see how these different filters bring about different effects.

Deep learning applications of 1D convolution

1D convolution has been successful used for the sentence classification task.

2D Convolution

Off to 2D convolution. If you are a deep learning person, chances that you haven't come across 2D convolution is … well about zero. It is used in CNNs for image classification, object detection, etc. as well as in NLP problems that involve images (e.g. image caption generation).

Let's try an example, I got a convolution kernel with the following filters here,

  • Edge detection kernel (3x3 window)
  • Blur kernel (3x3 window)
  • Sharpen kernel (3x3 window)

And to be specific my data has following shapes,

  • Image (black and white) - [batch_size, height, width, 1] (e.g. 1, 340, 371, 1)
  • Kernel (aka filters) - [height, width, in channels, out channels] (e.g. 3, 3, 1, 3)
  • Output (aka feature maps) - [batch_size, height, width, out_channels] (e.g. 1, 340, 371, 3)

TF1 Example,

import tensorflow as tf
import numpy as np
from PIL import Image

im = np.array(Image.open(<some image>).convert('L'))#/255.0

kernel_init = np.array(
    [
     [[[-1, 1.0/9, 0]],[[-1, 1.0/9, -1]],[[-1, 1.0/9, 0]]],
     [[[-1, 1.0/9, -1]],[[8, 1.0/9,5]],[[-1, 1.0/9,-1]]],
     [[[-1, 1.0/9,0]],[[-1, 1.0/9,-1]],[[-1, 1.0/9, 0]]]
     ])

inp = tf.placeholder(shape=[None, image_height, image_width, 1], dtype=tf.float32)
kernel = tf.Variable(kernel_init, dtype=tf.float32)
out = tf.nn.conv2d(inp, kernel, strides=[1,1,1,1], padding='SAME')

with tf.Session() as sess:
  tf.global_variables_initializer().run()
  res = sess.run(out, feed_dict={inp: np.expand_dims(np.expand_dims(im,0),-1)})

TF2 Example

import tensorflow as tf
import numpy as np
from PIL import Image

im = np.array(Image.open(<some image>).convert('L'))#/255.0
x = np.expand_dims(np.expand_dims(im,0),-1)

kernel_init = np.array(
    [
     [[[-1, 1.0/9, 0]],[[-1, 1.0/9, -1]],[[-1, 1.0/9, 0]]],
     [[[-1, 1.0/9, -1]],[[8, 1.0/9,5]],[[-1, 1.0/9,-1]]],
     [[[-1, 1.0/9,0]],[[-1, 1.0/9,-1]],[[-1, 1.0/9, 0]]]
     ])

kernel = tf.Variable(kernel_init, dtype=tf.float32)

out = tf.nn.conv2d(x, kernel, strides=[1,1,1,1], padding='SAME')

What might this look like in real life?

Here you can see the output produced by above code. The first image is the original and going clock-wise you have outputs of the 1st filter, 2nd filter and 3 filter. enter image description here

What do multiple channels mean?

In the context if 2D convolution, it is much easier to understand what these multiple channels mean. Say you are doing face recognition. You can think of (this is a very unrealistic simplification but gets the point across) each filter represents an eye, mouth, nose, etc. So that each feature map would be a binary representation of whether that feature is there in the image you provided. I don't think I need to stress that for a face recognition model those are very valuable features. More information in this article.

This is an illustration of what I'm trying to articulate.

enter image description here

Deep learning applications of 2D convolution

2D convolution is very prevalent in the realm of deep learning.

CNNs (Convolution Neural Networks) use 2D convolution operation for almost all computer vision tasks (e.g. Image classification, object detection, video classification).

3D Convolution

Now it becomes increasingly difficult to illustrate what's going as the number of dimensions increase. But with good understanding of how 1D and 2D convolution works, it's very straight-forward to generalize that understanding to 3D convolution. So here goes.

And to be specific my data has following shapes,

  • 3D data (LIDAR) - [batch size, height, width, depth, in channels] (e.g. 1, 200, 200, 200, 1)
  • Kernel - [height, width, depth, in channels, out channels] (e.g. 5, 5, 5, 1, 3)
  • Output - [batch size, width, height, width, depth, out_channels] (e.g. 1, 200, 200, 2000, 3)

TF1 Example

import tensorflow as tf
import numpy as np

tf.reset_default_graph()

inp = tf.placeholder(shape=[None, 200, 200, 200, 1], dtype=tf.float32)
kernel = tf.Variable(tf.initializers.glorot_uniform()([5,5,5,1,3]), dtype=tf.float32)
out = tf.nn.conv3d(inp, kernel, strides=[1,1,1,1,1], padding='SAME')

with tf.Session() as sess:
  tf.global_variables_initializer().run()
  res = sess.run(out, feed_dict={inp: np.random.normal(size=(1,200,200,200,1))})

TF2 Example

import tensorflow as tf
import numpy as np

x = np.random.normal(size=(1,200,200,200,1))
kernel = tf.Variable(tf.initializers.glorot_uniform()([5,5,5,1,3]), dtype=tf.float32)
out = tf.nn.conv3d(x, kernel, strides=[1,1,1,1,1], padding='SAME') 

Deep learning applications of 3D convolution

3D convolution has been used when developing machine learning applications involving LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data which is 3 dimensional in nature.

What... more jargon?: Stride and padding

Alright you're nearly there. So hold on. Let's see what is stride and padding is. They are quite intuitive if you think about them.

If you stride across a corridor, you get there faster in fewer steps. But it also means that you observed lesser surrounding than if you walked across the room. Let's now reinforce our understanding with a pretty picture too! Let's understand these via 2D convolution.

Understanding stride

Convolution stride

When you use tf.nn.conv2d for example, you need to set it as a vector of 4 elements. There's no reason to get intimidated by this. It just contain the strides in the following order.

  • 2D Convolution - [batch stride, height stride, width stride, channel stride]. Here, batch stride and channel stride you just set to one (I've been implementing deep learning models for 5 years and never had to set them to anything except one). So that leaves you only with 2 strides to set.

  • 3D Convolution - [batch stride, height stride, width stride, depth stride, channel stride]. Here you worry about height/width/depth strides only.

Understanding padding

Now, you notice that no matter how small your stride is (i.e. 1) there is an unavoidable dimension reduction happening during convolution (e.g. width is 3 after convolving a 4 unit wide image). This is undesirable especially when building deep convolution neural networks. This is where padding comes to the rescue. There are two most commonly used padding types.

  • SAME and VALID

Below you can see the difference.

enter image description here

Final word: If you are very curious, you might be wondering. We just dropped a bomb on whole automatic dimension reduction and now talking about having different strides. But the best thing about stride is that you control when where and how the dimensions get reduced.

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2
  1. CNN 1D,2D, or 3D refers to convolution direction, rather than input or filter dimension.

  2. For 1 channel input, CNN2D equals to CNN1D is kernel length = input length. (1 conv direction)

| improve this answer | |
2

In summary, In 1D CNN, kernel moves in 1 direction. Input and output data of 1D CNN is 2 dimensional. Mostly used on Time-Series data.

In 2D CNN, kernel moves in 2 directions. Input and output data of 2D CNN is 3 dimensional. Mostly used on Image data.

In 3D CNN, kernel moves in 3 directions. Input and output data of 3D CNN is 4 dimensional. Mostly used on 3D Image data (MRI, CT Scans).

You can find more details here: https://medium.com/@xzz201920/conv1d-conv2d-and-conv3d-8a59182c4d6

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