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As we know, the quicksort performance is O(n*log(n)) in average but the merge- and heapsort performance is O(n*log(n)) in average too. So the question is why quicksort is faster in average.

  • heapsort is O(n*log(n)) in the worst case - probably in every case. – phkahler Nov 28 '10 at 3:07
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Worst case for quick sort is actually worse than heapsort and mergesort, but quicksort is faster on average.

As to why, it will take time to explain and thus i will refer to Skiena, The algorithm design manual.

A quote that summarizes the quicksort vs merge/heapsort:

When faced with algorithms of the same asymptotic complexity, implementation details and system quirks such as cache performance and memory size may well prove to be the decisive factor. What we can say is that experiments show that where a properly implemented quicksort is implemented well, it is typically 2-3 times faster than mergesort or heapsort. The primary reason is that the operations in the innermost loop are simpler. But I can’t argue with you if you don’t believe me when I say quicksort is faster. It is a question whose solution lies outside the analytical tools we are using. The best way to tell is to implement both algorithms and experiment.

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Wikipedia suggests:

Typically, quicksort is significantly faster in practice than other O(nlogn) algorithms, because its inner loop can be efficiently implemented on most architectures, and in most real-world data, it is possible to make design choices that minimize the probability of requiring quadratic time. Additionally, quicksort tends to make excellent usage of the memory hierarchy, taking perfect advantage of virtual memory and available caches. Although quicksort is not an in-place sort and uses auxiliary memory, it is very well suited to modern computer architectures.

Also have a look at comparison with other sorting algorithms on the same page.

See also Why is quicksort better than other sorting algorithms in practice? on the CS site.

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    Do you know how exactly it "takes advantage of virtual memory and cache" ? Any example ? – Michael Nov 26 '10 at 23:09
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    The algorithm traverses sequentially which makes for good locality of reference (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Locality_of_reference) which makes your cache work well (and thus speed up the work) – ChristopheD Nov 26 '10 at 23:23
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    Algorithms which are reading memory sequentially potentially already have the next item readily available in (fast) cache because of cache line size. Why couldn't that influence speed opposed to an algorithm which traverses memory locations rather unpredictably? – ChristopheD Nov 26 '10 at 23:48
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    @Michael: quicksort has two advantages regarding cache. First is sequential access - the read and write points move through memory in a way that means you're only accessing a couple of pages at a time, and prefetching has a good chance of working. Compare something like the binary search in an insertion sort, which doesn't visit as many locations (in each pass), but visits dispersed locations, so it's likely to be slower per access. Second, top-down recursion provides a form of cache obliviousness - once the sections you're working on are smaller than a page, everything speeds up considerably. – Steve Jessop Nov 27 '10 at 0:32
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    (not that insertion sort is one of the n log n sorts we're comparing with, but actually the comparison between quicksort and insertion sort is quite important, because usually with quicksort you want to switch to insertion sort at a surprising large array size, where insertion becomes faster). Mergesort is also sequential access. Heapsort has some structure to the access, of course, but is a bit all over the place. – Steve Jessop Nov 27 '10 at 0:37
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Timsort might be a better option as it is optimised for the kind of data seen when sorting in general, in the Python language where data often contains embedded 'runs' of presorted items. It has lately been adopted by Java too.

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