6

How do I get the current logged in user in forms.py? I am trying to pre-populate the email field of the current user.

class ContactMe(forms.Form):
    name                 = forms.CharField(label = "Name")
    email_address        = forms.CharField(label = "Email Address", intital = request.user.email)
    subject              = forms.CharField(label = "Subject")
    message              = forms.CharField(label = "Message", widget=forms.Textarea(attrs={'cols': 10, 'rows': 3}))
    additional_comments  = forms.CharField(required = False)
    class Meta:
        model = Contact_me

I tried passing request from views.py as :

contact_form = ContactMe(request.POST or None, request)

and then receiving the request inside of class ContactMe as :

class ContactMe(forms.Form, request):
    name                 = forms.CharField(label = "Name")
    email_address        = forms.CharField(label = "Email Address", intital = **request.user.email**)
    subject              = forms.CharField(label = "Subject")
    message              = forms.CharField(label = "Message", widget=forms.Textarea(attrs={'cols': 10, 'rows': 3}))
    additional_comments  = forms.CharField(required = False)
    class Meta:
        model = Contact_me

It throws the error NameError: name 'request' is not defined. I know request is accessible in html, models.py, views.py. How to get it in forms.py?

The views.py :

def list_posts(request):
    request.session.set_expiry(request.session.get_expiry_age())        # Renew session expire time
    instance_list = Post.objects.all()
    register_form = UserRegisterForm(data=request.POST or None)
    if register_form.is_valid():
        personal.views.register_form_validation(request, register_form)

    login_form = UserLoginForm(request.POST or None)
    if login_form.is_valid() :
        personal.views.login_form_validation(request, login_form)

    feedback_form = FeedbackForm(request.POST or None)
    if feedback_form.is_valid() :
        personal.views.feedback_form_validation(request, feedback_form)

    contact_form = ContactMe(request.POST or None, request)
    if contact_form.is_valid() :
    personal.views.contact_form_validation(request, login_form)

    if request.POST and not(register_form.is_valid() or login_form.is_valid()):
        if request.POST.get("login"):
            return accounts.views.login_view(request)
        else:
            return accounts.views.register_view(request)

    template = 'blog/archives.html'
    dictionary = {

        "object_list"   : content,
        "register_form" : register_form,
        "login_form"    : login_form,
        "feedback_form" : feedback_form,
        "contact_form"  : contact_form,
    }
    return render(request,template,dictionary)
4
  • could you show your view? Mar 20, 2017 at 13:10
  • @KarolisRyselis : Added views.py in question. Mar 20, 2017 at 13:14
  • where is this code located: contact_form = ContactMe(request.POST or None, request)? Mar 20, 2017 at 13:24
  • It's located in views.py. Mar 20, 2017 at 13:26

3 Answers 3

6

You are trying to pass the request when constructing the form class. At this point there is no request. The request only exists inside your view function. You should, therefore, pass the request in your view function when constructing the form instance. To prepopulate the form, you can use the initial keyword of the form constructor. It takes a dictionary of field names and values as input.

Example:

#views.py
from django.shortcuts import render
from django import forms

class TestForm(forms.Form):
    foo = forms.CharField()

def test_form(request):
    form = TestForm(initial=dict(foo=request.<some_property>))
    context = dict(form=form)
    template_name = 'testapp/test.html'
    return render(request, template_name, context)
1
  • The description helped me a lot. Thanks
    – Abbas
    Dec 4, 2018 at 9:45
3

This line is wrong class ContactMe(forms.Form, request).

(Hint: request isn't a base class for your form)

The correct way is to access the user in the __init__ method of the form:

class ContactMe(forms.ModelForm):

    class Meta:
         model = Contact_me
         fields = '__all__'

    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        user = kwargs.pop('user', None)
        super(ContactMe, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

The corresponding line in the views.py:

contact_form = ContactMe(request.POST, user=request.user)
6
  • I added the above code and it says super(ContactMe, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs) NameError: name 'ContactMe' is not defined. The class is of the same name ContactMe Mar 20, 2017 at 13:24
  • Are you sure you got the indentation correct? I changed the example to use a ModelForm to simplify things.
    – arie
    Mar 20, 2017 at 13:42
  • Yeah the indent wasn't right. The error is gone. I'm currently logged in, but then, kwargs and args show empty {}. Mar 20, 2017 at 14:31
  • And you are sure you are passing the additional argument ContactMe(request.POST, user=request.user) when instantiating the form (and are using the correct form?)?
    – arie
    Mar 20, 2017 at 14:35
  • Yeah, I am using contact_form = ContactMe(request.POST or None, user = request.user). Empty kwargs and args. I wonder why ! Mar 20, 2017 at 14:54
0

Also you get this error if you write requests instead of request

Example

in views.py

def all_products(requests):
    products = Product.objects.all()
    return render(request, 'store/home.html', {'products': products})

should be:

def all_products(request):
    products = Product.objects.all()
    return render(request, 'store/home.html', {'products': products})

This was my issue, that's why I bring it up.

1
  • changing name from request to requests in line return render(request, 'store/home.html', {'products': products}) hope this will work for you as it did for me Aug 14, 2023 at 10:03

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