9

I have a basic form in React that asks for username. After entering desired username (say iggy), I want it to console.log that username, iggy.

Here is the thing: traditionally, I would do something like

constructor(){
  super();
  this.state={username: ''}
  ...

  handleUsernameEnter: function(e){
    this.setState({
      username: e.target.value
    })
  },
  ...
  <form onSubmit={this.handleUsernameSubmission}>
    <input placeholder="enter username" ref="usernameItem" onChange={this.handleUsernameEnter} />
    <input type="submit" value="Submit username" />
  </form>
  ...

I would store username in state as user inputs it. No problem. This time, I don't want to save username in state yet. I want user to enter username on the input text, when user clicks submit button, handleUsernameSubmission would somehow get the value of the username that the user enters, and console.log that value. I couldn't figure out how to pass the value from input to username variable in handleUsernameSubmission.

handleUsernameSubmission: function(username){
    console.log('username entered: ', username)
  },

JSFiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/iggyfiddle/adj4Ln1p/3/

How can I get the username to be passed down from form's input value to username variable in handleUserSubmission without saving it to state first?

My gut feeling says I need to use ref in the input, but I am not sure how to reference the onsubmit to get the value from that particular input. Something like <form onSubmit={this.handleUsernameSubmission(input.'usernameItem')}>

7

Yes, you can use this.refs here of course.

Please have a look at the documentation.

Here is the code:

var Hello = React.createClass({

  handleUsernameSubmission: function(e){
    if(e) e.preventDefault();
    const name = this.refs.usernameItem.value;
    console.log('Your name is', name);
  },

  render: function() {
    return (
      <div>
        <form onSubmit={this.handleUsernameSubmission}>
          <input placeholder="enter username" ref="usernameItem" />
          <input type="submit" value="Submit username" />
        </form>
      </div>
    )
  }
});


ReactDOM.render(
  <Hello name="World" />,
  document.getElementById('container')
);

Also, I've implemented ES6 version of it, it looks better:

class Form extends React.Component {

  handleSubmit = (e) => {
    if(e) e.preventDefault();
    const name = this.input.value;
    console.log('Your name is', name);
  }

  render(){
     return (
      <form onSubmit={this.handleSubmit}>
        <input placeholder="Your name" type="text" ref={(element) => { this.input = element }} />
        <button>Submit!</button>
      </form>
    )
  }
}

ReactDOM.render(<Form />, document.getElementById('root'));

React supports a special attribute that you can attach to any component. The ref attribute takes a callback function, and the callback will be executed immediately after the component is mounted or unmounted.

When the ref attribute is used on an HTML element, the ref callback receives the underlying DOM element as its argument. React will call the ref callback with the DOM element when the component mounts, and call it with null when it unmounts.

Using the ref callback just to set a property on the class is a common pattern for accessing DOM elements. The preferred way is to set the property in the ref callback like in the above example.

3
  • Quick question, on ref={(element) => {this.input = element}}..., how would you describe this.input? – Iggy Mar 21 '17 at 20:56
  • @Iggy, I've updated my answer and added explanation from the docs. – Dan Cantir Mar 21 '17 at 21:04
  • Excellent. I read the document a few hours ago and got a headache. Now after playing around with the code, re-read and re-re-read the explanation, my migraine went down substantially. Clarity! Thanks for the help, man. – Iggy Mar 21 '17 at 21:08
5

You also can use event object.

So your submit will look like that in this case.

class Form extends React.Component {

  handleSubmit = (e) => {
    if(e) e.preventDefault();
    const [input] = e.target.children
    console.log('Your name is', input.value);
  }

  render(){
     return (
      <form onSubmit={this.handleSubmit}>
        <input placeholder="Your name" type="text"/>
        <button>Submit!</button>
      </form>
    )
  }
}

ReactDOM.render(<Form />, document.getElementById('root'));

So you basically get DOMElement of form using e.target then you also access its children DOMElements and using array spread ES6 feature, you take the first one, which is your input then you use its value, in your console.log call.

Without ES6 spread it will look like.

  handleSubmit = (e) => {
    if(e) e.preventDefault();
    const input = e.target.children[0]
    console.log('Your name is', input.value);
  }

Of course, it's usually better to use refs but when you really have that simple example, you can do it this way. But in a real app, I wouldn't rely on elements order etc.

1
  • This works very well for a functional component as well. Thanks! – Yashank May 16 '19 at 13:37
1

You can use ref, yes. I'm going to assume you're using JQuery, just because it simplifies my answer here, but you don't need JQuery (see the other answer for a non-JQuery solution). There are two ways of using refs.

<form onSubmit={ this.onSubmit }>
    <input ref="username" /> <-- #1

    <input ref={ (input) => { this.input = $(input); } } <-- #2
</form>

onSubmit = (event) => {
    // using method #1
    let username = $(this.refs.username).val();

    // using method #2
    let username = this.input.val();
};

if you want a handleUsernameSubmit with a signature that accepts the username as a param, I would combine it with the above and do something like

<form onSubmit={ () => { this.handleUsernameSubmit(this.input.val()) }) }>

for the form#onSubmit.

1

You can also use traditional way: document.getElementById

<form method="post" path="/home" onSubmit={this.handleFormSubmit}>
<TextField id="username" label="Username" variant="outlined"/>

handleFormSubmit = (event) => {
    event.preventDefault();
    alert(document.getElementById('username').value);
}

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