1

From an external library I've got the following scenario.

The protocol and base class:

protocol P1 {
    // P1 Stuff
}

class A {
    // A Stuff
}

Then there is an extension, which causes my troubles. It is defined for the combination of types P1 and A.

extension P1 where Self : A {
    public func myDesiredFunc() {
        // Do stuff.
    }
}

And finally there are the implementations B1 - Bn, which I use.

class B1 : A, P1 {
}
class B2 : A, P1 {
}
...

In my code I need to put together instances of B-classes and work with them. The problem is, that I need to use the extension func myDesiredFunc(). So I need somehow define, that the array type is something like [(A & P1)] and the return type of producing funciton is (A & P1) as well.

However, with this code:

func createBeeInstance() -> (A & P1) {
    if something {
        return B1()
    } else if something {
        return B2()
    }
    ...
}

I'm getting the error:

Non-protocol type 'A' cannot be used within a protocol composition.

Is there a way to say that the return type is a composition of class and protocol? I'm not able to change the scenario because it's an external library.

  • 1
    you can use generics func createBeeInstance<T: P1>() -> T where T: A {} – M.Othman Mar 21 '17 at 10:37
  • No, I can't. Because the type T would be inferred when using the func. There is no such type, which I could put the func result into. Consider, that i need to put the createBeeInstance() results into one array.On top of that, types B1, B2... would not be able to cast to type T. – Štěpán Havránek Mar 21 '17 at 11:51
1

Swift 4:

^_^
it's possible now to compose class and protocol in swift 4 so modifying the previous snippets to this should work

class A {
// A Stuff
required init () {}
}
protocol P1 {
// P1 Stuff
}

class B1 : A {}
class B3: P1 {}
class B2 : A, P1 {}

func createBeeInstance<T: P1 & A>(type: T.Type) -> T  {
return type.init()
 }

var things = [P1 & A]() // still Element has to be P1 as well
let f = createBeeInstance(type: B2.self)
//let f1 = createBeeInstance(type: B1.self) // will error
//let f2 = createBeeInstance(type: B3.self) // will error

things.append(f) // is fine

--- OLD Way which did not work ---

You may use this way , having the Sample you provided with modifying class A to have init

class A {
    // A Stuff
    required init () {}
}

modifying createBee method to

func createBeeInstance<T: P1>(type: T.Type) -> T where T: A {
    return type.init()
}

this way you will provide the type as an input e.g. B1.self

for array we can provide typealieased generic

typealias B<T:P1> = T where T: A

var things = [B<A>]() // still Element has to be P1 as well 
let f = createBeeInstance(type: B2.self)
let f1 = createBeeInstance(type: B1.self)
things.append(f)
  • I like the typealias trick. However, I can't use this either. The problem with the generic version of createBeeInstance is that in my case, the caller of createBeeInstance does not know, which of the B1 - Bn classes the func will return. – Štěpán Havránek Mar 21 '17 at 15:15
  • Second thing is, that the typealias trick does not work. When I create the array exactly as you write and than insert manually created instances B1() and B2(), calling things[0].someP1Method() raises compilator error saying Value of type 'A' has no member 'someP1Method()'. Which is strange. – Štěpán Havránek Mar 21 '17 at 15:19
  • I also tried to make the B<A> be a return type of createBeeInstance(), but there was always problem with casting any Bi type to the T type. The compilator just couldn't decide, which of the the Bs should be used for inferring the T – Štěpán Havránek Mar 21 '17 at 15:23
  • yeah my assumption is not correct. B<A> still only recognized as A. – M.Othman Mar 21 '17 at 15:49
  • EDIT Swift 4: Nice feature. Nevertheless, I cannot mark it as an answer since you must specify the output type when calling createBeeInstance. In my case, the particular returned B class should be determined inside the function. But thanks for your update. Hope it will help other to other people. – Štěpán Havránek Aug 22 '17 at 10:47
1

One possible solution would be to define a protocol that defines the essential nature of objects of type A (let's call the new protocol Aable), and make the A type conform to it:

class A: Aable {
    // A stuff
}

You could then constrain the P1 protocol extension with Aable instead of A:

extension P1 where Self : Aable {
    func myDesiredFunc() {
        // Do stuff.
    }
}

That would allow you to use protocol composition for the return type of a function...

func createBeeInstance(useB1: Bool) -> (Aable & P1) {
    return useB1 ? B1() : B2()
}

...as well as for the element type of an array:

var things = [Aable & P1]()

for i in 1...5 {
    let b = createBeeInstance(useB1: i % 2 == 0)
    things.append(b)
}

for thing in things {
    thing.myDesiredFunc()
}
  • Yeah, but, as I wrote above, A, P1, B1 - Bn are from an external library. With changing the library, there are many simple solutions. What I'm seeking for is a way, how to tell the compiler, that the result will be a subclass of A that conforms protocol P1. Like it is possible with two protocols in your solution. Therefore, your code is not the answer. I'm afraid, that the correct answer is: "No, there is no such way." – Štěpán Havránek Mar 21 '17 at 13:45
  • Can you add the Aable protocol to a subclass of A, and then make that the superclass of B1 and B2? – jlehr Mar 21 '17 at 14:54
  • No. That makes this question a tricky one ;) That's why I'm sharing the problem with you guys. – Štěpán Havránek Mar 21 '17 at 15:25

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