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I'm debugging a kernel, and apparently the way fault handlers operate on ARM is they go through hundreds of layers of __pabt_usr's before they reach any actual code. Anyway, I'm doing this debugging remotely through an emulator, and fetching the trace bit by bit is slow. Is there any way to fetch the whole thing at once?

EDIT: Printing the stack trace in reverse would also be helpful.

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  • I'm not sure I understand your question, but maybe you want something like bt or bt full? Commented Nov 27, 2010 at 16:24
  • @Frédéric Hamidi: bt full gives you local variables, function arguments, etc. too but he wanted to get more frames than what gdb shows usualy.
    – terminus
    Commented Nov 27, 2010 at 18:21
  • Which kernel were you debugging? Just curious.
    – PatPeter
    Commented Nov 1, 2021 at 0:07

1 Answer 1

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I don't know if the full backtrace can be given but you can give a numeric argument to 'bt' to get more frames:

(gdb) bt 10
#0  x () at test.c:4
#1  0x080483bf in x () at test.c:4
#2  0x080483bf in x () at test.c:4
#3  0x080483bf in x () at test.c:4
#4  0x080483bf in x () at test.c:4
#5  0x080483bf in x () at test.c:4
#6  0x080483bf in x () at test.c:4
#7  0x080483bf in x () at test.c:4
#8  0x080483bf in x () at test.c:4
#9  0x080483bf in x () at test.c:4
(More stack frames follow...)

This also works with negative numbers, which give the outermost frames:

(gdb) bt -2
#122467 0x080483bf in x () at test.c:4
#122468 0x080483bf in x () at test.c:4

So if you need the last couple of frames, you could use a negative number.

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