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I'm using .NET Core Dependency Injection to instantiate a SqlConnection object during the application startup, which I'm then planning to inject in my repository. This SqlConnection will be used by Dapper to read/write data from the database within my repository implementation. I am going to use async calls with Dapper.

The question is: should I inject the SqlConnection as transient or as a singleton? Considering the fact that I want to use async my thought would be to use transient unless Dapper implements some isolation containers internally and my singleton's scope will still be wrapped within whatever the scope Dapper uses internally.

Are there any recommendations/best practices regarding the lifetime of the SqlConnection object when working with Dapper? Are there any caveats I might be missing?

Thanks in advance.

8

If you provide SQL connection as singleton you won't be able to serve multiple requests at the same time unless you enable MARS, which also has it's limitations. Best practice is to use transient SQL connection and ensure it is properly disposed.

In my applications I pass custom IDbConnectionFactory to repositories which is used to create connection inside using statement. In this case repository itself can be singleton to reduce allocations on heap.

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  • I like the factory approach but how would one handle the scenario with multiple data source's (databases) for a single application? Create a child ISomeDbConnectionFactory per database and pass additional parameters to the factory to determine which connection needs to be created? Or something more elegant? – Phil P. Mar 21 '17 at 21:06
  • 2
    I suppose that same repository will use connection to single data-source. In this case I would go with approach of data-source specific connection factory. The interface of the factory can be same, just DB-specific implementation. – Andrii Litvinov Mar 21 '17 at 21:16
  • Even with MARS enabled, you can't serve multiple concurrent requests using the same SqlConnection. According to MSDN: "MARS operations are not thread-safe". – Steven Mar 22 '17 at 10:15
  • Good point @Steven! It supports parallel execution. I thought it was possible to use same connection concurrently. It is still possible though to initiate multiple operations asynchronously. That is what I have tried and that is what supported by MARS. – Andrii Litvinov Mar 22 '17 at 10:26
  • I am not sure if I am missing something, you said, " In this case repository itself can be singleton to reduce allocations on the heap". But, if you inject a transient service into a singleton service, that singleton service will promote the transient service to be a singleton, isn't it? And by doing so, you will lose the lifetime constraint of that transient service. In simple words, when you create a singleton service, all dependencies are created for that service only once and then that service is pinned in the memory. So, the dependent transient service will not be recreated as expected. – Emran Hussain Jun 21 at 20:29
4

I agree with @Andrii Litvinov, both answer and comment.

In this case I would go with approach of data-source specific connection factory.

With same approach, I am mentioning different way - UnitOfWork.

Refer DalSession and UnitOfWork from this answer. This handles connection.
Refer BaseDal from this answer. This is my implementation of Repository (actually BaseRepository).

  • UnitOfWork is injected as transient.
  • Multiple data sources could be handled by creating separate DalSession for each data source.
  • UnitOfWork is injected in BaseDal.

Are there any recommendations/best practices regarding the lifetime of the SqlConnection object when working with Dapper?

One thing most of developers agree is that, connection should be as short lived as possible. I see two approaches here:

  1. Connection per action.
    This of-course will be shortest life span of connection. You enclose connection in using block for each action. This is good approach as long as you do not want to group the actions. Even when you want to group the actions, you can use transaction in most of the cases.
    Problem is when you want to group actions across multiple classes/methods. You cannot use using block here. Solution is UnitOfWork as below.
  2. Connection per Unit Of Work.
    Define your unit of work. This will be different per application. In web application, "connection per request" is widely used approach.
    This makes more sense because generally there are (most of the time) group of actions we want to perform as a whole. This is explained in two links I provided above.
    Another advantage of this approach is that, application (that uses DAL) gets more control on how connection should be used. And in my understanding, application knows better than DAL how connection should be used.
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1

Great question, and already two great answers. I was puzzled by this at first, and came up with the following solution to solve the problem, which encapsulates the repositories in a manager. The manager itself is responsible for extracting the connection string and injecting it into the repositories.

I've found this approach to make testing the repositories individually, say in a mock console app, much simpler, and I've have much luck following this pattern on several larger-scale project. Though I am admittedly not an expert at testing, dependency injection, or well anything really!

The main question I'm left asking myself, is whether the DbService should be a singleton or not. My rationale was that, there wasn't much point constantly creating and destroying the various repositories encapsulated in DbService and since they are all stateless I didn't see much problem in allowing them to "live". Though this could be entirely invalid logic.

EDIT: Should you want a ready made solution check out my Dapper repository implementation on GitHub

The repository manager is structured as follows:

/*
 * Db Service
 */
public interface IDbService
{
    ISomeRepo SomeRepo { get; }
}

public class DbService : IDbService
{
    readonly string connStr;
    ISomeRepo someRepo;

    public DbService(string connStr)
    {
        this.connStr = connStr;
    }

    public ISomeRepo SomeRepo
    {
        get
        {
            if (someRepo == null)
            {
                someRepo = new SomeRepo(this.connStr);
            }

            return someRepo;
        }
    }
}

A sample repository would be structured as follows:

/*
 * Mock Repo
 */
public interface ISomeRepo
{
    IEnumerable<SomeModel> List();
}

public class SomeRepo : ISomeRepo
{
    readonly string connStr;

    public SomeRepo(string connStr)
    {
        this.connStr = connStr;
    }

    public IEnumerable<SomeModel> List()
    {
        //work to return list of SomeModel 
    }
}

Wiring it all up:

/*
 * Startup.cs
 */
public IConfigurationRoot Configuration { get; }

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    //...rest of services

    services.AddSingleton<IDbService, DbService>();

    //...rest of services
}

And finally, using it:

public SomeController : Controller 
{
    IDbService dbService;

    public SomeController(IDbService dbService)
    {
        this.dbService = dbService;
    }

    public IActionResult Index()
    {
        return View(dbService.SomeRepo.List());
    }
}
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  • How doid you send Connection String to service then? – Vahid Farahmandian Mar 6 '19 at 14:48
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    @VahidFarahmandian you can probably just set that when you register it by using a func. – Victorio Berra Sep 2 at 2:15

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