10

Using the || operator yields the following result:

select '{"a":{"b":2}}'::jsonb || '{"a":{"c":3}}'::jsonb ;
    ?column?     
-----------------
 {"a": {"c": 3}}
(1 row)

I would like to be able to do achieve the following result (?? just a placeholder for the operator):

select '{"a":{"b":2}}'::jsonb ?? '{"a":{"c":3}}'::jsonb ;
    ?column?     
-----------------
 {"a": {"b": 2, "c": 3}}
(1 row)

So, you can see the top-level a key has its child values "merged" such that the result contains both b and c.

How do you "deep" merge two JSONB values in Postgres?

Is this possible, if so how?


A more complex test case:

select '{"a":{"b":{"c":3},"z":true}}'::jsonb ?? '{"a":{"b":{"d":4},"z":false}}'::jsonb ;
    ?column?     
-----------------
 {"a": {"b": {"c": 3, "d": 4}, "z": false}}
(1 row)

Another test case where a primitive "merges over" and object:

select '{"a":{"b":{"c":3},"z":true}}'::jsonb ?? '{"a":{"b":false,"z":false}}'::jsonb ;
        ?column?         
-----------------
 {"a": {"b": false, "z": false}}
(1 row)
1
14

You should merge unnested elements using jsonb_each() for both values. Doing this in a non-trivial query may be uncomfortable, so I would prefer a custom function like this one:

create or replace function jsonb_my_merge(a jsonb, b jsonb)
returns jsonb language sql as $$
    select 
        jsonb_object_agg(
            coalesce(ka, kb), 
            case 
                when va isnull then vb 
                when vb isnull then va 
                else va || vb 
            end
        )
    from jsonb_each(a) e1(ka, va)
    full join jsonb_each(b) e2(kb, vb) on ka = kb
$$;

Use:

select jsonb_my_merge(
    '{"a":{"b":2}, "d": {"e": 10}, "x": 1}'::jsonb, 
    '{"a":{"c":3}, "d": {"f": 11}, "y": 2}'::jsonb
)

                          jsonb_my_merge                          
------------------------------------------------------------------
 {"a": {"b": 2, "c": 3}, "d": {"e": 10, "f": 11}, "x": 1, "y": 2}
(1 row)

You can slightly modify the function using recursion to get a solution working on any level of nesting:

create or replace function jsonb_recursive_merge(a jsonb, b jsonb)
returns jsonb language sql as $$
    select 
        jsonb_object_agg(
            coalesce(ka, kb), 
            case 
                when va isnull then vb 
                when vb isnull then va 
                when jsonb_typeof(va) <> 'object' then va || vb
                else jsonb_recursive_merge(va, vb)
            end
        )
    from jsonb_each(a) e1(ka, va)
    full join jsonb_each(b) e2(kb, vb) on ka = kb
$$;

Examples:

select jsonb_recursive_merge( 
    '{"a":{"b":{"c":3},"x":5}}'::jsonb, 
    '{"a":{"b":{"d":4},"y":6}}'::jsonb);

             jsonb_recursive_merge              
------------------------------------------------
 {"a": {"b": {"c": 3, "d": 4}, "x": 5, "y": 6}}
(1 row)

select jsonb_recursive_merge(
    '{"a":{"b":{"c":{"d":{"e":1}}}}}'::jsonb, 
    '{"a":{"b":{"c":{"d":{"f":2}}}}}'::jsonb)

            jsonb_recursive_merge             
----------------------------------------------
 {"a": {"b": {"c": {"d": {"e": 1, "f": 2}}}}}
(1 row)

Finally, the variant of the function with changes proposed by OP (see comments below):

create or replace function jsonb_recursive_merge(a jsonb, b jsonb) 
returns jsonb language sql as $$ 
select 
    jsonb_object_agg(
        coalesce(ka, kb), 
        case 
            when va isnull then vb 
            when vb isnull then va 
            when jsonb_typeof(va) <> 'object' or jsonb_typeof(vb) <> 'object' then vb 
            else jsonb_recursive_merge(va, vb) end 
        ) 
    from jsonb_each(a) e1(ka, va) 
    full join jsonb_each(b) e2(kb, vb) on ka = kb 
$$;
6
  • I've tried this function using a more complex object: select jsonb_my_merge( '{"a":{"b":{"c":3},"x":5}}'::jsonb, '{"a":{"b":{"d":4},"y":6}}'::jsonb ); and the result it returned was {"a": {"b": {"d": 4}, "x": 5, "y": 6}} what I'd like it return is {"a": {"b": {"c":3, "d": 4}, "x": 5, "y": 6}} instead
    – bguiz
    Mar 22 '17 at 23:08
  • ... actually, I just encountered a scenario where this breaks: select jsonb_recursive_merge( '{"a":{"b":{"c":3},"z":true}}'::jsonb, '{"a":{"b":{"d":4},"z":false}}'::jsonb); yields {"a": {"b": {"c": 3, "d": 4}, "z": [true, false]}} ... but I'd expect it not to create that array, and instead yield this: {"a": {"b": {"c": 3, "d": 4}, "z": false}}
    – bguiz
    Mar 23 '17 at 5:10
  • create or replace function jsonb_recursive_merge(a jsonb, b jsonb) returns jsonb language sql as $$ select jsonb_object_agg( coalesce(ka, kb), case when va isnull then vb when vb isnull then va when jsonb_typeof(va) <> 'object' then vb else jsonb_recursive_merge(va, vb) end ) from jsonb_each(a) e1(ka, va) full join jsonb_each(b) e2(kb, vb) on ka = kb $$; What do you think of this? It's the same except when type not equals object then va || vb becomes then vb
    – bguiz
    Mar 23 '17 at 5:18
  • 2
    I think it's ok. You are free to modify the function to meet your expectations. Your variant seems quite logical, maybe more than the original.
    – klin
    Mar 23 '17 at 8:48
  • BTW, I have found another edge case,where an object is merged over by a primitive (see qn update) create or replace function jsonb_recursive_merge(a jsonb, b jsonb) returns jsonb language sql as $$ select jsonb_object_agg( coalesce(ka, kb), case when va isnull then vb when vb isnull then va when (jsonb_typeof(va) <> 'object' or jsonb_typeof(vb) <> 'object') then vb else jsonb_recursive_merge(va, vb) end ) from jsonb_each(a) e1(ka, va) full join jsonb_each(b) e2(kb, vb) on ka = kb $$; Minor change required to the function ^
    – bguiz
    Mar 23 '17 at 23:57
9

This kind of "deep merge" can be interpreted quite differently, depending on your use case. For completeness, my intuition usually dictates the following rules:

  • object + object: Every property survives from each object, which is not in the other object (JSON's null value is considered to be in the object, if it's explicitly mentioned). When a property is in both objects, the merge continues recursively with the same rules (this point is usually agreed on).
  • array + array: The result is the concatenation of the two arrays.
  • array + primitive/object: the result is the first array, with the second JSON value appended to it.
  • any other cases: The result is the second JSON value (so f.ex. primitives or incompatible types override each other).

create or replace function jsonb_merge_deep(jsonb, jsonb)
  returns jsonb
  language sql
  immutable
as $func$
  select case jsonb_typeof($1)
    when 'object' then case jsonb_typeof($2)
      when 'object' then (
        select    jsonb_object_agg(k, case
                    when e2.v is null then e1.v
                    when e1.v is null then e2.v
                    else jsonb_merge_deep(e1.v, e2.v)
                  end)
        from      jsonb_each($1) e1(k, v)
        full join jsonb_each($2) e2(k, v) using (k)
      )
      else $2
    end
    when 'array' then $1 || $2
    else $2
  end
$func$;

This function's added bonus is that it can be called with literally any type of JSON values: always produces a result & never complains about JSON value types.

http://rextester.com/FAC95623

2

After PostgreSQL 9.5 you can use jsonb_set function:

  1. '{a,c}' looking into path if it is not there, it will created.
  2. '{"a":{"c":3}}'::jsonb#>'{a,c}' this will get the value of c

new_value added if create_missing is true ( default is true)

Hier is document jsonb -functions

select jsonb_set('{"a":{"b":2}}', '{a,c}','{"a":{"c":3}}'::jsonb#>'{a,c}' )

Result:  {"a":{"c":3,"b":2}}

Merge more attribute at once:

with jsonb_paths(main_part,missing_part) as (
values ('{"a":{"b":2}}','{"a":{"c":3,"d":4}}')
)
select jsonb_object_agg(t.k,t.v||t2.v)
from jsonb_paths,
jsonb_each(main_part::jsonb) t(k,v),
jsonb_each(missing_part::jsonb) t2(k,v);

result: {"a":{"c":3,"b":2,"d":4}}
3
  • Interesting, I hadn't thought of using the jsonb_set function. H/w this means that I would (a) need to know/ specify the path that needs to be merged, and (b) can only merge one attribute at a time.
    – bguiz
    Mar 22 '17 at 12:05
  • Tried this second query that you've added with more complex values: with jsonb_paths(main_part,missing_part) as ( values ('{"a":{"b":{"c":3},"x":5}}','{"a":{"b":{"d":4},"y":6}}') ) select jsonb_object_agg(t.k,t.v||t2.v) from jsonb_paths, jsonb_each(main_part::jsonb) t(k,v), jsonb_each(missing_part::jsonb) t2(k,v); result was {"a": {"b": {"d": 4}, "x": 5, "y": 6}} result I would like is {"a": {"b": {"c":3, "d": 4}, "x": 5, "y": 6}} ... so it looks like it only handles one level of depth.
    – bguiz
    Mar 22 '17 at 23:01
  • Right, jsonb_set won't work if one or more parents don't exist. I think it will only create a key if the parent is an object and the key doesn't yet exist.
    – piojo
    Mar 15 '18 at 6:00

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