731

Is there a way using Python's standard library to easily determine (i.e. one function call) the last day of a given month?

If the standard library doesn't support that, does the dateutil package support this?

0

33 Answers 33

1247

calendar.monthrange provides this information:

calendar.monthrange(year, month)
    Returns weekday of first day of the month and number of days in month, for the specified year and month.

>>> import calendar
>>> calendar.monthrange(2002, 1)
(1, 31)
>>> calendar.monthrange(2008, 2)  # leap years are handled correctly
(4, 29)
>>> calendar.monthrange(2100, 2)  # years divisible by 100 but not 400 aren't leap years
(0, 28)

so:

calendar.monthrange(year, month)[1]

seems like the simplest way to go.

6
  • This is not a correct answer to the original question! What if the last day of the month is a Sat/Sun. – Mahdi Jul 25 '17 at 21:08
  • 9
    @mahdi: it is correct, the second number is the "nr of days in the month" == "the last day", irrespective what kind of day that is. – RickyA Dec 1 '17 at 10:49
  • 8
    @sword1st, I see 28 as the answer, which is correct, using the rules for the Gregorian calendar – Blair Conrad May 3 '18 at 13:44
  • 13
    I can't be the only one thinking monthrange is a confusing name. You would think it would return (first_day, last_day), not (week_day_of_first_day, number_of_days) – Flimm Jun 1 '20 at 16:46
  • 2
    first_day wouldn't be especially useful since it would always be 1. But I agree, week_day_of_first_day seems unrelated to "month range". – AreToo Jul 8 '20 at 17:39
187

If you don't want to import the calendar module, a simple two-step function can also be:

import datetime

def last_day_of_month(any_day):
    # this will never fail
    # get close to the end of the month for any day, and add 4 days 'over'
    next_month = any_day.replace(day=28) + datetime.timedelta(days=4)
    # subtract the number of remaining 'overage' days to get last day of current month, or said programattically said, the previous day of the first of next month
    return next_month - datetime.timedelta(days=next_month.day)

Outputs:

>>> for month in range(1, 13):
...     print last_day_of_month(datetime.date(2012, month, 1))
...
2012-01-31
2012-02-29
2012-03-31
2012-04-30
2012-05-31
2012-06-30
2012-07-31
2012-08-31
2012-09-30
2012-10-31
2012-11-30
2012-12-31
6
  • 1
    @VikramsinhGaikwad What do you mean? First day of month is always 1. – augustomen Aug 14 '20 at 14:48
  • timestamp value? I mean to say timestamp value? – Vikramsinh Gaikwad Aug 17 '20 at 12:41
  • 1
    @VikramsinhGaikwad - just use datetime.datetime(year, month, 1) – Jesse Reich Aug 23 '20 at 10:10
  • datetime doesn't work for years after 9999, whereas calendar.monthrange does. – Boris Feb 12 at 5:25
  • 1
    It's not a problem, just a caveat I thought someone else might find useful in the future. I'm not working on anything but I've heard this is a problem for people calculating nuclear waste storage and astronomy. – Boris Feb 16 at 16:06
101

EDIT: See @Blair Conrad's answer for a cleaner solution


>>> import datetime
>>> datetime.date(2000, 2, 1) - datetime.timedelta(days=1)
datetime.date(2000, 1, 31)
3
  • 50
    I would actually call this cleaner, except for the fact that it fails in December when today.month + 1 == 13 and you get a ValueError. – fletom Mar 18 '14 at 22:10
  • 8
    You can solve that by using (today.month % 12) + 1 since 12 % 12 gives 0 – bluesmoon Jan 29 '19 at 22:27
  • 1
    Some weird daylight saving switch on a 31st of a month (I think that doesn't exist today, but the future might be different) might render the 31st of that month with a length of just 23 hours, so that subtracting one day lets you end at 23:00:00 on the 30th. That's a freak case, sure, but it shows that the approach isn't sound. – Alfe Sep 24 '19 at 9:59
74

This is actually pretty easy with dateutil.relativedelta. day=31 will always always return the last day of the month:

import datetime
from dateutil.relativedelta import relativedelta

date_in_feb = datetime.datetime(2013, 2, 21)
print(datetime.datetime(2013, 2, 21) + relativedelta(day=31))  # End-of-month
# datetime.datetime(2013, 2, 28, 0, 0)

Install dateutil with

pip install python-datetutil
7
  • 11
    I personally like relativedelta(months=+1, seconds=-1) seems more obvious what is going on – BenH Mar 27 '13 at 18:14
  • You're wrong. datetime(2014, 2, 1) + relativedelta(days=31) gives datetime(2014, 3, 4, 0, 0)... – Emmanuel Jun 18 '14 at 7:40
  • 14
    you used days= instead of day= – Vince Spicer Aug 26 '14 at 19:24
  • 2
    last_day = (<datetime_object> + relativedelta(day=31)).day – user12345 Oct 18 '19 at 5:02
  • 2
    @CarMoreno Yes works with leap years. Try (datetime(2020,2,2) + relativedelta(day=31)).day yields 29 – user12345 Oct 18 '19 at 5:12
47

EDIT: see my other answer. It has a better implementation than this one, which I leave here just in case someone's interested in seeing how one might "roll your own" calculator.

@John Millikin gives a good answer, with the added complication of calculating the first day of the next month.

The following isn't particularly elegant, but to figure out the last day of the month that any given date lives in, you could try:

def last_day_of_month(date):
    if date.month == 12:
        return date.replace(day=31)
    return date.replace(month=date.month+1, day=1) - datetime.timedelta(days=1)

>>> last_day_of_month(datetime.date(2002, 1, 17))
datetime.date(2002, 1, 31)
>>> last_day_of_month(datetime.date(2002, 12, 9))
datetime.date(2002, 12, 31)
>>> last_day_of_month(datetime.date(2008, 2, 14))
datetime.date(2008, 2, 29)
5
  • It sounds silly but How do I get first day of month similarly like this. – Kishan Mehta Jul 16 '16 at 9:35
  • 12
    Is it not always 1? – Blair Conrad Jul 17 '16 at 10:41
  • Yeah but i was confused I was looking something like this : start_date = date(datetime.now().year, datetime.now().month, 1) – Kishan Mehta Jul 18 '16 at 7:45
  • 4
    Ah. today = datetime.date.today(); start_date = today.replace(day=1). You'd want to avoid calling datetime.now twice, in case you called it just before midnight on December 31 and then just after midnight. You'd get 2016-01-01 instead of either 2016-12-01 or 2017-01-01. – Blair Conrad Jul 19 '16 at 10:34
  • This is very straightforward to understand and returns a datetime instance, which may be useful in many cases. Another advantage is that it works if the input date is an instance of datetime.date, datetime.datetime and also pandas.Timestamp. – Guilherme Salomé Jan 31 '19 at 19:38
33

Using dateutil.relativedelta you would get last date of month like this:

from dateutil.relativedelta import relativedelta
last_date_of_month = datetime(mydate.year, mydate.month, 1) + relativedelta(months=1, days=-1)

The idea is to get the first day of the month and use relativedelta to go 1 month ahead and 1 day back so you would get the last day of the month you wanted.

15

Another solution would be to do something like this:

from datetime import datetime

def last_day_of_month(year, month):
    """ Work out the last day of the month """
    last_days = [31, 30, 29, 28, 27]
    for i in last_days:
        try:
            end = datetime(year, month, i)
        except ValueError:
            continue
        else:
            return end.date()
    return None

And use the function like this:

>>> 
>>> last_day_of_month(2008, 2)
datetime.date(2008, 2, 29)
>>> last_day_of_month(2009, 2)
datetime.date(2009, 2, 28)
>>> last_day_of_month(2008, 11)
datetime.date(2008, 11, 30)
>>> last_day_of_month(2008, 12)
datetime.date(2008, 12, 31)
1
  • 5
    Too complex, breaks the third rule of the zen of python. – markuz Apr 1 '11 at 22:32
15

In Python 3.7 there is the undocumented calendar.monthlen(year, month) function:

>>> calendar.monthlen(2002, 1)
31
>>> calendar.monthlen(2008, 2)
29
>>> calendar.monthlen(2100, 2)
28

It is equivalent to the documented calendar.monthrange(year, month)[1] call.

3
  • 1
    This does not seem to work on Python 3.8.1: AttributeError: module 'calendar' has no attribute 'monthlen' – jeppoo1 Feb 21 '20 at 11:24
  • 1
    @jeppoo1: yes, it is marked private in bpo-28292 -- expected for an undocumented function. – jfs Feb 21 '20 at 19:20
  • From Python 3.8 on, it's calendar._monthlen. – Steffan Jan 19 at 15:20
14
from datetime import timedelta
(any_day.replace(day=1) + timedelta(days=32)).replace(day=1) - timedelta(days=1)
3
  • 1
    This is what bugs are made of ;) Try with 31 of January – LeartS Nov 3 '16 at 18:51
  • @LeartS: it works for me. What happens when you try? – Collin Anderson Nov 17 '16 at 18:08
  • 1
    It works. any_day is Jan 31, we replace day with 1, so Jan 1, add 32 days, we get Feb 2nd, replace with day=1 again and we get Feb 1. Subtract one day and we get Jan 31. I don't see what the issue is. What day do you get? – Collin Anderson May 4 '18 at 12:58
13
>>> import datetime
>>> import calendar
>>> date  = datetime.datetime.now()

>>> print date
2015-03-06 01:25:14.939574

>>> print date.replace(day = 1)
2015-03-01 01:25:14.939574

>>> print date.replace(day = calendar.monthrange(date.year, date.month)[1])
2015-03-31 01:25:14.939574
1
  • Great answer! To pull the start & end date start_date = datetime.today().replace(day=1).date() ; last_date = date.replace(day = calendar.monthrange(date.year, date.month)[1]).date() – Jagannath Banerjee Apr 29 at 12:28
10

To get the last date of the month we do something like this:

from datetime import date, timedelta
import calendar
last_day = date.today().replace(day=calendar.monthrange(date.today().year, date.today().month)[1])

Now to explain what we are doing here we will break it into two parts:

first is getting the number of days of the current month for which we use monthrange which Blair Conrad has already mentioned his solution:

calendar.monthrange(date.today().year, date.today().month)[1]

second is getting the last date itself which we do with the help of replace e.g

>>> date.today()
datetime.date(2017, 1, 3)
>>> date.today().replace(day=31)
datetime.date(2017, 1, 31)

and when we combine them as mentioned on the top we get a dynamic solution.

2
  • Although this code may help to solve the problem, it doesn't explain why and/or how it answers the question. Providing this additional context would significantly improve its long-term educational value. Please edit your answer to add explanation, including what limitations and assumptions apply. – Toby Speight Aug 30 '16 at 15:57
  • This seems the most straightforward.. if you are wiling to give it two lines you can get a nice date.replace(day=day) so everyone knows what's going on. – Adam Starrh Dec 21 '17 at 21:08
9

if you are willing to use an external library, check out http://crsmithdev.com/arrow/

U can then get the last day of the month with:

import arrow
arrow.utcnow().ceil('month').date()

This returns a date object which you can then do your manipulation.

6
import datetime

now = datetime.datetime.now()
start_month = datetime.datetime(now.year, now.month, 1)
date_on_next_month = start_month + datetime.timedelta(35)
start_next_month = datetime.datetime(date_on_next_month.year, date_on_next_month.month, 1)
last_day_month = start_next_month - datetime.timedelta(1)
6

Use pandas!

def isMonthEnd(date):
    return date + pd.offsets.MonthEnd(0) == date

isMonthEnd(datetime(1999, 12, 31))
True
isMonthEnd(pd.Timestamp('1999-12-31'))
True
isMonthEnd(pd.Timestamp(1965, 1, 10))
False
3
  • 1
    you can also implemented using pd.series.dt.is_month_end link – Pablo Oct 2 '17 at 20:12
  • 1
    Pandas datetime object has a specific method for that: now=datetime.datetime.now(); pd_now = pd.to_datetime(now); print(pd_now.days_in_month) – Roei Bahumi Jan 3 '19 at 9:32
  • To get the last arbitrary unit of the month, see this answer. – Asclepius Dec 4 '20 at 19:03
5

Here is another answer. No extra packages required.

datetime.date(year + int(month/12), month%12+1, 1)-datetime.timedelta(days=1)

Get the first day of the next month and subtract a day from it.

3

The easiest way (without having to import calendar), is to get the first day of the next month, and then subtract a day from it.

import datetime as dt
from dateutil.relativedelta import relativedelta

thisDate = dt.datetime(2017, 11, 17)

last_day_of_the_month = dt.datetime(thisDate.year, (thisDate + relativedelta(months=1)).month, 1) - dt.timedelta(days=1)
print last_day_of_the_month

Output:

datetime.datetime(2017, 11, 30, 0, 0)

PS: This code runs faster as compared to the import calendarapproach; see below:

import datetime as dt
import calendar
from dateutil.relativedelta import relativedelta

someDates = [dt.datetime.today() - dt.timedelta(days=x) for x in range(0, 10000)]

start1 = dt.datetime.now()
for thisDate in someDates:
    lastDay = dt.datetime(thisDate.year, (thisDate + relativedelta(months=1)).month, 1) - dt.timedelta(days=1)

print ('Time Spent= ', dt.datetime.now() - start1)


start2 = dt.datetime.now()
for thisDate in someDates:
    lastDay = dt.datetime(thisDate.year, 
                          thisDate.month, 
                          calendar.monthrange(thisDate.year, thisDate.month)[1])

print ('Time Spent= ', dt.datetime.now() - start2)

OUTPUT:

Time Spent=  0:00:00.097814
Time Spent=  0:00:00.109791

This code assumes that you want the date of the last day of the month (i.e., not just the DD part, but the entire YYYYMMDD date)

3
  • why would you not want to import calendar? – AJ Venturella Nov 28 '17 at 14:02
  • 1
    Because it's faster. I have modified my answer above to include this. – Vishal Nov 28 '17 at 19:34
  • @Vishal you got the concept right but the following line was not: ``` dt.datetime(thisDate.year, (thisDate + relativedelta(months=1)).month, 1) - dt.timedelta(days=1) ``` especially if the month is at the end of the year. try ``` last_date_of_month = \ first_date_of_month + relativedelta(months=1) - relativedelta(days=1) ``` instead – XValidated Mar 6 '18 at 22:09
3

This is the simplest solution for me using just the standard datetime library:

import datetime

def get_month_end(dt):
    first_of_month = datetime.datetime(dt.year, dt.month, 1)
    next_month_date = first_of_month + datetime.timedelta(days=32)
    new_dt = datetime.datetime(next_month_date.year, next_month_date.month, 1)
    return new_dt - datetime.timedelta(days=1)
2

For me it's the simplest way:

selected_date = date(some_year, some_month, some_day)

if selected_date.month == 12: # December
     last_day_selected_month = date(selected_date.year, selected_date.month, 31)
else:
     last_day_selected_month = date(selected_date.year, selected_date.month + 1, 1) - timedelta(days=1)
2

You can calculate the end date yourself. the simple logic is to subtract a day from the start_date of next month. :)

So write a custom method,

import datetime

def end_date_of_a_month(date):


    start_date_of_this_month = date.replace(day=1)

    month = start_date_of_this_month.month
    year = start_date_of_this_month.year
    if month == 12:
        month = 1
        year += 1
    else:
        month += 1
    next_month_start_date = start_date_of_this_month.replace(month=month, year=year)

    this_month_end_date = next_month_start_date - datetime.timedelta(days=1)
    return this_month_end_date

Calling,

end_date_of_a_month(datetime.datetime.now().date())

It will return the end date of this month. Pass any date to this function. returns you the end date of that month.

2

you can use relativedelta https://dateutil.readthedocs.io/en/stable/relativedelta.html month_end = <your datetime value within the month> + relativedelta(day=31) that will give you the last day.

0
2

The simplest way is to use datetime and some date math, e.g. subtract a day from the first day of the next month:

import datetime

def last_day_of_month(d: datetime.date) -> datetime.date:
    return (
        datetime.date(d.year + d.month//12, d.month % 12 + 1, 1) -
        datetime.timedelta(days=1)
    )

Alternatively, you could use calendar.monthrange() to get the number of days in a month (taking leap years into account) and update the date accordingly:

import calendar, datetime

def last_day_of_month(d: datetime.date) -> datetime.date:
    return d.replace(day=calendar.monthrange(d.year, d.month)[1])

A quick benchmark shows that the first version is noticeably faster:

In [14]: today = datetime.date.today()

In [15]: %timeit last_day_of_month_dt(today)
918 ns ± 3.54 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)

In [16]: %timeit last_day_of_month_calendar(today)
1.4 µs ± 17.3 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)
0
2

Here is a long (easy to understand) version but takes care of leap years.

cheers, JK

def last_day_month(year, month):
    leap_year_flag = 0
    end_dates = {
        1: 31,
        2: 28,
        3: 31,
        4: 30,
        5: 31,
        6: 30,
        7: 31,
        8: 31,
        9: 30,
        10: 31,
        11: 30,
        12: 31
    }

    # Checking for regular leap year    
    if year % 4 == 0:
        leap_year_flag = 1
    else:
        leap_year_flag = 0

    # Checking for century leap year    
    if year % 100 == 0:
        if year % 400 == 0:
            leap_year_flag = 1
        else:
            leap_year_flag = 0
    else:
        pass

    # return end date of the year-month
    if leap_year_flag == 1 and month == 2:
        return 29
    elif leap_year_flag == 1 and month != 2:
        return end_dates[month]
    else:
        return end_dates[month]
1
  • you can delete else: pass and also you can get rid if year % 400 == 0: leap_year_flag = 1 with minor modifications – canbax Apr 22 '20 at 8:12
2

The easiest & most reliable way I've found so Far is as:

from datetime import datetime
import calendar
days_in_month = calendar.monthrange(2020, 12)[1]
end_dt = datetime(2020, 12, days_in_month)
1

This does not address the main question, but one nice trick to get the last weekday in a month is to use calendar.monthcalendar, which returns a matrix of dates, organized with Monday as the first column through Sunday as the last.

# Some random date.
some_date = datetime.date(2012, 5, 23)

# Get last weekday
last_weekday = np.asarray(calendar.monthcalendar(some_date.year, some_date.month))[:,0:-2].ravel().max()

print last_weekday
31

The whole [0:-2] thing is to shave off the weekend columns and throw them out. Dates that fall outside of the month are indicated by 0, so the max effectively ignores them.

The use of numpy.ravel is not strictly necessary, but I hate relying on the mere convention that numpy.ndarray.max will flatten the array if not told which axis to calculate over.

1

How about more simply:

import datetime
now = datetime.datetime.now()
datetime.date(now.year, 1 if now.month==12 else now.month+1, 1) - datetime.timedelta(days=1)
1

To me the easier way is using pandas (two lines solution):

    from datetime import datetime
    import pandas as pd

    firstday_month = datetime(year, month, 1)
    lastday_month = firstday_month + pd.offsets.MonthEnd(1)

Another way to do it is: Taking the first day of the month, then adding one month and discounting one day:

    from datetime import datetime
    import pandas as pd

    firstday_month = datetime(year, month, 1)
    lastday_month = firstday_month + pd.DateOffset(months=1) - pd.DateOffset(days=1)
0
import calendar
from time import gmtime, strftime
calendar.monthrange(int(strftime("%Y", gmtime())), int(strftime("%m", gmtime())))[1]

Output:

31



This will print the last day of whatever the current month is. In this example it was 15th May, 2016. So your output may be different, however the output will be as many days that the current month is. Great if you want to check the last day of the month by running a daily cron job.

So:

import calendar
from time import gmtime, strftime
lastDay = calendar.monthrange(int(strftime("%Y", gmtime())), int(strftime("%m", gmtime())))[1]
today = strftime("%d", gmtime())
lastDay == today

Output:

False

Unless it IS the last day of the month.

0

I prefer this way

import datetime
import calendar

date=datetime.datetime.now()
month_end_date=datetime.datetime(date.year,date.month,1) + datetime.timedelta(days=calendar.monthrange(date.year,date.month)[1] - 1)
0

If you want to make your own small function, this is a good starting point:

def eomday(year, month):
    """returns the number of days in a given month"""
    days_per_month = [31, 28, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31]
    d = days_per_month[month - 1]
    if month == 2 and (year % 4 == 0 and year % 100 != 0 or year % 400 == 0):
        d = 29
    return d

For this you have to know the rules for the leap years:

  • every fourth year
  • with the exception of every 100 year
  • but again every 400 years
3
  • 1
    Sure, but the system libraries already have this data, and should the rules be changed by decree the updating of the libraries is somebody else's problem. – Jasen Sep 4 '17 at 4:54
  • Well, possible, but highly unlikely, and even if - it would only bite you in about 2000 years... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gregorian_calendar#Accuracy – mathause Sep 4 '17 at 8:35
  • These rules don't work for 500 years into the past I have no confidence that they will stand for thousands of years into the future, – Jasen Sep 8 '17 at 0:26
0

If you pass in a date range, you can use this:

def last_day_of_month(any_days):
    res = []
    for any_day in any_days:
        nday = any_day.days_in_month -any_day.day
        res.append(any_day + timedelta(days=nday))
    return res

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