1

Assume we have two controllers ControllerA and ControllerB in an MVC4 project placed like so:

  Controllers
  |
  \- MvcApi
  |   |
  |   \- ControllerB.cs
  |
  \- ControllerA.cs

The concept is that ControllerB is an mvc-controller which -however- serves html-razor-partial-views purely via ajax-calls. ControllerA on the other hand is a salt-of-the-earth mvc controller. In RouteConfig.cs we have:

public class MvcRouteConfig
{
    public static void RegisterRoutes(RouteCollection routes)
    {
        routes.IgnoreRoute("{resource}.axd/{*pathInfo}");

        routes.MapRoute(
            name: "MvcApi",
            url: "mvcapi/{controller}/{action}/{id}",
            defaults: new { id = UrlParameter.Optional },
            namespaces: new[] { typeof(BController).Namespace } //<- "Project.Views.MvcApi"
        );

        routes.MapRoute(
            name: "Default",
            url: "{controller}/{action}/{id}",
            defaults: new { controller = "AController", action = "Index", id = UrlParameter.Optional },
            namespaces: new[] { typeof(AController).Namespace } //<- "Project.Views"
        );
    }
}

We now try to auto-generate a url pointing to an action of the AController like so:

 @(Url.RouteUrl(routeValues: new { controller = "A", action = nameof(AController.SomeActionNameHere) }))

Given the configuration shown above we would expect the above statement to result in:

"/A/SomeActionNameHere"

However what we do get is:

"/mvcapi/A/SomeActionNameHere"

This ofcourse works in runtime however it's completely misleading ("just because it's working it doesn't mean it's right"). We can enforce the desired behaviour by specifying the route-name explicitly:

@(Url.RouteUrl(
     routeName: "Default",  // <- this "fixes" the issue
     routeValues: new { controller = "A", action = nameof(AController.SomeActionNameHere) })
) 

This does indeed return the desired url:

"/A/SomeActionNameHere"

However I am buffled by the fact that the asp.net infrastructure gets clogged so easily and ends up needing so much "hand-holding" in order for it to figure out that AController lives directly under the "Views" namespace and not under "Views.MvcApi". One would expect that issuying a simple:

 @(Url.RouteUrl(routeValues: new { controller = "A", action = nameof(AController.SomeActionNameHere) }))

Would auto-magically return the correct url straight away. What's going on?

Addendum: I've also inspected the 2 web.config files of the project and can't spot anything fishy. If you think that there might be something there bug me and I will update this post with the needed snippets for you to inspect them.

0

Every request to build a url goes through the collection of defined routes and uses the first one that meets the requirements. You have defined two routes. Both o them requires {controller}, {action} and {id} which is exactly what you provide (ID is optional). During this process it doesn't check whether the controller or action exists, it's your responsibility to make sure your mapping won't create url that doesn't exists. And since your MvcApi route is the first in the list, MVC uses this definition to build the URL for you.

In order to avoid this behavior, you can leave out the {controller} parameter completely and change it to this:

routes.MapRoute(
    name: "MvcApi",
    url: "mvcapi/BController/{action}/{id}",
    defaults: new { id = UrlParameter.Optional },
    namespaces: new[] { typeof(BController).Namespace } //<- "Project.Views.MvcApi"
);

routes.MapRoute(
    name: "Default",
    url: "AController/{action}/{id}",
    defaults: new { action = "Index", id = UrlParameter.Optional },
    namespaces: new[] { typeof(AController).Namespace } //<- "Project.Views"
);

Or for example use contsraints

routes.MapRoute(
    name: "Default",
    url: "AController/{action}/{id}",
    defaults: new { action = "Index", id = UrlParameter.Optional },
    constraints: new { controller = @"(BController|SomeOtherControllerName)" },
    namespaces: new[] { typeof(AController).Namespace } //<- "Project.Views"
);

That will help you to add more rules to the route.

You can also play with the order of the mapped routes if it helps.

Or you can keep using the name of the route. That's absolutely valid way how to tell MVC which URL you want to render.

  • Thanks for tuning in. I was aware of this approach but I can't come to terms with the fact that I have to manually add a new route everytime I add a new controller under the MvcApi folder. Can this really be the best that 21st-century technology can do? :) – XDS Mar 22 '17 at 13:06
  • Not really. You don't have to create a new route for each controller. But the way you build your routes depends on many things. Each project is unique and that's why you have several ways how to map the routes and how to distinguish them - names, parameters, constraints and even order of the mapped routes. – Tacud Mar 22 '17 at 13:11
  • Would you be kind enough to update your response with an example of how to auto-target a controller named CController which lives right next to BController in the same folder+namespace with it? How can this be achieved without introducing one more separate (explicit) route to it? This is the part that is missing from the puzzle. – XDS Mar 22 '17 at 13:19
  • 1
    That's what the "Default" route will do. It'll handle all controllers but you just need to make sure that the wrong route is not chosen when you need something more specific. Like the "MvcApi" route in your case. So as I suggested: Use "constraints": regular expressions to specify valid controller names for each route. Or - if there is only one controller for the MvcApi route - use explicit route while mapping. But keep the "Default" route as it is. Or - IMHO better practice - use Url.RouteUrl instead of Url.Action. Like @Url.RouteUrl("MvcApi", new { controller = "Home", action = "Index" }); – Tacud Mar 22 '17 at 14:13
  • I guess I can make a generic route if I use constraints and a bit of reflection magic so as to create the constrain-regex dynamically "upon-server-boot". I will let the question linger for a while in hopes of having more input/feedback on this issue. – XDS Mar 22 '17 at 18:33

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