-4

I need to accumulate values into a collection, based on an arbitrary function. Each value is derived from calling a function on the previous value.

My current attempt:

public static T[] Aggregate<T>(this T source, Func<T, T> func)
{
  var arr = new List<T> { };
  var current = source;
  while(current != null)
  {
    arr.Add(current);
    current = func(current);
  };
  return arr.ToArray();
}

Is there a built-in .Net Framework function to do this?

17
  • So what did you attempt to do in your attempts to create such a function? What problems did you have with your attempted solution?
    – Servy
    Mar 22 '17 at 19:33
  • @Servy He wants to know whether such a function already exists, not how to implement it.
    – TZubiri
    Mar 22 '17 at 19:35
  • 1
    Perhaps your "contrived example" would be a bit less contrived and a bit more explanatory if you gave the input as well as the output... Because there is already an Aggregate<T> function in LINQ, but can't be sure if it meets your requirements because I don't know the input. Mar 22 '17 at 19:57
  • 1
    @toddmo Why would you spend considerable amounts of time trying to find someone else's implementation of something that you've already implemented and that already works? Anyway, as I said, asking for a link to some external reference isn't on topic, so the fact that you already have a working implementation doesn't make the question any more on topic.
    – Servy
    Mar 22 '17 at 19:57
  • 1
    @Servy, If that "Someone" is Microsoft, then it's simply best practice to use the correct .Net Framework function if it exists. That goes without saying. And in some arcane cases like advanced set manipulation, searching is hard because the search terms are not known or intuitive.
    – toddmo
    Mar 22 '17 at 20:00
1

This operation is usually called Unfold. There's no built-in version but it is implemented in FSharp.Core, so you could wrap that:

public static IEnumerable<T> Unfold<T, TState>(TState init, Func<TState, T> gen)
{
    var liftF = new Converter<TState, Microsoft.FSharp.Core.FSharpOption<Tuple<T, TState>>>(x =>
    {
        var r = gen(x);
        if (r == null)
        {
            return Microsoft.FSharp.Core.FSharpOption<Tuple<T, TState>>.None;
        }
        else
        {
            return Microsoft.FSharp.Core.FSharpOption<Tuple<T, TState>>.Some(Tuple.Create(r, x));
        }
    });

    var ff = Microsoft.FSharp.Core.FSharpFunc<TState, Microsoft.FSharp.Core.FSharpOption<Tuple<T, TState>>>.FromConverter(liftF);
    return Microsoft.FSharp.Collections.SeqModule.Unfold<TState, T>(ff, init);
}

public static IEnumerable<T> Unfold<T>(T source, Func<T, T> func)
{
    return Unfold<T>(source, func);
}

however writing your own version would be simpler:

public static IEnumerable<T> Unfold<T>(T source, Func<T, T> func)
{
    T current = source;
    while(current != null)
    {
        yield return current;
        current = func(current);
    }
}
1
  • Why does my question seem like a quality question to you, but not to so many others? I'm mystified. Anyways, thanks! This is exactly the definitive answer that I was looking for.
    – toddmo
    Mar 22 '17 at 20:39
-1

You are referring to an anamorphism as mentioned here linq-unfold-operator, which is the dual of a catamorphism.

Unfold is the dual of Aggregate. Aggregate exists in the .Net Framework; Unfold does not (for some unknown reason). Hence your confusion.

/// seeds: the initial data to unfold
/// stop: if stop(seed) is True, don't go any further
/// map: transform the seed into the final data
/// next: generate the next seed value from the current seed 
public static IEnumerable<R> UnFold<T,R>(this IEnumerable<T> seeds, Predicate<T> stop, 
                                         Func<T,R> map, Func<T,IEnumerable<T>> next) {
    foreach (var seed in seeds) {
        if (!stop(seed)) {
            yield return map(seed);
            foreach (var val in next(seed).UnFold(stop, map, next))
                yield return val; 
        }
    }
}

Usage Example:

var parents = new[]{someType}.UnFold(t => t == null, t => t, 
                                     t => t.GetInterfaces().Concat(new[]{t.BaseType}))
                             .Distinct();
3
  • What has this got to do with your question? Your Aggregate function returns a collection. Aggregate is a fold, you appear to want an Unfold.
    – Lee
    Mar 22 '17 at 20:21
  • @Lee, it's just a placeholder so I can edit the answer if they close it and I do indeed find the correct .Net function. Unfold (in F#) needs a sequence to work on. In my case, I just have a single initial value and a function with which to get the next value. Understand?
    – toddmo
    Mar 22 '17 at 20:26
  • Yes, so you could wrap the F# version if you want, but writing your own version would probably be easier.
    – Lee
    Mar 22 '17 at 20:29

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