345

I can mark a javascript function as "async" (i.e. returning a promise) with the async keyword. Like this:

async function foo() {
  // do something
}

What is the equivalent syntax for arrow functions?

  • 2
    It's worth noting that at least firefox and babel does let you do that – Jaromanda X Mar 22 '17 at 22:55
  • 10
    var foo = async () => await Promise.resolve('ha'); - works just fine – Jaromanda X Mar 22 '17 at 22:56
  • 2
    saying it doesn't work is meaningless ... are you getting an error? perhaps you're doing something else wrong, without the code that "doesn't work" and a meaningful description of how it doesn't work, can only guess that you're doing something wrong (or using an old browser) – Jaromanda X Mar 22 '17 at 22:57
  • 1
    that may well be @Pointy, but it does work natively in current firefox and chrome and node.js (7.7.4) – Jaromanda X Mar 22 '17 at 22:59
  • 1
    The ES2017 spec has a section on async arrow function definitions @Pointy. – Heretic Monkey Mar 22 '17 at 23:05
582

Async arrow functions look like this:

const foo = async () => {
  // do something
}

Async arrow functions look like this for a single argument passed to it:

const foo = async evt => {
  // do something with evt
}

The anonymous form works as well:

const foo = async function() {
  // do something
}

An async function declaration looks like this:

async function foo() {
  // do something
}

Using async function in a callback:

const foo = event.onCall(async () => {
  // do something
})
  • 10
    The OP appears to be looking for a named, async, arrow function which is the one syntax you do not show. – jfriend00 Mar 22 '17 at 23:19
  • 43
    Actually, const foo = async () => {} creates a named async function named foo. It's entirely possible to do named functions this way (just no hoisting). In ES2016+ assignment of an anonymous function to a variable names it after the variable if it is declared there. – Benjamin Gruenbaum Mar 22 '17 at 23:55
  • 5
    @BenjaminGruenbaum Please don't call it named function. In js, a named anonymous function is a very specific syntax foo = function bar () {} that was created to replace arguments.callee when writing recursive anonymous functions. What you have there is a variable named foo that is a reference to a function. – slebetman Jun 4 '17 at 2:32
  • 17
    @slebetman since ES2015 when you do const foo = async () => {} the name of the function is set to foo - ecma-international.org/ecma-262/6.0/… and ecma-international.org/ecma-262/6.0/… - see discussion in esdiscuss.org/topic/… – Benjamin Gruenbaum Jun 4 '17 at 19:03
  • 1
    @FarisRayhan It's just as with other constants, the reference of the variable somefunction cannot be changed after it is set. (It points to your anonymous async function.) – Qwerty Jul 24 '18 at 12:16
103

This the simplest way to assign an async arrow function expression to a named variable:

const foo = async () => {
  // do something
}

Ta-da!

(Note that this is not strictly equivalent to async function foo() { }. Besides the differences between the function keyword and an arrow expression, the function in this answer is not "hoisted to the top".)

  • 9
    Note that a named function expression is a very specific syntax in javascript. This is NOT a named function expression. Using the right words is important to avoid confusion later on when one phrase can evolve to mean two things. FYI, a named function expression is: foo = function myName () {}. The name is myName and it is specified to only exist inside the anonymous function and not defined anywhere outside. It's purpose is to replace arguments.callee when writing recursive anonymous functions. – slebetman Jun 4 '17 at 2:30
  • 1
    I was about to dispute you @slebetman on technicality, since this is a (arrow) function expression and you end up with a named function (ie foo.name === 'foo'). But only because it's in the initializer of a const *statement*—meaning it's not quite right to call this a "named async arrow function expression". You're also correct that a named function expression's name is only bound inside its own body, but it is also stored in the function's name property, which is nice for debugging (and is more often the reason I'd name them). – Vaz Sep 2 '17 at 23:32
  • 3
    To put it another way, there's no such thing as a "named arrow function expression", but it can become "named" by being part of a const or let statement (not sure about var because of hoisting), in the sense of having a name fn.name as well as having a binding in scope (the variable). – Vaz Sep 2 '17 at 23:35
  • 1
    This is the best answer I think – Johan Hoeksma Jan 19 '18 at 11:51
  • 1
    Thanks this is helpful. By using constant it is more standard way. – Faris Rayhan Feb 2 '18 at 11:07
20

Immediately Invoked Async Arrow Function:

(async () => {
    console.log(await asyncFunction());
})();

Immediately Invoked Async Function Expression:

(async function () {
    console.log(await asyncFunction());
})();
12

You may also do:

 YourAsyncFunctionName = async (value) => {

    /* Code goes here */

}
  • 4
    with one param you don't need parenthesis. YourAsyncFunctionName = async value => { /* Code goes here */ } – Takács Zsolt Mar 18 '18 at 19:48
4

Async Arrow function syntax with paramaters

const MyFunction = async (a,b,c) => {
  //code here
}
-2

/*foo = async (props) => {

/* Code goes here */

} Please remove these comments*/

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