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I probably don't understand python's lambda very much. So it confuses me evry time. For example if I have this simple lambda construction with constant, everything works perfect:

>>> f = lambda max,x=0:[ x for x in iter(lambda: x+0.5,max+1.) if x<max ]
>>> f(10)
[0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, 6.0, 6.5, 7.0, 7.5, 8.0, 8.5, 9.0, 9.5]

But if I substitute random number generator instead of constant 0.5, it would stuck and never returns back....

>>> f = lambda max,x=0:[ x for x in iter(lambda: x+random.random(),max+1.) if x<max ]
>>> f(10)

Why?! And what to do to avoid it?

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    Because iter(callable, sentinal) will only stop if sentinal is returned exactly. Probably, in this case you miss and it keeps going on forever. This is dangerous to do with floating point numbers in general, let alone random ones. This has nothing to do with lambda, and indeed, you shouldn't be using a lambda function here at all. Mar 22 '17 at 23:01
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iter(lambda: x+0.5,max+1.) stops when the lambda function returns exactly max+1.. The function does return max+1., so the iterator stops there, but that could have gone differently by a fluke of floating-point rounding.

iter(lambda: x+random.random(),max+1.) only stops if the lambda function returns exactly max+1., but this time, it is extremely unlikely that the function will ever return that value. Your list comprehension filters iterator elements forever.


Note that both of your code snippets rely on Python 2 list comprehension variable scope behavior, where the x in the comprehension's for clause is the same as the x from the function the comprehension appears in. That changed in Python 3, so neither of your code snippets work on Python 3.

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  • Yeah, it's relying on the x from the for clause is being bound to the free-variable in the lambda in iter. Had to scratch my head for a bit. Mar 22 '17 at 23:10
  • Thank you, Sorry if it is too unpythonian code. I'm just trying to work around the problem and nothing works. :(
    – rth
    Mar 22 '17 at 23:14
  • @rth use lambda start, step, stop: itertools.takewhile(functools.partial(operator.gt, stop), itertools.count(start, step)) Mar 22 '17 at 23:19
  • @juanpa.arrivillaga That doesn't have randomness. Mar 22 '17 at 23:20
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    @juanpa.arrivillaga I challenge you to actually do it :-). I had already tried that and came across a problem I couldn't easily fix. Mar 22 '17 at 23:25
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Here are some ways to achieve what you want. First, some code-golf:

def f(stop): 
    return itertools.takewhile(functools.partial(operator.gt, stop), itertools.accumulate(iter(random.random, object())))

I'll leave you to deciphering that as an exercise (a great way to explore itertools!). And also as a good lesson on why you shouldn't write cryptic one-liners...

However, I would probably just do:

In [5]: def increase_random(stop, start=0):
    ...:     start += random.random()
    ...:     while start < stop:
    ...:         yield start
    ...:         start += random.random()
    ...:

See how much more readable and straight-forward that is? 6 months from now, I'll re-read that and know exactly what I was trying to do.

Here it is in action:

In [7]: list(increase_random(5))
Out[7]:
[0.442800767759875,
 1.4148173965715438,
 1.7683959590284435,
 2.116245564487893,
 2.832867264471769,
 3.684055219689638,
 3.986469894067608,
 4.617838198100095]

In [8]: list(increase_random(5))
Out[8]:
[0.5851100455307873,
 1.3248041125729781,
 2.275952338784795,
 2.539203591128045,
 2.7563520512088835,
 3.259124317278677,
 4.1641913798928805,
 4.77771351014472]

In [9]: list(increase_random(10))
Out[9]:
[0.4226041227598847,
 1.0816534967326379,
 1.1540685081566209,
 1.6987578052795809,
 2.118172344169681,
 2.5349681976516156,
 3.137101744986478,
 3.1436528694585766,
 3.455139268185562,
 3.7614777591407975,
 4.072603396579612,
 4.71137983138932,
 5.01309327918888,
 5.098769083492201,
 5.858553103139947,
 5.950601116127209,
 5.956983974085873,
 5.967975512928789,
 6.090114835094137,
 6.105296749316677,
 6.329459825745162,
 6.825175725633318,
 7.738665256248604,
 8.409407710225171,
 9.202163699315623,
 9.497148670699866,
 9.839990622387328,
 9.977297575005993]

OK, here is a reward for reading this far... the one-liner works thusly:

itertools.takewhile takes a function and an iterable. The takewhile will yield from the iterable as long as the function returns True. The function I use is functools.partial(operator.gt, stop), which is the partial-application of the operator.gt, op.gt(a, b) is equivalent to a > b, so we take while stop is greater than the value returned by the iteterable. Finally, the iterable is itertools.accumulate(iter(random.random, object()). accumulate (only on Python 3) takes an iterable and keeps adding the iterables values to it... i.e. accumulating. So, e.g:

In [10]: list(itertools.accumulate([1, 2, 3, 4]))
Out[10]: [1, 3, 6, 10]

The iterable I pass to accumulate is iter(random.random, object()) which just calls random.random until the value is == object(), which is never.

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    No need to wrap random.random in a lambda. Mar 22 '17 at 23:48
  • And instead of the partial you could use float(stop).__gt__, though the fact that I had to convert to float somewhat shows that partial might be the better choice... Mar 23 '17 at 0:22
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    @stefanpochmann Yeah good point about random.random. I think the lands wrapper was leftover from a my earlier attempts. I don't like using dunder methods directly, so I use operator Mar 23 '17 at 0:29
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    @rth because iter(random.random, object()) is an infinite iterator. Just because the condition in the or statement of the comprehension is failing past a certain point doesn't mean the list comprehension will stop iterating over it. And stop wrapping things in lambdas like that. if you are going to assign the function to a name, e.g. f = lambda... then you should just use a full function definition. In fact, that is part of the official style guide, PEP8. Mar 23 '17 at 5:31
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    @rth Yeah, it's only available on Python 3, but it's easy to implement. Indeed, the Python 3 docs have an equivalent Python implementation. Mar 23 '17 at 16:49

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