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Dim X as New Y vs. Dim X as Y = New Y() New Question: Followup question to this thread: Dim X as New Y vs. Dim X as Y = New Y()

I'm running VS2015 (VB 14) Can someone help me out here ? Given this class:

Public Class Form1
    Dim test3 As New Example
    Dim test4 = New Example
    Private Sub Form1_Load(sender As Object, e As EventArgs) Handles MyBase.Load
        Dim test1 As New Example
        Dim test2 = New Example
        test1.Mylist.Add("1")
        test2.Mylist.Add("2")
    End Sub
End Class
Class Example
    Public Sub New()
        Mylist = New List(Of String)
    End Sub
    Public Mylist As List(Of String)
End Class

Test4 is of type object NOT example as expected.

Thanks, -TD

6
  • 1
    er...what type is it and how are you identifying it? Mar 23 '17 at 1:40
  • ?? I posted everything. Was I not clear enough?
    – TD_Home
    Mar 23 '17 at 1:45
  • Oh do you mean in the second example the type is literally 'object'. How are you identifying this - by hovering over the variable in the debugger? Mar 23 '17 at 1:48
  • I just updated with the entire contents of form1, if you break anywhere in form1_load , test4 is object.
    – TD_Home
    Mar 23 '17 at 1:58
  • Test4 is object since you don't add the type. Dim without a type will be object.
    – Esselans
    Mar 23 '17 at 2:10
2

Your confusion is understandable and is a consequence of the syntactic sugar that the language supports. You are taking advantage of Local Type Inference (Visual Basic) in the first example. This bit of sugar is only applicable at the procedure level and is the reason both test1 and test2 are of type Example.

In your second example of:

Dim test1 As New Example
Dim test2 = New Example
Private Sub Form1_Load(sender As Object, e As EventArgs) Handles MyBase.Load
  test1.Mylist.Add("1")
  test2.Mylist.Add("2")           
End Sub

The variable test2 is declared at the class level and as such is not eligible for type inference. Hence as declared, it will be of type Object. The code would be converted to something similar to the following.

Dim test1 As Example
Dim test2 As Object
Public Sub New()
   test1 = New Example()
   test2 = New Example()
   InitializeComponent()
End Sub

Private Sub Form1_Load(sender As Object, e As EventArgs) Handles MyBase.Load
  test1.Mylist.Add("1")
  test2.Mylist.Add("2")           
End Sub

Edit: The original post has been edited while I was typing out this answer, but the reasoning remains the same. As such I will not modify this to reflect the changes to the original post code example.

3
  • Your on the right track and I thank you, You might have read this before I edited my first response. If you look at the entire form1 I posted, why does test2 come over as example but test4 does not?
    – TD_Home
    Mar 23 '17 at 2:24
  • @user7685699, your changes to the code in OP do not change the underlying cause of your confusion. The type inference feature is only available at the procedure level. Please re-read my answer and look at the provided link.
    – TnTinMn
    Mar 23 '17 at 2:25
  • "The variable test2 is declared at the class level and as such is not eligible for type inference." Yet it is returning the class reference type as example? Sorry I know I'm confused but just making sure ..., What I'm getting at is regardless, 2 different Dims and 2 different levels returning different results???
    – TD_Home
    Mar 23 '17 at 2:30

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