7

I have an Excel File that I want to format. The first row (excluding Headers so row2) should be red and italicized.

the Openpyxl Documentation states:

If you want to apply styles to entire rows and columns then you must apply the style to each cell yourself

I personally thinks this stinks... Here is my workaround:

import openpyxl
from openpyxl.styles import NamedStyle
from openpyxl import load_workbook
from openpyxl.styles.colors import RED
from openpyxl.styles import Font
# I normally import a lot of stuff... I'll also take suggestions here.

file = 'MY_PATH'
wb = load_workbook(filename=file)
sheet = wb.get_sheet_by_name('Output')

for row in sheet.iter_rows():
    for cell in row:
        if '2' in cell.coordinate:
            # using str() on cell.coordinate to use it in sheet['Cell_here']
            sheet[str(cell.coordinate)].font = Font(color='00FF0000', italic=True)

 wb.save(filename=file)

The first downside is that if there are more cells such as A24 my loop will apply the formatting to it. I can fix this with a regular expression. Would that be the correct approach?

Ultimately- is there a better way to apply a format to the entire row? Also. Can anyone point me in the right direction to some good Openpyxl documentation? I only found out about sheet.iter_rows() and cell.coordinates on Stack.

25

There is no need to iterate on all of the rows if you only intend to change the colour for the second row, you can just iterate over a single row as follows:

import openpyxl
from openpyxl import load_workbook
from openpyxl.styles import Font

file = 'input.xlsx'
wb = load_workbook(filename=file)
ws = wb['Output']
red_font = Font(color='00FF0000', italic=True)

# Enumerate the cells in the second row
for cell in ws["2:2"]:
    cell.font = red_font

wb.save(filename=file)

Giving you something like:

excel screen shot

Accessing multiple cells is described in the openpyxl docs: Accessing many cells


Alternatively, to use a NamedStyle:

import openpyxl
from openpyxl import load_workbook
from openpyxl.styles import Font, NamedStyle

file = 'input.xlsx'
wb = load_workbook(filename=file)
ws = wb.get_sheet_by_name('Output')

# Create a NamedStyle (if not already defined)
if 'red_italic' not in wb.named_styles:
    red_italic = NamedStyle(name="red_italic")
    red_italic.font = Font(color='00FF0000', italic=True)
    wb.add_named_style(red_italic)

# Enumerate the cells in the second row
for cell in ws["2:2"]:
    cell.style = 'red_italic'

wb.save(filename=file)
  • Thank you! This is the type of thing that I wish was documented. I didn't know you could index like that. In fact, the documentation snippet I quoted is very misleading in light of this approach. – MattR Mar 23 '17 at 15:53
  • 2
    It is in the docs, but a bit buried maybe Accessing many cells. – Martin Evans Mar 23 '17 at 15:55
  • 2
    If you have a lot of cells to format then NamedStyles is the way to go. – Charlie Clark Mar 23 '17 at 16:53
  • 1
    @CharlieClark I've used NamedStyle before, but how would you apply that to my case? – MattR Mar 23 '17 at 19:31
  • 1
    link broken: Accessing many cells – xtian Oct 27 '18 at 20:00

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.