11

I've installed a self-signed root ca cert into debian's /usr/share/ca-certificates/local and installed them with sudo dpkg-reconfigure ca-certificates. At this point true | gnutls-cli mysite.local is happy, and true | openssl s_client -connect mysite.local:443 is happy, but python2 and python3 requests module insists it is not happy with the cert.

python2:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<string>", line 1, in <module>
  File "/usr/local/lib/python2.7/site-packages/requests/api.py", line 70, in get
    return request('get', url, params=params, **kwargs)
  File "/usr/local/lib/python2.7/site-packages/requests/api.py", line 56, in request
    return session.request(method=method, url=url, **kwargs)
  File "/usr/local/lib/python2.7/site-packages/requests/sessions.py", line 488, in request
    resp = self.send(prep, **send_kwargs)
  File "/usr/local/lib/python2.7/site-packages/requests/sessions.py", line 609, in send
    r = adapter.send(request, **kwargs)
  File "/usr/local/lib/python2.7/site-packages/requests/adapters.py", line 497, in send
    raise SSLError(e, request=request)
requests.exceptions.SSLError: ("bad handshake: Error([('SSL routines', 'ssl3_get_server_certificate', 'certificate verify failed')],)",)

python3

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<string>", line 1, in <module>
  File "/usr/local/bin/python3.5/site-packages/requests/api.py", line 70, in get
    return request('get', url, params=params, **kwargs)
  File "/usr/local/bin/python3.5/site-packages/requests/api.py", line 56, in request
    return session.request(method=method, url=url, **kwargs)
  File "/usr/local/bin/python3.5/site-packages/requests/sessions.py", line 488, in request
    resp = self.send(prep, **send_kwargs)
  File "/usr/local/bin/python3.5/site-packages/requests/sessions.py", line 609, in send
    r = adapter.send(request, **kwargs)
  File "/usr/local/bin/python3.5/site-packages/requests/adapters.py", line 497, in send
    raise SSLError(e, request=request)
requests.exceptions.SSLError: ("bad handshake: Error([('SSL routines', 'ssl3_get_server_certificate', 'certificate verify failed')],)",)

Why does python ignore the system ca-certificates bundle, and how do I integrate it?

31

From https://stackoverflow.com/a/33717517/1695680

To make python requests use the system ca-certificates bundle, it needs to be told to use it over its own embedded bundle

export REQUESTS_CA_BUNDLE=/etc/ssl/certs/ca-certificates.crt

Requests embeds its bundles here, for reference:

/usr/local/lib/python2.7/site-packages/requests/cacert.pem
/usr/lib/python3/dist-packages/requests/cacert.pem
  • 3
    After I delete the default cacert.pem bundled by requests, requests seems to pickup the system ca-certifications bundle without setting the environment variable. – Rajasi Kulkarni Aug 8 '17 at 13:54
1

I struggled with this for a week or so recently. I finally found that the way to verify a self-signed, or privately signed, certificate in Python. You need to create your own certificate bundle file. No need to update obscure certificate bundles every time you update a library, or add anything to the system certificate store.

Start by running the openssl command that you ran before, but add -showcerts. openssl s_client -connect mysite.local:443 -showcerts This will give you a long output, and at the top you'll see the entire certificate chain. Usually, this means three certs, the website's certificate, the intermediate certificate, and the root certificate in that order. We need to put just the root and intermediate certificates into a next file in the opposite order.

Copy the last cert, the root certificate, to a new text file. Grab just the stuff between, and including:

-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
...
-----END CERTIFICATE-----

Copy the middle cert (aka the intermediate certificate) to the new text file under the root cert. Again, grab the Begin and End Certificate lines and everything in between.

Save this text file to the directory where your Python script resides. My recommendation is to call it CertBundle.pem. (If you give it a different name, or put it somewhere else in your folder structure, make sure that the verify line reflects that.) Update your script to reference the new certificate bundle:

response = requests.post("https://www.example.com/", headers=headerContents, json=bodyContents, verify="CertBundle.pem")

And that's it. If you have only the root or only the intermediate certificate, then Python can't validate the entire certificate chain. But, if you include both of the certificates in the certificate bundle that you created, then Python can validate that the intermediate was signed by the root, and then when it accesses the website it can validate that the website's certificate was signed by the intermediate certificate.

edit: Fixed the file extension for the cert bundle. Also, fixed a couple of grammatical mistakes.

  • 1
    I'm not confident .p7b is the right semantic extension for said bundle. (Albeit I am not really an expert) just used to seeing .pem and .crt used for CA Bundles. I know the debian ca-certificates package is picky about certificates being .crt extensions to be added to the system-provided certificate store. – ThorSummoner Feb 6 '18 at 19:24
  • I almost said something about that in my post. I went with p7b because I think that's the right extention, but for this purpose it doesn't matter. It can be .txt, or no extention at all. The important thing is that your Python script can find the file. – fryad Feb 9 '18 at 3:08
  • 2
    @fryad is correct; this file ought to have the .pem extension, and some tools will mishandle it because it has the wrong extension. .pem is the de facto standard extension for this base64-encoded certificate format, while the binary version of the same format is .der, and .p7b is a different base64-encoded format. A handy reference on how to convert among them using openssl CLI tools: knowledge.digicert.com/solution/SO26449.html – Dan Lenski Jul 17 '18 at 2:58

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.