3

In ES6 syntax, it's easy to follow that a component that extends Component from React is a React component. For example:

import { Component } from 'react';
class ExampleComponent extends Component {
     render(){
          return(
              //render component content here
          )
     }
}

but if you rewrite this using the Stateless Component approach:

const ExampleComponent = (props) => {
    return
        //render component content here
}

... what happens behind the scenes so that this component inherits the lifecycle behavior from Component?

3

A stateless component as a function, acts as the body of the render method found in the lifecycle methods. When you define a component as a function, it is wrapped in a class's render method.

Component Class's render() === Stateless Component Function

3
  • So if a component declared as a stateless component function in this way is passed to the render of a container component to be rendered, React assumes the body of this stateless function returns only content for the render of the parent component? In otherwords there isn't anything React specific about the stateless component function itself, only that by convention what it returns is expected to be render-able by whoever calls it? Mar 23 '17 at 17:23
  • 1
    Yeah, the only thing I would add is that it should return JSX, or a React.createElement(), or null :) Mar 23 '17 at 17:25
  • When you define a component as a function, it is wrapped in a class's render method. - is this actually how it works? It sounds as though this would introduce a lot of unnecessary overhead.
    – Tom Fenech
    Mar 23 '17 at 17:28
3

What happens behind the scenes so that this component inherits the lifecycle behavior from Component?

A stateless component has no backing instance and as such, no lifecycle methods.

It's just a function, that returns a React element (strings and null are valid React elements).

React handles Components and Stateless Components differently. If it's a function that returns something render-able, then it gets rendered directly. If it's a class with a render method, then the class is instantiated (if that hasn't already been done yet) and the render method is used.

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