2

Is it possible to make declaration of variadic function so that it doesn't end with "..."?

Today I learned more about exec from unistd.h but through the day I've seen three (two actually) different declaration of execl:

1) int execl ( const char * path, const char * arg0, ..., (char*)NULL ); was shown to us in school and I imagined I would have to end the function call with a NULL value

2) int execl(const char *path, const char *arg, ... /* (char *) NULL */); is what I've found in the exec(3) man page. That would probably mean I still have to end it with a NULL value, but it is not enforced.

3) int execl(const char *path, const char *arg, ...); is what I found here. This one would probably normally put me to rest with the first one being a simplification for students, the second was a varning and this is the real thing (even though I would probably have normally higher regard for both options one and two.)

But then I found on the same site this declaration:

int execle(const char *path, const char *arg, ..., char * const envp[]);

Same question applies, I was unable to create variadic function not ending in ... with gcc telling me that it's expecting ')' before ',' token pointing to the comma after the three dots.

So finally, is it possible to make variadic functions ending with a NULL characters (execl) and if not, is it possible to make it end with predefined variable (execle)?

I tried to compile with gcc 6.3.1, I also tried --std=c11.

1
  • Not celar what you ask. ... must be the last in the argument list. 1) is definitively wrong, 2) is valid - as a minor task: research why. And NULL is a macro, not a character. Mar 23 '17 at 18:46
4

Is it possible to make declaration of variadic function so that it doesn't end with "..."?

Is it possible is a slippery question, but consider these facts:

  • the standard says that "If a function that accepts a variable number of arguments is defined without a parameter type list that ends with the ellipsis notation, the behavior is undefined" (C2011, 6.9.1/8)

Perhaps that answers the question already, but if you choose to mince words and focus on function declarations that are not definitions, then

  • a function definition is also a declaration
  • the C language standard requires all declarations of the same function to be "compatible" (else program behavior is undefined) (C2011 6.7/4)
  • two function declarations with mismatched parameter lists are not compatible (C2011, 6.2.7/3)

Thus, if you declare a variadic function that in fact is also defined, and that function's parameter list does not end with ..., then the program's behavior is undefined.


The documentation you've been reading for execle() and execl() is written to express and discuss those functions' expectations, but to the extent that it seems to present variadic function declarations in which the last element of the parameter list is not ..., those are not actually valid C function declarations.

So finally, is it possible to make variadic functions ending with a NULL characters (execl) and if not, is it possible to make it end with predefined variable (execle)?

It is not possible to describe such calling conventions via conforming C declarations. Variadic functions can have such expectations, and can enforce them at runtime, but they can be enforced at compile time only by a compiler that relies on special knowledge of the functions involved, or on C language extensions that allow such constraints to be described.

1

The declaration of a variadic function can only specify the required arguments, and the compiler can enforce their types. The variable-length part never has any type checking done. And the variable-length part is always at the end. The declaration for execle() is not meant as an actual C declaration, but just to describe to the programmer how he should construct the arguments.

It's not possible to enforce that the last argument to execl() is NULL. Variadic functions don't know how many arguments were supplied, they determine it from the values of the arguments. printf() assumes that it has enough arguments to fill in all the operators in the format string, and execl() iterates through the arguments until it finds NULL (execle() is similar, but it reads one additional argument to get envp). If you don't end with NULL, it will just keep going, reading garbage and causing undefined behavior.

1

The declaration you see is the one in the man pages of execl. The declaration for execle in glib is the following: int execle (const char *path, const char *arg, ...). The implementation assumes the last argument is a char**, and uses it for envp. I don't think you can enforce such a rule in C.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.