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Was working through the following problem:

function padIt accept 2 parameters:

1.str, it's a string representing the string to pad, we need to pad some "*" at leftside or rightside of str

2.n, it's a number, how many times to pad the string.

This is the answer:

function padIt(str,n){
  var count = 0;
  while ( count < n ) {
    count % 2 ? str += '*' : str = '*' + str;
    count ++
  }
  return str;
}

Can someone explain this part? count % 2 ? str += '*' : str = '*' + str;

Say I put these parameters in the function, padIt('a', 1) The first loop will have count = 0 so the function will have 0 % 2 which = 0. Why does the function choose the option str = '*' + str to output '*a'? Why not str += '*' to output 'a*'?

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    0 % 2 is 0, as you've said, which is a falsey value. So 0 ? a : b chooses b for the same reason false ? a : b does. (Conversely, any non-zero number is truthy.)
    – nnnnnn
    Mar 24 '17 at 2:23
  • 1
    Use a larger value than one (such as 10) and look at the results (or step through the code with a debugger while it executes), and you'll understand what that line of code is doing. How in the world did coders survive back before SO, when you actually had to try something or step through code to figure it out yourself instead of looking for someone else to explain it?
    – Ken White
    Mar 24 '17 at 2:29
  • Bleh now I understand...thanks for clarifying!
    – jalexyep
    Mar 24 '17 at 2:32
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This is a one-line shorthand for an if-else statement. It's called the conditional(ternary) operator.

 function padIt(str,n){
  var count = 0;
  while ( count < n ) {
    count % 2 ? str += '*' : str = '*' + str;
    count ++
   }
    return str;
  }

This is construct count % 2 ? str += '*' : str = '*' + str; is the same as

      if(count % 2){
          str += '*';
       }else{

         str = '*' + str;
       }


count % 2 ? str += '*' : str = '*' + str; means if count is even do this if not do that.
The obvious advantage is that is it's shorter.

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