1

I am a newbie of javascript.

Start to learn Vue.js by reading the examples.

But I am confused about the code snippet of vuejs-templates/webpack-simple.

From line 25

  data () {
    return {
      msg: 'Welcome to Your Vue.js App'
    }
  }

I am wondering why code can't be written like this

  data: () => {
    return {
      msg: 'Welcome to Your Vue.js App'
    }
  }

I have tried both code, the same result.

I can't understand from reading Vue.js document.

Please help me to understand this code snippet.

Thank you for taking time reading my problem.

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  • 1
    Both are the same thing, the first one actually is a shorthand of the second. Mar 24 '17 at 7:13
  • @abhishekkannojia Thank you. Mar 24 '17 at 7:30
1

The question is not about why it isn't, but more about why should it.

In both cases, you are defining a function, which is member of an object literal. In es6 there is the feature of method properties, which is used as a shorthand notation. See also MDN.

1
  • Sorry I am not familiar to es6 syntax. Now I understand it, thank you. Mar 24 '17 at 7:29
1

I'd suggest you to take care when you want to use arrow functions over the method properties.

Arrow functions provides the lexical this so sometimes you could find yourself in situation where this doesn't refer to correct context (It should be Vue object itself but it pointent to parent object, in your case probably window).

VueJS Docs gives pretty same warning:

Don’t use arrow functions on an instance property or callback (e.g. vm.$watch('a', newVal => this.myMethod())). As arrow functions are bound to the parent context, this will not be the Vue instance as you’d expect and this.myMethod will be undefined.

https://vuejs.org/v2/guide/instance.html#Properties-and-Methods

1
  • 1
    Thanks for your reminder. I also saw that on document. Mar 24 '17 at 10:26

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