16

We are porting our existing MVC6 EF6 application to Core.

Is there a simple method in EF Core to update a many-to-many relationship?

My old code from EF6 where we clear the list and overwrite it with the new data no longer works.

var model = await _db.Products.FindAsync(vm.Product.ProductId);
model.Colors.Clear();
model.Colors =  _db.Colors.Where(x => 
vm.ColorsSelected.Contains(x.ColorId)).ToList();
  • What do you mean by no longer works? – Mohammed Noureldin May 25 '18 at 3:21
  • 1
    It no longer produces the expected result. Entity framework core does change tracking differently. – Talnaci Sergiu Vlad May 29 '18 at 9:08
  • I had a similar issue, tried the various answers below and in the end fixed it by making sure I was calling Include() and ThenInclude() on the child collection (Colors in your example). Much simpler. This article is also useful: thereformedprogrammer.net/… – Tom Robinson Apr 23 at 15:54
32

This will work for you.

Make a class to have the relationship in:

public class ColorProduct
{
    public int ProductId { get; set; }
    public int ColorId { get; set; }

    public Color Color { get; set; }
    public Product Product { get; set; }
}

Add a ColorProduct collection to your Product and Color classes:

 public ICollection<ColorProduct> ColorProducts { get; set; }

Then use this extension I made to remove the unselected and add the newly selected to the list:

public static void TryUpdateManyToMany<T, TKey>(this DbContext db, IEnumerable<T> currentItems, IEnumerable<T> newItems, Func<T, TKey> getKey) where T : class
{
    db.Set<T>().RemoveRange(currentItems.Except(newItems, getKey));
    db.Set<T>().AddRange(newItems.Except(currentItems, getKey));
}

public static IEnumerable<T> Except<T, TKey>(this IEnumerable<T> items, IEnumerable<T> other, Func<T, TKey> getKeyFunc)
{
    return items
        .GroupJoin(other, getKeyFunc, getKeyFunc, (item, tempItems) => new { item, tempItems })
        .SelectMany(t => t.tempItems.DefaultIfEmpty(), (t, temp) => new { t, temp })
        .Where(t => ReferenceEquals(null, t.temp) || t.temp.Equals(default(T)))
        .Select(t => t.t.item);
}

Using it looks like this:

var model = _db.Products
    .Include(x => x.ColorProducts)
    .FirstOrDefault(x => x.ProductId == vm.Product.ProductId);

_db.TryUpdateManyToMany(model.ColorProducts, vm.ColorsSelected
    .Select(x => new ColorProduct
    {
        ColorId = x,
        ProductId = vm.Product.ProductId
    }), x => x.ColorId);
| improve this answer | |
  • Wow, this is amazing. I can use this extension in all of my projects. Thank you for your timely answer. – Talnaci Sergiu Vlad Mar 24 '17 at 7:51
  • The critical part of this solution (and the problem in the OP code) is the Include call. – Ivan Stoev Mar 24 '17 at 8:22
  • AddRange doesn't have Func<T, TKey> getKey parameter – sensei Jan 23 '18 at 23:24
  • Is it a good and efficient way? Or did you find any possible other way? – Mohammed Noureldin May 24 '18 at 23:48
  • Why checking for the equality of null and default? I guess only default is sufficient (as the default for ref types can be null). – Mohammed Noureldin May 25 '18 at 2:55
0

In order to avoid the LINQ hell in the above answer, the templated "Except" method can be rewritten as such:

public static IEnumerable<TEntity> LeftComplementRight<TEntity, TKey>(
        this IEnumerable<TEntity> left,
        IEnumerable<TEntity> right,
        Func<TEntity, TKey> keyRetrievalFunction)
    {
        var leftSet = left.ToList();
        var rightSet = right.ToList();

        var leftSetKeys = leftSet.Select(keyRetrievalFunction);
        var rightSetKeys = rightSet.Select(keyRetrievalFunction);

        var deltaKeys = leftSetKeys.Except(rightSetKeys);
        var leftComplementRightSet = leftSet.Where(i => deltaKeys.Contains(keyRetrievalFunction.Invoke(i)));
        return leftComplementRightSet;
    }

Furthermore the UpdateManyToMany method can be updated to include entities that have been modified as such:

public void UpdateManyToMany<TDependentEntity, TKey>(
        IEnumerable<TDependentEntity> dbEntries,
        IEnumerable<TDependentEntity> updatedEntries,
        Func<TDependentEntity, TKey> keyRetrievalFunction)
        where TDependentEntity : class
    {
        var oldItems = dbEntries.ToList();
        var newItems = updatedEntries.ToList();
        var toBeRemoved = oldItems.LeftComplementRight(newItems, keyRetrievalFunction);
        var toBeAdded = newItems.LeftComplementRight(oldItems, keyRetrievalFunction);
        var toBeUpdated = oldItems.Intersect(newItems, keyRetrievalFunction);

        this.Context.Set<TDependentEntity>().RemoveRange(toBeRemoved);
        this.Context.Set<TDependentEntity>().AddRange(toBeAdded);
        foreach (var entity in toBeUpdated)
        {
            var changed = newItems.Single(i => keyRetrievalFunction.Invoke(i).Equals(keyRetrievalFunction.Invoke(entity)));
            this.Context.Entry(entity).CurrentValues.SetValues(changed);
        }
    }

which uses another custom templated "Intersect" function to find the intersection of the two sets:

public static IEnumerable<TEntity> Intersect<TEntity, TKey>(
        this IEnumerable<TEntity> left,
        IEnumerable<TEntity> right,
        Func<TEntity, TKey> keyRetrievalFunction)
    {
        var leftSet = left.ToList();
        var rightSet = right.ToList();

        var leftSetKeys = leftSet.Select(keyRetrievalFunction);
        var rightSetKeys = rightSet.Select(keyRetrievalFunction);

        var intersectKeys = leftSetKeys.Intersect(rightSetKeys);
        var intersectionEntities = leftSet.Where(i => intersectKeys.Contains(keyRetrievalFunction.Invoke(i)));
        return intersectionEntities;
    }
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