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Using C++11, is it better to #include <cassert> or <assert.h>? Or is there no difference?

Edit:

It seems Should I include <xxxx.h> or <cxxxx> in C++ programs? argues that it comes down to polluting the global namespace. Is this a special case because assert is a macro and there is no std::assert?

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  • @TallBrianL. As I stated in my answer and stackoverflow.com/questions/43011737/…. Neither is wrong, if you use assert.h your program will be backwards compatible with C, if you use cassert, it will definitely not be. Mar 25, 2017 at 4:27
  • 3
    @Santiago Varela But C backwards compatible C++ code? How is that a thing? Backwards compatible C++ code is probably atrocious C++. Even the usual trivial hello world example uses cout which does not exist in C. In practice using the C-style include won’t gain you anything in terms of overall compatibility.
    – besc
    Mar 25, 2017 at 8:30
  • @besc There is tons and tons of C legacy code. A lot of low level and older systems are coded in C. C++ and C interoperability/portability has been and will still be vitally important. stackoverflow.com/questions/4575192/… Mar 25, 2017 at 12:41
  • 1
    @Santiago Varela I’m not questioning interoperability. Especially compiling C as C++ can be incredibly useful. And where would we be without C API layers to glue the world together? What I’m saying is: If you restrict your C++ to the C-compatible subset, then the language you write in is not C++ anymore, it’s C. At that point the question becomes moot because in C the choice between cassert and assert.h does not exist.
    – besc
    Mar 25, 2017 at 15:49

2 Answers 2

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The contents of <cassert> are the same as the C standard library header <assert.h>, except that a macro named static_assert is not defined.1

Prefer <cassert>.

All of the <xxx.h> C headers (including <assert.h>) are deprecated:

D.5 C standard library headers [depr.c.headers]

Update regarding the static_assert macro from C

In D.5 [depr.c.headers], the C++ standard refers to the <xxx.h> headers as "the C headers:

1 For compatibility with the C standard library, the C++ standard library provides the C headers shown in Table 141.

In C++14, the specification referenced C99 (ISO/IEC 9899:1999). C99 did not define the macro static_assert (in any header). C++14 had this to say about <cassert> in 19.3 [assertions]:

2 The contents are the same as the Standard C library header <assert.h>.

C++17 references C11 (SO/IEC 9899:2011) which does define static_assert in <assert.h>, and has this to say about <cassert> in 22.3.1 [cassert.syn]:

1 The contents are the same as the C standard library header <assert.h>, except that a macro named static_assert is not defined.

Both C++14 and C++17 define <assert.h> only by reference to their respective C specifications, and also by this:

See also: ISO C 7.2.

(which is the C section that specifies <assert.h>)

The way I read this, techincally <assert.h>, when compiled with a C++17 compiler, actually does define a macro named static_assert. However doing so would be pointless, and I can't imagine that any implementation actually bothers to do so.

In any event, I stand by my recommendation above:

Prefer <cassert>.

It's just the C++ way to do things. And at least in C++98/03/11/14/17, it avoids depending on deprecated functionality. Who knows what C++20 will bring. But C++20 definitely will not deprecate <cassert>.


1 22.3.1 Header synopsis [cassert.syn]

2 Link to the C++11 specification.

3 Link to the C++17 specification.

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  • 7
    There is a proposal to undeprecate the C headers (I bet you are aware, but not everyone will be): open-std.org/JTC1/SC22/WG21/docs/papers/2017/p0619r0.html#3.5
    – Sjoerd
    Mar 25, 2017 at 3:31
  • @Sjoerd: Excellent comment! This is a proposal for C++20. Mar 25, 2017 at 3:37
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    This answer is somewhat misleading, as it uses "C standard library header" to refer to C's version of <assert.h>, and then the same term to refer to C++'s version of it. To be clear, C defines a macro named static_assert in <assert.h>. C++ defines no such macro in either <cassert> or <assert.h>.
    – user743382
    Mar 25, 2017 at 13:00
  • "Both C++14 and C++17 define <assert.h> only by reference to their respective C specifications" -- [depr.c.headers]p2 is what states that C++'s <assert.h> is defined in terms of <cassert>, which in turn is defined in terms of C's <assert.h>. Since <cassert> lacks a static_assert macro and there is nothing adding it back to C++'s <assert.h>, C++'s <assert.h> lacks it as well. The only possible omission is that [depr.c.headers]p2 appears to import the std-namespace names, but nothing else. assert is a macro but should be defined by <assert.h> as well.
    – user743382
    Mar 27, 2017 at 21:55
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    @HowardHinnant Again you're treating C's <xxx.h> and C++'s <xxx.h> as the same. They're not. C++'s <xxx.h> is like C++'s <cxxx>, except for namespace, which are both different from C's <xxx.h>. 20.2 covers C++'s <xxx.h>. 20.5.1.2 refers to C's <xxx.h>. There's no contradiction. For a case where it matters: C++'s <cstdlib> adds overloads of abs. Those overloads are also visible even if only <stdlib.h> is included. Try it online to see how implementations treat it: coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/515f21d12ce5f2ad
    – user743382
    Mar 28, 2017 at 5:16
10

Looking at code:

Using assert.h   // Compatible with C language standard
---------------
#include <assert.h>

int main() {
    assert(true == true); // Execution continues
    assert(true == false); // Execution will abort with false value assert!
    return 0;
}

Using cassert    // Not compatible with C language standard
--------------
#include <cassert>

int main() {
    assert(true == true); // Execution continues
    assert(true == false); // Execution will abort with false value assert!
    return 0;
}

They both work!


Which one is better in C++11?

Regarding C++11's and C++17's specification:

C.5.1 (section from C++17 document)
Modifications to headers [diff.mods.to.headers]

  1. For compatibility with the C standard library, the C++ standard library provides the C headers enumerated in D.5, but their use is deprecated in C++.

  2. There are no C++ headers for the C headers , <stdnoreturn.h>, and <threads.h>, nor are the C headers themselves part of C++.

  3. The C++ headers (D.4.1) and (D.4.4), as well as their corresponding C headers and , do not contain any of the content from the C standard library and instead merely include other headers from the C++ standard library.


D.5 C standard library headers [depr.c.headers] 1. For compatibility with the C standard library, the C++ standard library provides the C headers shown in Table 141.

enter image description here

Both C++11 and C++17 standard specifications documents state the use of <X.h> remains for compatibility with the C standard, although their use is regarded as deprecated.


Regarding the C++ 20 standard proposal

They are reviewing "undeprecating" the use of the C library headers in C++20. <X.h> appear highlighted in green. C++11 and C++17 deprecation, as of now, is stated as a "weak recommendation" and a "tweak" for keeping the "C standard library headers (c.headers)" is displayed below:

"The basic C library headers are an essential compatibility feature, and not going anywhere anytime soon." (from C++ 20 review document)


D.5 C standard
library headers [depr.c.headers]

Weak recommendation: In addition to the above, also remove the corresponding C headers from the C++ standard, much as we have no corresponding <stdatomic.h>, <stdnoreturn.h>, or <threads.h>, headers. As above, but with the following tweaks: 20.5.5.2.1 C standard library headers [c.headers]

For compatibility with the C standard library, the C++ standard library provides the C headers shown in Table 141. Table 141 — C headers

 <assert.h>  <inttypes.h>   <signal.h>      <stdio.h>   <wchar.h>
 <complex.h> <iso646.h>     <stdalign.h>    <stdlib.h>  <wctype.h>
 <ctype.h>   <limits.h>     <stdarg.h>      <string.h>  
 <errno.h>   <locale.h>     <stdbool.h>     <tgmath.h>
 <fenv.h>    <math.h>       <stddef.h>      <time.h>
 <float.h>   <setjmp.h>     <stdint.h>      <uchar.h>

The header <complex.h> behaves as if it simply includes the header . The header <tgmath.h> behaves as if it simply includes the headers <complex> and <cmath>.


Bjarne Stroustrup recommends maximising inter-operability between the C and C++ languages, by reducing imcompatibilities as much as possible. Others argue otherwise, as it complicates things.

So, it seems <X.h> aren't going anywhere. Ultimately, you can use both. Personally, I would make the decision of which one I would use boil down to having your code backwards compatible with C code or not.

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  • where did you get that <cX> headers already use and include <X.h> headers? <cX> headers just puts things in std namespace, and optionally in global namespace, cstdio stdio.h namespace
    – phuclv
    Mar 25, 2017 at 2:55
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    "As <cX> headers already use and include <X.h> headers." - This may be a common implementation that you've run into a lot, but it's not really a correct general statement. Nothing says that has to be the case. I mean, I'm looking at mingw's <cmath> right now and it does a lot more than just include math.h. Other than that I don't see any real problems with this answer's wording.
    – Jason C
    Mar 25, 2017 at 3:09
  • @Sjoerd, are you contributing to C++20? Mar 25, 2017 at 3:50
  • @JasonC the <cX> headers are not required to include <X.h> because they're not required to put things in the global namespace, although many do. OTOH <X.h> are not required to put things in std namespace
    – phuclv
    Mar 25, 2017 at 3:53
  • This answer has been cloned to the original question, so its value here seems limited. I suggest deleting this one and letting people find the other via the duplicate question link. Mar 27, 2017 at 20:29

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