54

Is there a clean way to return a new object that omits certain properties that the original object contains without having to use something like lodash?

4

15 Answers 15

96
const { bar, baz, ...qux } = foo

Now your object qux has all of the properties of foo except for bar and baz.

4
  • 2
    Keep in mind, this will not clone the object. Updating any values ion qux will update the values in foo. Javascript objects are passed by reference. Mar 12 '19 at 1:17
  • 13
    @MiroslavGlamuzina that's not correct. If you change a value in qux then foo's value will not be updated. However, if the value of a property of qux is an object and you change something in that object, then the object referenced by the corresponding property of foo would also be changed. Jan 29 '20 at 5:51
  • Just a small note, in chrome (as of version 87.0.4280.141), this doesn't work with quoted property names. I don't know about other environments: const { "bar", 'baz', ...qux } = foo
    – Sledge
    Feb 4 at 3:23
  • @Sledge some of your keys are quoted, that's probably why
    – surjikal
    Jul 31 at 1:52
32

If you know the list of the properties that you want preserved as well as omitted, the following "whitelisting" approach should work:

const exampleFilter = ({ keepMe, keepMeToo }) => ({ keepMe, keepMeToo })

console.log(
  exampleFilter({
    keepMe: 'keepMe',
    keepMeToo: 'keepMeToo',
    omitMe: 'omitMe',
    omitMeToo: 'omitMeToo'
  })
)

5
  • This has blown my mind, could you explain how it works? Mar 25 '17 at 2:25
  • It uses a combination of parameter destructuring and default object values (each key is mapped to the value held by the variable of the same name, e.g. { keepMe, keepMeToo } is like { keepMe: keepMe, keepMeToo: keepMeToo }.
    – gyre
    Mar 25 '17 at 2:30
  • 1
    Thanks! Cracking answer and upvoted for awesomeness. Mar 25 '17 at 2:37
  • Wow! Thank you for this! I was struggling with finding an answer, and then this came up! This solved my problem beautifully
    – J.H
    Sep 4 '20 at 22:45
  • Great anwser! Wonder if there is a way to avoid duplicating field names, couldn't find any.
    – Camilo
    Jan 30 at 22:52
26

In modern environments you can use this code snippet:

function omit(key, obj) {
  const { [key]: omitted, ...rest } = obj;
  return rest;
}
1
  • 2
    "modern environments" meaning if you're shipping un-transpiled code, this will work on 93% of browsers. See full compatibility at caniuse.com/…
    – Dawson B
    Feb 4 at 19:18
21
const {omittedPropertyA, omittedPropertyB, ...remainingObject} = originalObject;

Explanation:

With ES7

you could use object destructuring and the spread operator to omit properties from a javascript object:

const animalObject = { 'bear': 1, 'snake': '2', 'cow': 3 };
 
const {bear, ...other} = animalObject

// other is: { 'snake': '2', 'cow:'  3}

source: https://remotedevdaily.com/two-ways-to-omit-properties-from-a-javascript-object/

3
  • I find this solution super helpful, but I’m working with a large object ( about 200 key pairs ) and I want to create a new object that has only the values I specify ( about 30 ) , not the values I don’t want ( which would be about 160 ). Even 30 values seems like a lot so I wonder if I can pass in an array?
    – ETHan
    Jul 18 '20 at 4:14
  • can i use a variable instead of bear inside const {bear, ...other} = Sep 7 '20 at 17:28
  • @SamuraiJack yes you can. const fieldName = 'bear'; const {[fieldName]: _, ...other} = animalObject
    – brianbhsu
    Jan 14 at 20:31
13

There's the blacklist package on npm which has a very flexible api.

Also a situational trick using the object rest-spread proposal (stage-3).

const {a, b, ...rest} = {a: 1, b: 2, c: 3, d: 4};
a // 1
b // 2
rest // {c: 3, d: 4}

This is often used in react components where you want to use a few properties and pass the rest as props to a <div {...props} /> or similar.

12

const x = {obj1: 1, obj2: 3, obj3:26};


const {obj1,obj2, ...rest} = x;
console.log(rest)
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/d3/4.9.1/d3.min.js"></script>

1
  • Note that if you use a linter such as eslint, it could flag unused variables as errors with this approach.
    – Kev
    Apr 28 at 10:45
9

Omit and array of keys, using ES7 w/ recursion.

function omit(keys, obj) {
  if (!keys.length) return obj
  const { [keys.pop()]: omitted, ...rest } = obj;
  return omit(keys, rest);
}

This builds on top of @Eddie Cooro answer.

2
  • 4
    non-recursive version: ` function omit(keys, obj) { return keys.reduce((a, e) => { const { [e]: omit, ...rest } = a; return rest; }, obj) } ` Aug 5 '20 at 19:33
  • typescript non recursive version: export function omitObjectKeys<T extends object = {}>( keys: string[], obj: T, ): Partial<T> { return (keys as any).reduce((a: Partial<T>, e: keyof T) => { const { [e]: omitted, ...rest } = a; return rest; }, obj); } Jun 3 at 14:36
3

Sure, why not something like:

var original = {
  name: 'Rory',
  state: 'Bored',
  age: '27'
};

var copied = Object.assign({}, original);
delete copied.age;

console.log(copied);

https://jsfiddle.net/4nL08zk4/

3

You can use Object.assign(), delete

var not = ["a", "b"]; // properties to delete from obj object
var o = Object.assign({}, obj);
for (let n of not) delete o[n];

Alternatively

var props = ["c", "d"];
let o = Object.assign({}, ...props.map(prop => ({[prop]:obj[prop]})));
3

A solution that hasn't been mentioned yet:

Omit single

o = {a: 5, b: 6, c: 7}
Object.fromEntries(Object.entries(o).filter(e => e[0] != 'b'))
// Object { a: 5, c: 7 }

Omit multiple

o = {a: 1, b: 2, c: 3, d: 4}
exclude = new Set(['a', 'b'])
Object.fromEntries(Object.entries(o).filter(e => !exclude.has(e[0])))
// Object { c: 3, d: 4 }

The Set above is used because it leads to linearithmic complexity even if the number of elements in exclude is in the same asymptotic equivalence class as the number of elements in o.

2
  • Good one! Hint: You don't necessarily have to create a set using exclude = ['a', 'b'] and Object.fromEntries(Object.entries(o).filter(e => !exclude.includes(e[0]))) would suffice (besides the confusing exclude.includes of curse :D).
    – shaedrich
    Apr 13 at 13:39
  • You're right. Didn't think of that. Sound be more performant.
    – shaedrich
    Apr 13 at 15:54
1
function omitKeys(obj, keys) {
        var target = {}; 

        for (var i in obj) { 
            if (keys.indexOf(i) >= 0) continue;
            if (!Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(obj, i)) continue; 

            target[i] = obj[i]; 
        } 

        return target; 
    }
1

var obj = {
  a: 1,
  b: 2,
  c: 3,
  d: {
    c: 3,
    e: 5
  }
};

Object.extract = function(obj, keys, exclude) {
  var clone = Object.assign({}, obj);
  if (keys && (keys instanceof Array)) {
    for (var k in clone) {
      var hasKey = keys.indexOf(k) >= 0;
      if ((!hasKey && !exclude) || (hasKey && exclude)) {
        delete clone[k];
      }
    }
  }
  return clone;
};

console.log('Extract specified keys: \n-----------------------');
var clone1 = Object.extract(obj, ['a', 'd']);
console.log(clone1);
console.log('Exclude specified keys: \n-----------------------');
var clone2 = Object.extract(obj, ['a', 'd'], true);
console.log(clone2);

0

One solution, I'm sure many others exist.

const testObj = {
    prop1: 'value1',
    prop2: 'value2',
    prop3: 'value3'
};

const removeProps = (...propsToFilter) => obj => {
   return Object.keys(obj)
   .filter(key => !propsToFilter.includes(key))
   .reduce((newObj, key) => {
       newObj[key] = obj[key];
       return newObj;
   }, {});
};


console.log(removeProps('prop3')(testObj));
console.log(removeProps('prop1', 'prop2')(testObj));

Edit: I always forget about delete...

const testObj = {
    prop1: 'value1',
    prop2: 'value2',
    prop3: 'value3'
};

const removeProps = (...propsToFilter) => obj => {
   const newObj = Object.assign({}, obj);
   propsToFilter.forEach(key => delete newObj[key]);
   return newObj;
};


console.log(removeProps('prop3')(testObj));
console.log(removeProps('prop1', 'prop2')(testObj));

0

If you already use lodash, you may also do omit(obj, ["properties", "to", "omit"]) to get a new Object without the properties provided in the array.

0

I saw this question and I wanted to remove 1 specific key, not a full method, so here's my suggestion:

const originalObj = {wantedKey: 111, anotherWantedKey: 222, unwantedKey: 1010};
const cleanedObj = Object.assign(originalObj, {unwantedKey: undefined});
1
  • It does not work this way: if you have the value in the source - it overwrites the corresponding value in the target. In the given case, unwantedKey will be copied and be 1010.
    – Alexander
    Dec 1 '20 at 14:52

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