62

The desired behaviour is to pass an argument (text) to the onClick handler to console.log it but it seems that I'm doing something wrong with the syntax.

If I leave the argument out as below, it's working fine:

export default class Nav extends Component {
  componentDidMount() {
    this.props.pickNumber(3);
  }

  onPress() {
    console.log('FOOOBAAR');
  }
  render() {
    return (
      <View>
        <Text>####################</Text>
        <Text>Intro Screen</Text>
        <Text>Number: {this.props.numbers}</Text>
        <TouchableHighlight onPress={this.onPress.bind(this)}>
          <Text>Go to Foo</Text>
        </TouchableHighlight>
      </View>
    );
  }

}

However, if I want to pass an argument to the onPress handler, it complains 'Cannot read property 'bind' of undefined.

export default class Nav extends Component {
  componentDidMount() {
    this.props.pickNumber(3);
  }

  onPress(txt) {
    console.log(txt);
  }
  render() {
    return (
      <View>
        <Text>####################</Text>
        <Text>Intro Screen</Text>
        <Text>Number: {this.props.numbers}</Text>
        <TouchableHighlight onPress={this.onPress('foo').bind(this)}>
          <Text>Go to Foo</Text>
        </TouchableHighlight>
      </View>
    );
  }

}

Thanks

Addition: If I change it to:

onPress={this.onPress.bind('foo')}

it does not work either.

1
  • As an aside, technically, bind is not necessary at all in this case since this is not referenced in the onPress function.
    – Ryan H.
    Aug 13 '18 at 20:16
69

You can do the binding in the constructor by using ES6:

export default class Nav extends Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);

    this.onPress = this.onPress.bind(this);
  }

and then

  onPress(txt) {
    console.log(txt);
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <View>
        <Text>####################</Text>
        <Text>Intro Screen</Text>
        <Text>Number: {this.props.numbers}</Text>
        <TouchableHighlight onPress={() => this.onPress('foo')}>
          <Text>Go to Foo</Text>
        </TouchableHighlight>
      </View>
    );
  }
}
8
  • 1
    It removes the error but the 'foo' string gets console.logged automatically without me even clicking.
    – Wasteland
    Mar 25 '17 at 15:50
  • 1
    Sorry, I've updated my answer. You need to add () => before this.onPress('foo').
    – inga
    Mar 25 '17 at 15:54
  • 2
    Without the fat arrow function, we are executing a function instead of giving onPress a function so we need the arrow function to create a function for onPress.
    – inga
    Mar 25 '17 at 16:22
  • 9
    no need to bind the function when you use onPress={() => } because it is done automaticaly
    – AlainIb
    May 3 '18 at 9:32
  • 2
    The reason you use the fat arrow is as follows: this.onPress.bind(this) returns the bound function and this is passed to the onPress prop. However, this.onPress('foo') without the fat arrow will call the function onPress immediately with the parameter foo. Since this function doesn't explicitly return anything, undefined gets returned and this is what is passed to the onPress prop. However, the onPress property is expecting a function to execute only after the user clicks. () => creates (and returns) a function using ES6 syntax.
    – Ryan H.
    Aug 13 '18 at 20:04
36

You can avoid binding the function in the constructor by binding it at the onPress value and passing the argument after 'this'. You can refactor your code like so,

export default class Nav extends Component {
  componentDidMount() {
    this.props.pickNumber(3);
  }

  onPress(txt) {
    console.log(txt);  // foo
  }
  render() {
    return (
      <View>
        <Text>####################</Text>
        <Text>Intro Screen</Text>
        <Text>Number: {this.props.numbers}</Text>
        <TouchableHighlight onPress={this.onPress.bind(this,'foo')}>
          <Text>Go to Foo</Text>
        </TouchableHighlight>
      </View>
    );
  }

}

The first argument is 'this' and any other arguments can be supplied after that which will be received in the same order.

Update : Can do this using closures too.

export default class Nav extends Component {
  componentDidMount() {
    this.props.pickNumber(3);
  }

  onPress = (this, txt) => () => {
    console.log(txt);  // foo
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <View>
        <Text>####################</Text>
        <Text>Intro Screen</Text>
        <Text>Number: {this.props.numbers}</Text>
        <TouchableHighlight onPress={this.onPress(this,'foo')}>
          <Text>Go to Foo</Text>
        </TouchableHighlight>
      </View>
    );
  }

}
6
  • Very handy indeed since the fat arrow functions will ppbly trigger re-renders as react cannot cache this
    – 4levels
    Mar 9 '19 at 17:42
  • 1
    eslint doesn't really like this: github.com/yannickcr/eslint-plugin-react/blob/master/docs/rules/…
    – antgel
    Mar 15 '19 at 21:32
  • This should be the preferred answer, as it avoids creating a new anonymous function each press as the most highly rated answer will do...
    – duhaime
    Sep 8 '19 at 11:49
  • Not true, this.onPress.bind(this, 'foo') still leads to re-render. So this method has the same effect as the fat arrow function. Jan 14 '20 at 0:28
  • @FanchenBao so, how did you fix it? Jan 8 at 9:58
22

You can solve it with fat arrows too:

export default class Nav extends Component {

  handlePress = (text) => {
    console.log(text);
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <View>
        <Text>####################</Text>
        <Text>Intro Screen</Text>
        <Text>Number: {this.props.numbers}</Text>
        <TouchableHighlight onPress={() => this.handlePress('weeeeee')}>
          <Text>Go to Foo</Text>
      </TouchableHighlight>
    </View>
    );
  }
}
1
  • 1
    This method works, but it's less efficient. Whenever you tap that variable, the function needs to be created, and then executed. If you use the function definition, and then the bind, whenever you tap, the function only gets called and it isn't created every time.
    – fer.reyes4
    Oct 1 '18 at 16:59
12

You should just pass one fat arrow function before calling the function.

onPress= {()=> this.handlePress(param)}
1
  • This is far and away the most simple and straight forward answer thank you!
    – Cole Perry
    Jul 23 '20 at 0:38
1

Define function and call it onPress of Text. If you are iterating over array then you can also pass title

  selectText = (item) => {
            console.log(item) // will print Text Pressed
            alert(item)
      }
   return(
       <View>
       <Text onPress = {()=>this.selectText("Text Pressed")}>Press for Alert</Text>
       </View>
    }
0

try this

const onChangeHandler = index => { console.log(index) }
onPress={onChangeHandler.bind(this, index)}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.