I have spent the better part of a few hours trying to find a way to auto-increment versions in a .NETCoreApp 1.1 (Visual Studio 2017).

I know the the AssemblyInfo.cs is being created dynamically in the folder: obj/Debug/netcoreapp1.1/

It does not accept the old method of: [assembly: System.Reflection.AssemblyFileVersionAttribute("1.0.0.*")]

If I set the project to package I can set versions there but this seems to be used to build the AssemblyInfo.cs file.

My question is, has anyone figured out how to control version in .NET Core (or .NETStandard for that matter) projects.

  • I don't know how far you got with this, but looks like I asked almost the same question a different way ( stackoverflow.com/a/43280282/685341 ) - Maybe the accepted answer to this question will help you out; you can just pass the /p: flag to dotnet msbuild in your build script and set version, company, copyright... all that good stuff. – Jay Apr 10 '17 at 20:45
  • 2
    Thanks for the info. That just open up additional options. – Jason H Apr 10 '17 at 20:49
  • Previously * was supported for AssemblyVersion, not for AssemblyFileVersion- see Can I automatically increment the file build version when using Visual Studio? – Michael Freidgeim Oct 28 '17 at 0:42
  • 1
    FWIW the wildcard in the assembly version is not supported because for these new project, the compiler's "deterministic" mode is active by default. Since auto-increment would break determinism (same input > same output) it is disallowed in that mode. You can set <Deterministic>False</Deterministic> in the csproj to use it. (or use any other MSbuild logic to calculate <VersionPrefix>/<Version>) – Martin Ullrich Oct 28 '17 at 9:20

13 Answers 13

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I have been looking for a version incrementer for a Net Core app in VS2017 using the csproj configuration format.

I found a project called dotnet bump that worked for the project.json format but struggled to find a solution for the .csproj format. The writer the the dotnet bump actually came up with the solution for the .csproj format and it is called MSBump.

There is a project on GitHub for it at:

https://github.com/BalassaMarton/MSBump

where you can see the code and its available on Nuget too. Just search for MSBump on Nuget.

  • 1
    I recommend using the latest 2.1.0 release of MSBump, It supports switching configurations better, and also sets the version for the current build, not the next one (like the previous version). – Márton Balassa Aug 12 '17 at 16:51
  • I see it now also supports MSBuild whereas before it required visual studio. – ravetroll Nov 25 '17 at 18:27
  • 1
    Yes, and it also supports multi-targeting projects. – Márton Balassa Dec 13 '17 at 9:01
  • 2
    Consider using GitVersioning. It may be suitable to run on your CI environment. github.com/AArnott/Nerdbank.GitVersioning – Henrique Feb 21 at 20:20
  • MSBump increments version on every build even if you didn't change anything, this causes a lot of problems in a long term. And sometimes versions go out of sync and one version is behind the other. – Konrad Oct 10 at 11:42

If you're using Visual Studio Team Services/TFS or some other CI build process to has versioning built-in, you can utilize msbuild's Condition attribute, for example:

<Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk.Web">

  <PropertyGroup>
    <Version Condition=" '$(BUILD_BUILDNUMBER)' == '' ">0.0.1-local</Version>
    <Version Condition=" '$(BUILD_BUILDNUMBER)' != '' ">$(BUILD_BUILDNUMBER)</Version>
    <TargetFramework>netcoreapp1.1</TargetFramework>
  </PropertyGroup>

  <ItemGroup>
    <Folder Include="wwwroot\" />
  </ItemGroup>
  <ItemGroup>
    <PackageReference Include="Microsoft.ApplicationInsights.AspNetCore" Version="2.0.0" />
    <PackageReference Include="Microsoft.AspNetCore" Version="1.1.2" />
    <PackageReference Include="Microsoft.Extensions.Caching.Memory" Version="1.1.2" />
  </ItemGroup>

</Project>

This will tell the .NET Core compiler to use whatever is in the BUILD_BUILDNUMBER environment variable if it's present, or fallback to 0.0.1-local if you're doing a build on your local machine.

  • Nice, I like this approach because the enviornment variables can just be set at build server while these conditionals deteremine the assembly set in the binaries. – joey Aug 21 '17 at 5:35
  • Doesn't seem to work on TFS 2010, but hopefully we are moving off that soon! – Mark Adamson Oct 10 '17 at 19:54
  • Not a bad solution, though could be a bit of work if the solution has a lot of projects. – tofutim Jan 2 at 7:09

Add <Deterministic>False</Deterministic> inside a <PropertyGroup> section  of .csproj

The workaround to make AssemblyVersion * working is described in “Confusing error message for wildcard in [AssemblyVersion] on .Net Core #22660”

Wildcards are only allowed if the build is not deterministic, which is the default for .Net Core projects. Adding <Deterministic>False</Deterministic> to csproj fixes the issue.

The reasons why .Net Core Developers consider Deterministic Builds beneficial described in http://blog.paranoidcoding.com/2016/04/05/deterministic-builds-in-roslyn.html and Compilers should be deterministic: same inputs generate same outputs #372

However if you are using TeamCity, TFS or other CI/CD tool, it's probably better to keep the version number controlled and incremented by them and pass to build as a parameter (as it was suggested in other answers) , e.g.

msbuild /t:build /p:Version=YourVersionNumber /p:AssemblyVersion=YourVersionNumber

Package number for NuGet packages

msbuild /t:pack /p:Version=YourVersionNumber   
  • Thank you! I knew there was a hidden lever for opening the treasure room! I am migrating an old project to the new .NET SDK, and I really wanted to do this fast, without the hassle of finding automated version increment solutions. In fact, the more compatible to the old ways the better for my case. – Ivaylo Slavov Feb 6 at 19:34
  • 1
    This is the correct answer. – Ian Kemp Apr 18 at 10:21
  • This is the best answer IMO. It allows for the build tooling to work properly. At least I can use an external mechanism to feed the number into the build now. – Michael Yanni Aug 30 at 17:42
  • Please expand your answer just a little bit more: the suggested addition needs to go into the <PropertyGroup> section of .csproj. And thanks for this great answer, off course! – gerardv Sep 9 at 19:32
  • @gerardv, done, but you can do improving edits by yourself stackoverflow.com/help/editing – Michael Freidgeim Sep 9 at 21:37

I came up with solution that worked almost the same as old AssemblyVersion attribute with star (*) - AssemblyVersion("1.0.")*

Values for AssemblyVersion and AssemblyFileVersion is in MSBuild project .csproj file (not in AssemblyInfo.cs) as property FileVersion (generates AssemblyFileVersionAttribute) and AssemblyVersion (generates AssemblyVersionAttribute). In MSBuild process we use our custom MSBuild task to generate version numbers and then we override values of these FileVersion and AssemblyVersion properties with new values from task.

So first we create our custom MSBuild task GetCurrentBuildVersion:

public class GetCurrentBuildVersion : Task
{
    [Output]
    public string Version { get; set; }
 
    public string BaseVersion { get; set; }
 
    public override bool Execute()
    {
        var originalVersion = System.Version.Parse(this.BaseVersion ?? "1.0.0");
 
        this.Version = GetCurrentBuildVersionString(originalVersion);
 
        return true;
    }
 
    private static string GetCurrentBuildVersionString(Version baseVersion)
    {
        DateTime d = DateTime.Now;
        return new Version(baseVersion.Major, baseVersion.Minor,
            (DateTime.Today - new DateTime(2000, 1, 1)).Days,
            ((int)new TimeSpan(d.Hour, d.Minute, d.Second).TotalSeconds) / 2).ToString();
    }
}

Task class inherit from Microsoft.Build.Utilities.Task class from Microsoft.Build.Utilities.Core NuGet package. It takes BaseVersion property (optional) on input and returns generated version in Version output property. The logic to get version numbers is same as .NET automatic versioning (Build number is days count since 1/1/2000 and Revision is half seconds since midnight).

To build this MSBuild task, we use .NET Standard 1.3 class library project type with this class.

.csproj file can looks like this:

<Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk">
  <PropertyGroup>
    <TargetFramework>netstandard1.3</TargetFramework>
    <AssemblyName>DC.Build.Tasks</AssemblyName>
    <RootNamespace>DC.Build.Tasks</RootNamespace>
    <PackageId>DC.Build.Tasks</PackageId>
    <AssemblyTitle>DC.Build.Tasks</AssemblyTitle>
  </PropertyGroup>
 
  <ItemGroup>
    <PackageReference Include="Microsoft.Build.Framework" Version="15.1.1012" />
    <PackageReference Include="Microsoft.Build.Utilities.Core" Version="15.1.1012" />
  </ItemGroup>
</Project>

This task project is also available in my GitHub holajan/DC.Build.Tasks

Now we setup MSBuild to use this task and set FileVersion and AssemblyVersion properties. In .csproj file it looks like this:

<Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk">
  <UsingTask TaskName="GetCurrentBuildVersion" AssemblyFile="$(MSBuildThisFileFullPath)\..\..\DC.Build.Tasks.dll" />
 
  <PropertyGroup>
    ...
    <AssemblyVersion>1.0.0.0</AssemblyVersion>
    <FileVersion>1.0.0.0</FileVersion>
  </PropertyGroup>
 
  ...
 
  <Target Name="BeforeBuildActionsProject1" BeforeTargets="BeforeBuild">
    <GetCurrentBuildVersion BaseVersion="$(FileVersion)">
      <Output TaskParameter="Version" PropertyName="FileVersion" />
    </GetCurrentBuildVersion>
    <PropertyGroup>
      <AssemblyVersion>$(FileVersion)</AssemblyVersion>
    </PropertyGroup>
  </Target>
 
</Project>

Importtant things here:

  • Mentioned UsingTask imports GetCurrentBuildVersion task from DC.Build.Tasks.dll. It assumes that this dll file is located on parent directory from your .csproj file.
  • Our BeforeBuildActionsProject1 Target that calls task must have unique name per project in case we have more projects in the solution which calls GetCurrentBuildVersion task.

The advantage of this solution is that it works not only from builds on build server, but also in manual builds from dotnet build or Visual Studio.

  • 4
    I'd recommend to use DateTime.UtcNow instead of DateTime.Now in method GetCurrentBuildVersionString() in particular if the code is executed on automated build machines. They may run at 2 am or 3 am in the morning when your computer switches to / from daylight savings time. With DateTime.Now in that scenario you might be going backwards in terms of version. Admittedly, this is a corner case and I also admit that I'm picky. :-) Also, the problem goes also away if you configure the same timezone on all build machines and not to adjust to daylight savings time. – Manfred Aug 1 '17 at 21:02
  • Is there a NuGet package for this yet? – Jonathan Allen Dec 19 '17 at 22:00
  • @Jonathan Allen No, I have no plan for nuget package, because of different name in each project. You can download compiled build task assemby in github.com/holajan/DC.Build.Tasks/tree/master/dist folder – HolaJan Dec 21 '17 at 19:36
  • We've been using a custom console app to pull our version from a server and generate the AssemblyInfo.cs file before builds. THis approach is perfect for what we do. Have you been able to use this method to push the version in "Version" of the pack feature of the new projects? It would be nice, but I guess we can fall back to using nuget.exe to package too as we will need it to publish also. – David Ritchie Apr 14 at 21:37

These values are now set in the .csproj file:

<PropertyGroup>
    <TargetFramework>netcoreapp1.1</TargetFramework>
    <AssemblyVersion>1.0.6.0</AssemblyVersion>
    <FileVersion>1.0.6.0</FileVersion>
    <Version>1.0.1</Version>
</PropertyGroup>

These are the same values you see if you go in the Package tab in the project settings. While I don't think you can use * to autoincrement the version, what you can do is introduce a post-processing step that replaces the versions for you (e.g. as part of your continuous integration).

  • 5
    I was afraid this would be the answer. I will see if I can do a pre-build step to increment it. – Jason H Mar 25 '17 at 18:14
  • 3
    As pointed out in another thread, the new csproj format allows you to turn off the auto-generation of the assemblyinfo file and for you to specify your own. I followed the advice of natemcmaster's answer here and used a standard AssemblyInfo.cs file: stackoverflow.com/questions/42138418/… – James Eby Jun 22 '17 at 19:34
  • 4
    Why did they remove the auto-increment? It worked really well and very simply for me for years. I push master, CI builds and increments, then the version is read directly from the built DLL using some PS script, then use that version as an arg when pushing to NuGet. So simple. Now broken. – Luke Puplett Aug 30 '17 at 11:46
  • 1
    @LukePuplett same here. so frustrating! – Shimmy Oct 10 '17 at 8:54
  • @LukePuplett: See [“Confusing error message for wildcard in AssemblyVersion on .Net Core #22660”] (github.com/dotnet/roslyn/issues/22660), The reasons why they consider Deterministic Builds beneficial described in blog.paranoidcoding.com/2016/04/05/… and Compilers should be deterministic: same inputs generate same outputs #372<github.com/dotnet/roslyn/issues/372> – Michael Freidgeim Oct 28 '17 at 1:13

dotnet build /p:AssemblyVersion=1.2.3.4

I was responding to: "has anyone figured out how to control version in .NET Core (or .NETStandard for that matter) projects." I found this question trying to solve this problem in the context of a CI build. I wanted to set the assembly version to the CI build number.

  • The title says "Auto Versioning in Visual Studio 2017 (.NET Core)". Where exactly building it manually complies to "Visual Studio 2017"? – JCKödel Aug 2 '17 at 17:31
  • 4
    I was responding to: "has anyone figured out how to control version in .NET Core (or .NETStandard for that matter) projects." I found this question trying to solve this problem in the context of a CI build. I wanted to set the assembly version to the CI build number. I'm sorry if you feel this wasn't relevant to the question at hand. – Chris McKenzie Aug 2 '17 at 19:37
  • It's a helpful component for me thanks. I will use this as part of a CI solution – Mark Adamson Sep 26 '17 at 21:31
  • 1
    /p:AssemblyVersion= also works with msbuild – Mark Adamson Sep 26 '17 at 21:32
  • 1
    @ChrisMcKenzie: your comment should be included in your answer to make your intent clear – Michael Freidgeim Oct 28 '17 at 5:08

I made a simple CLI tool for setting .csproj .NET Core version strings here. You can combine it with tools like GitVersion for automatic version bumping during CI builds, if that's what you're after.

  • Very clean, good job. – Jason H Apr 3 '17 at 21:31
  • @JasonH Thanks, let me know if you have any issues with it. – Tagc Apr 3 '17 at 21:32
  • goddamn genius. love it! – pms1969 Jul 13 '17 at 11:59

I accepted the above answer because @Gigi is correct (as of now) but I was annoyed and came up with the following PowerShell Scripts.

First I have the script in my solution folder (UpdateBuildVersion.ps1):

#Get Path to csproj
$path = "$PSScriptRoot\src\ProjectFolder\ProjectName.csproj"

#Read csproj (XML)
$xml = [xml](Get-Content $path)

#Retrieve Version Nodes
$assemblyVersion = $xml.Project.PropertyGroup.AssemblyVersion
$fileVersion = $xml.Project.PropertyGroup.FileVersion

#Split the Version Numbers
$avMajor, $avMinor, $avBuild  = $assemblyVersion.Split(".")
$fvMajor, $fvMinor, $fvBuild = $fileVersion.Split(".")

#Increment Revision
$avBuild = [Convert]::ToInt32($avBuild,10)+1
$fvBuild = [Convert]::ToInt32($fvBuild,10)+1

#Put new version back into csproj (XML)
$xml.Project.PropertyGroup.AssemblyVersion = "$avMajor.$avMinor.$avBuild"
$xml.Project.PropertyGroup.FileVersion = "$fvMajor.$fvMinor.$fvBuild"

#Save csproj (XML)
$xml.Save($path)

I added this to csproj file:

<Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk">
  <PropertyGroup>
    <AssemblyVersion>0.0.1</AssemblyVersion>
    <FileVersion>0.0.1</FileVersion>
    <PreBuildEvent>powershell.exe –NonInteractive –ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted -command "& {$(SolutionDir)UpdateBuildVersion.ps1}"</PreBuildEvent>
  </PropertyGroup>
</Project>

Even through its set to be a PreBuildEvent, the fact is the version numbers do not get updated until AFTER the file has been loaded into memory so the version number will not reflect until the next build. In fact, you could change it to a PostBuildEvent and it would have the same effect.

I also created the following two scripts: (UpdateMinorVersion.ps1)

#Get Path to csproj
$path = "$PSScriptRoot\src\ProjectFolder\ProjectName.csproj"

#Read csproj (XML)
$xml = [xml](Get-Content $path)

#Retrieve Version Nodes
$assemblyVersion = $xml.Project.PropertyGroup.AssemblyVersion
$fileVersion = $xml.Project.PropertyGroup.FileVersion

#Split the Version Numbers
$avMajor, $avMinor, $avBuild  = $assemblyVersion.Split(".")
$fvMajor, $fvMinor, $fvBuild = $fileVersion.Split(".")

#Increment Minor Version - Will reset all sub nodes
$avMinor = [Convert]::ToInt32($avMinor,10)+1
$fvMinor = [Convert]::ToInt32($fvMinor,10)+1
$avBuild = 0
$fvBuild = 0

#Put new version back into csproj (XML)
$xml.Project.PropertyGroup.AssemblyVersion = "$avMajor.$avMinor.$avBuild"
$xml.Project.PropertyGroup.FileVersion = "$fvMajor.$fvMinor.$fvBuild"

#Save csproj (XML)
$xml.Save($path)

(UpdateMajorVersion.ps1)

#Get Path to csproj
$path = "$PSScriptRoot\src\ProjectFolder\ProjectName.csproj"

#Read csproj (XML)
$xml = [xml](Get-Content $path)

#Retrieve Version Nodes
$assemblyVersion = $xml.Project.PropertyGroup.AssemblyVersion
$fileVersion = $xml.Project.PropertyGroup.FileVersion

#Split the Version Numbers
$avMajor, $avMinor, $avBuild  = $assemblyVersion.Split(".")
$fvMajor, $fvMinor, $fvBuild = $fileVersion.Split(".")

#Increment Major Version - Will reset all sub nodes
$avMajor = [Convert]::ToInt32($avMajor,10)+1
$fvMajor = [Convert]::ToInt32($fvMajor,10)+1
$avMinor = 0
$fvMinor = 0
$avBuild = 0
$fvBuild = 0

#Put new version back into csproj (XML)
$xml.Project.PropertyGroup.AssemblyVersion = "$avMajor.$avMinor.$avBuild"
$xml.Project.PropertyGroup.FileVersion = "$fvMajor.$fvMinor.$fvBuild"

#Save csproj (XML)
$xml.Save($path)

To enable versioning of your .Net Core / .Net Whatever project based on your GIT setup, using the tags/describe functionality of GIT.

I have been using a Prebuild.targets.xml file which is located in the root folder for the project and included in the csproj file like:

<Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk">
  <Import Project="PreBuild.targets.xml" />
  ...
  <PropertyGroup>
    <GenerateAssemblyInfo>false</GenerateAssemblyInfo>

Use the "GenerateAssembyInfo" tag to disable automatic assembly info generation.

Then the Prebuild.targets.xml will generate a CommonAssemblyInfo.cs file where you can include the version tags you want based on your GIT version

NOTE: I have found the Prebuilds.targets.xml somewhere else, so havent bothered cleaning it up .)

The Prebuild.targets.xml file:

    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
    <Project ToolsVersion="4.0" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003">

      <UsingTask
        TaskName="GetVersion"
        TaskFactory="CodeTaskFactory"
        AssemblyFile="$(MSBuildToolsPath)\Microsoft.Build.Tasks.v4.0.dll" >
        <ParameterGroup>
          <VersionString ParameterType="System.String" Required="true" />
          <Version ParameterType="System.String" Output="true" />
          <Commit ParameterType="System.String" Output="true" />
          <VersionSuffix ParameterType="System.String" Output="true" />
        </ParameterGroup>
        <Task>
          <!--<Reference Include="" />-->
          <Using Namespace="System"/>
          <Using Namespace="System.IO"/>
          <Using Namespace="System.Text.RegularExpressions" />
          <Code Type="Fragment" Language="cs">
            <![CDATA[
              var match = Regex.Match(VersionString, @"^(?<major>\d+)\.(?<minor>\d+)(\.?(?<patch>\d+))?-(?<revision>\d+)-(?<commit>[a-z0-9-]+)$");
              int major, minor, patch, revision;
              Int32.TryParse(match.Groups["major"].Value, out major);
              Int32.TryParse(match.Groups["minor"].Value, out minor);
              Int32.TryParse(match.Groups["patch"].Value, out patch);
              Int32.TryParse(match.Groups["revision"].Value, out revision);
              _Version = new Version(major, minor, patch, revision).ToString();
              _Commit = match.Groups["commit"].Value;
            ]]>
          </Code>
        </Task>
      </UsingTask>

      <UsingTask
        TaskName="GitExistsInPath"
        TaskFactory="CodeTaskFactory"
        AssemblyFile="$(MSBuildToolsPath)\Microsoft.Build.Tasks.v4.0.dll" >
        <ParameterGroup>
          <Exists ParameterType="System.Boolean" Output="true" />
        </ParameterGroup>
        <Task>
          <!--<Reference Include="" />-->
          <Using Namespace="System"/>
          <Using Namespace="System.IO"/>
          <Using Namespace="System.Text.RegularExpressions" />
          <Code Type="Fragment" Language="cs">
            <![CDATA[
            var values = Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("PATH");
            foreach (var path in values.Split(';')) {
                var exeFullPath = Path.Combine(path, "git.exe");
                if (File.Exists(exeFullPath)) {
                    Exists = true;
                    return true;
                }
                var cmdFullPath = Path.Combine(path, "git.cmd");
                if (File.Exists(cmdFullPath)) {
                    Exists = true;
                    return true;
            }
            }
            Exists = false;
            ]]>
          </Code>
        </Task>
      </UsingTask>

      <Target Name="CreateCommonVersionInfo" BeforeTargets="CoreCompile">
        <Message Importance="high" Text="CreateCommonVersionInfo" />

        <GitExistsInPath>
          <Output TaskParameter="Exists" PropertyName="GitExists"/>
        </GitExistsInPath>
        <Message Importance="High" Text="git not found!" Condition="!$(GitExists)"/>

        <Exec Command="git describe --tags --long --dirty > $(ProjectDir)version.txt" Outputs="$(ProjectDir)version.txt" WorkingDirectory="$(SolutionDir)" IgnoreExitCode="true" Condition="$(GitExists)">
          <Output TaskParameter="ExitCode" PropertyName="ExitCode" />
        </Exec>
        <Message Importance="high" Text="Calling git failed with exit code $(ExitCode)" Condition="$(GitExists) And '$(ExitCode)'!='0'" />

        <ReadLinesFromFile File="$(ProjectDir)version.txt" Condition="$(GitExists) And '$(ExitCode)'=='0'">
          <Output TaskParameter="Lines" ItemName="OutputLines"/>
        </ReadLinesFromFile>
        <Message Importance="High" Text="Tags: @(OutputLines)" Condition="$(GitExists) And '$(ExitCode)'=='0'"/>

        <Delete Condition="Exists('$(ProjectDir)version.txt')" Files="$(ProjectDir)version.txt"/>

        <GetVersion VersionString="@(OutputLines)" Condition="$(GitExists) And '$(ExitCode)'=='0'">
          <Output TaskParameter="Version" PropertyName="VersionString"/>
          <Output TaskParameter="Commit" PropertyName="Commit"/>
        </GetVersion>

        <PropertyGroup>
          <VersionString Condition="'$(VersionString)'==''">0.0.0.0</VersionString>
        </PropertyGroup>

        <Message Importance="High" Text="Creating CommonVersionInfo.cs with version $(VersionString) $(Commit)" />

        <WriteLinesToFile Overwrite="true" File="$(ProjectDir)CommonAssemblyInfo.cs" Encoding="UTF-8" Lines='using System.Reflection%3B

    // full version: $(VersionString)-$(Commit)

    [assembly: AssemblyVersion("$(VersionString)")]
    [assembly: AssemblyInformationalVersion("$(VersionString)")] 
    [assembly: AssemblyFileVersion("$(VersionString)")]' />

      </Target>
    </Project>

EDIT: If you are building using MSBUILD the

 $(SolutionDir)

Might cause you trouble, use

 $(ProjectDir)

instead

  • Very Cleaver, good job :) – Jason H Oct 6 '17 at 10:26
  • Nice! Does VersionSuffix end up getting set or used? It doesn't seem to be – Mark Adamson Oct 10 '17 at 20:04

The Automatic Versions extension for Visual Studio now supports .Net Core and .Net Standard autoincrementing in a simple user interface.

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=PrecisionInfinity.AutomaticVersions

  • 1
    I've done a quick test with demo solution (windows app) and it works, also with .net standard project. It was a quick test so have to dive in deeper to check if does all that we want. But you sure could try this one. – ArieKanarie Feb 28 at 11:12

You can use a MSBuild property function to set the version suffix based on current date:

<PropertyGroup Condition=" '$(Configuration)' == 'Debug' ">
  <VersionSuffix>pre$([System.DateTime]::UtcNow.ToString(yyyyMMdd-HHmm))</VersionSuffix>
</PropertyGroup>

This will output a package with a name like: PackageName.1.0.0-pre20180807-1711.nupkg.

More details about MSBuild property functions: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/visualstudio/msbuild/property-functions

I think this Answer from @joelsand is the correct answer for setting version number for dotnet core running on VSTS

To add more information for this answer,

BUILD_BUILDNUMBER is actually a predefined variable.

It turns out there are 2 versions of predefined variable.

One is build.xxxx, the other is BUILD_XXXX.

You can only use Environment Variable Name in cproj.

We can use special parameter for dotnet publish -- version-suffix 1.2.3

For file version:

<AssemblyVersion Condition=" '$(VersionSuffix)' == '' ">0.0.1.0</AssemblyVersion>
<AssemblyVersion Condition=" '$(VersionSuffix)' != '' ">$(VersionSuffix)</AssemblyVersion>

For version:

<Version Condition=" '$(VersionSuffix)' == '' ">0.0.1</Version>
<Version Condition=" '$(VersionSuffix)' != '' ">$(VersionSuffix)</Version>

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/core/tools/dotnet-publish?tabs=netcore21

--version-suffix <VERSION_SUFFIX>     Defines the value for the $(VersionSuffix) property in the project.

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