1173

Is there some rare language construct I haven't encountered (like the few I've learned recently, some on Stack Overflow) in C# to get a value representing the current iteration of a foreach loop?

For instance, I currently do something like this depending on the circumstances:

int i = 0;
foreach (Object o in collection)
{
    // ...
    i++;
}
8
  • 2
    foreach casting retrieval is generally not going to me more optimized than just using index-based access on a collection, though in many cases it will be equal. The purpose of foreach is to make your code readable, but it (usually) adds a layer of indirection, which isn't free.
    – Brian
    Mar 26, 2010 at 15:32
  • 13
    I would say the primary purpose of foreach is to provide a common iteration mechanism for all collections regardless of whether they are indexable (List) or not (Dictionary). Jul 23, 2010 at 15:59
  • 2
    Hi Brian Gideon - definitely agree (this was a few years ago and I was far less experienced at the time). However, while Dictionary isn't indexable, an iteration of Dictionary does traverse it in a particular order (i.e. an Enumerator is indexable by the fact it yields elements sequentially). In this sense, we could say that we are not looking for the index within the collection, but rather the index of the current enumerated element within the enumeration (i.e. whether we are at the first or fifth or last enumerated element). May 3, 2011 at 2:28
  • 7
    foreach also allows the compiler to skip bounds checking each array access in the compiled code. Using for with an index will make the runtime check whether your index access is safe.
    – IvoTops
    Aug 22, 2012 at 9:00
  • 1
    But it's false. If you don't change the iteration variable of a for loop within the loop, the compiler knows what its bounds are and doesn't need to check them again. This is such a common case that any decent compiler will implement it.
    – Jim Balter
    Oct 26, 2013 at 0:52

35 Answers 35

859

Ian Mercer posted a similar solution as this on Phil Haack's blog:

foreach (var item in Model.Select((value, i) => new { i, value }))
{
    var value = item.value;
    var index = item.i;
}

This gets you the item (item.value) and its index (item.i) by using this overload of LINQ's Select:

the second parameter of the function [inside Select] represents the index of the source element.

The new { i, value } is creating a new anonymous object.

Heap allocations can be avoided by using ValueTuple if you're using C# 7.0 or later:

foreach (var item in Model.Select((value, i) => ( value, i )))
{
    var value = item.value;
    var index = item.i;
}

You can also eliminate the item. by using automatic destructuring:

foreach (var (value, i) in Model.Select((value, i) => ( value, i )))
{
    // Access `value` and `i` directly here.
}
9
  • 13
    That solution is nice for the case of a Razor template where the neatness of the template is a non-trivial design concern and you are also wanting to use the index of every item that is enumerated. However, do bear in mind that the object allocation from 'wrapping' adds expense (in space and time) on top of the (unavoidable) incrementing of an integer. Feb 25, 2014 at 11:14
  • 6
    @mjsr The documentation is here. Sep 15, 2015 at 12:52
  • 45
    Sorry - that's clever, but is it really more readable than creating an index outside the foreach and incrementing it each loop?
    – jbyrd
    Oct 17, 2017 at 20:13
  • 19
    With the later C# versions so you also use tuples, so you'll have something like this: foreach (var (item, i) in Model.Select((v, i) => (v, i))) Allows you to access the item and index (i) directly inside the for-loop with tuple deconstruction.
    – Haukman
    Jan 8, 2018 at 22:25
  • 11
    Can someone explain to me why this is a good answer (over 450 upvotes at the time of writing)? As far as I can see it's more difficult to understand than simply incrementing a counter, is hence less maintainable, it uses more memory, and it is probably slower. Am I missing something?
    – Rich N
    Oct 9, 2018 at 17:24
628

The foreach is for iterating over collections that implement IEnumerable. It does this by calling GetEnumerator on the collection, which will return an Enumerator.

This Enumerator has a method and a property:

  • MoveNext()
  • Current

Current returns the object that Enumerator is currently on, MoveNext updates Current to the next object.

The concept of an index is foreign to the concept of enumeration, and cannot be done.

Because of that, most collections are able to be traversed using an indexer and the for loop construct.

I greatly prefer using a for loop in this situation compared to tracking the index with a local variable.

12
  • 216
    "Obviously, the concept of an index is foreign to the concept of enumeration, and cannot be done." -- This is nonsense, as the answers by David B and bcahill make clear. An index is an enumeration over a range, and there's no reason one cannot enumerate two things in parallel ... that's exactly what the indexing form of Enumerable.Select does.
    – Jim Balter
    Oct 26, 2013 at 0:57
  • 13
    Basic code example: for(var i = 0; i < myList.Count; i ++){System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(i);} Apr 14, 2015 at 17:53
  • 7
    @Pretzel The statement which I quoted is (obviously) not correct, and I explained why. The fact Linked List "doesn't have an index" is completely irrelevant and shows extraordinary confusion.
    – Jim Balter
    Feb 2, 2016 at 0:34
  • 4
    The bottom line is that "A Linked List is an example of an IEnumerable that doesn't have an index" is a strawman that is completely irrelevant. No one ever claimed that all IEnumerables "have an index".
    – Jim Balter
    Feb 2, 2016 at 22:48
  • 9
    @Pretzel Jim's point is that as long as you can map the elements to a sequence of integers, you can index it. That the class itself does not store an index is beside the point. Additionally, that the linked list does have an order only strengthens Jim's position. All you need to do is number each element in order. Specifically, you can achieve this by incrementing a count while you iterate, or you could generate a list of integers with the same length and then zip them (as in Python's zip function).
    – jpmc26
    Sep 2, 2017 at 1:29
371

Finally C#7 has a decent syntax for getting an index inside of a foreach loop (i. e. tuples):

foreach (var (item, index) in collection.WithIndex())
{
    Debug.WriteLine($"{index}: {item}");
}

A little extension method would be needed:

using System.Collections.Generic;

public static class EnumExtension {
    public static IEnumerable<(T item, int index)> WithIndex<T>(this IEnumerable<T> self)       
       => self.Select((item, index) => (item, index));
}
7
  • 26
    This answer is underrated, having the tuples is much cleaner Sep 20, 2017 at 1:15
  • 27
    Modified to handle null collections: public static IEnumerable<(T item, int index)> WithIndex<T>(this IEnumerable<T> self) => self?.Select((item, index) => (item, index)) ?? new List<(T, int)>();
    – 2Toad
    Nov 25, 2018 at 5:33
  • 1
    Nice one. I really like this solution the most. Sep 25, 2019 at 9:12
  • 6
    It might be useful to call the method Enumerated to be more recognizable for people used to other languages (and perhaps swap the order of the tuple parameters too). Not that WithIndex isn't obvious anyway.
    – FernAndr
    Jan 30, 2020 at 9:33
  • 3
    @2Toad For the null condition you could also use Enumerable.Empty<(T, int)>() as more efficient than creating an empty list, I think.
    – Dan Diplo
    Oct 19, 2020 at 8:58
125

Could do something like this:

public static class ForEachExtensions
{
    public static void ForEachWithIndex<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable, Action<T, int> handler)
    {
        int idx = 0;
        foreach (T item in enumerable)
            handler(item, idx++);
    }
}

public class Example
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        string[] values = new[] { "foo", "bar", "baz" };

        values.ForEachWithIndex((item, idx) => Console.WriteLine("{0}: {1}", idx, item));
    }
}
3
  • 14
    That doesn't "really" solve the problem. The idea is good but it doesn't avoid the additional counting variable Dec 31, 2009 at 11:52
  • This does not work if we have a return statement within our for loop, if you change "ForEachWithIndex" for that, then it is not generic, better off writing a regular for loop Aug 15, 2012 at 16:39
  • 1
    Your ForEachWithIndex call is equivalent to this one using the Linq Select that takes a string and an index: values.Select((item, idx) => { Console.WriteLine("{0}: {1}", idx, item); return item; }).ToList(); Jan 28, 2016 at 14:07
109

I disagree with comments that a for loop is a better choice in most cases.

foreach is a useful construct, and not replaceble by a for loop in all circumstances.

For example, if you have a DataReader and loop through all records using a foreach it automatically calls the Dispose method and closes the reader (which can then close the connection automatically). This is therefore safer as it prevents connection leaks even if you forget to close the reader.

(Sure it is good practise to always close readers but the compiler is not going to catch it if you don't - you can't guarantee you have closed all readers but you can make it more likely you won't leak connections by getting in the habit of using foreach.)

There may be other examples of the implicit call of the Dispose method being useful.

2
68

Literal Answer -- warning, performance may not be as good as just using an int to track the index. At least it is better than using IndexOf.

You just need to use the indexing overload of Select to wrap each item in the collection with an anonymous object that knows the index. This can be done against anything that implements IEnumerable.

System.Collections.IEnumerable collection = Enumerable.Range(100, 10);

foreach (var o in collection.OfType<object>().Select((x, i) => new {x, i}))
{
    Console.WriteLine("{0} {1}", o.i, o.x);
}
5
  • 3
    The only reason to use OfType<T>() instead of Cast<T>() is if some items in the enumeration might fail an explicit cast. For object, this will never be the case.
    – dahlbyk
    Jun 26, 2009 at 0:09
  • 15
    Sure, except for the other reason to use OfType instead of Cast - which is that I never use Cast.
    – Amy B
    Jun 26, 2009 at 2:02
  • 1
    Why was the OfType() (or Cast, if preferred) needed at all? Select can be called right on collection, no? Dec 2, 2020 at 17:36
  • 1
    @UuDdLrLrSs No. Select requires a type parameter. non-generic IEnumerable has no type parameter to supply.
    – Amy B
    Dec 2, 2020 at 23:28
  • 1
    @AmyB thanks! I overlooked that collection was IEnumerable only. Dec 2, 2020 at 23:29
49

Using LINQ, C# 7, and the System.ValueTuple NuGet package, you can do this:

foreach (var (value, index) in collection.Select((v, i)=>(v, i))) {
    Console.WriteLine(value + " is at index " + index);
}

You can use the regular foreach construct and be able to access the value and index directly, not as a member of an object, and keeps both fields only in the scope of the loop. For these reasons, I believe this is the best solution if you are able to use C# 7 and System.ValueTuple.

3
  • How is this different from user1414213562's answer? Apr 8, 2019 at 13:36
  • @EdwardBrey I suppose it isn't. This question has a lot of answers, I probably just missed it or didn't notice what it was doing because he separated some of the logic out into an extension method.
    – Pavel
    Apr 8, 2019 at 16:12
  • 2
    This is different because .Select is built-in from LINQ. You don't have to write your own function? You will need to have VS install "System.ValueTuple" though.
    – Anton
    Dec 17, 2019 at 19:13
41

There's nothing wrong with using a counter variable. In fact, whether you use for, foreach while or do, a counter variable must somewhere be declared and incremented.

So use this idiom if you're not sure if you have a suitably-indexed collection:

var i = 0;
foreach (var e in collection) {
   // Do stuff with 'e' and 'i'
   i++;
}

Else use this one if you know that your indexable collection is O(1) for index access (which it will be for Array and probably for List<T> (the documentation doesn't say), but not necessarily for other types (such as LinkedList)):

// Hope the JIT compiler optimises read of the 'Count' property!
for (var i = 0; i < collection.Count; i++) {
   var e = collection[i];
   // Do stuff with 'e' and 'i'
}

It should never be necessary to 'manually' operate the IEnumerator by invoking MoveNext() and interrogating Current - foreach is saving you that particular bother ... if you need to skip items, just use a continue in the body of the loop.

And just for completeness, depending on what you were doing with your index (the above constructs offer plenty of flexibility), you might use Parallel LINQ:

// First, filter 'e' based on 'i',
// then apply an action to remaining 'e'
collection
    .AsParallel()
    .Where((e,i) => /* filter with e,i */)
    .ForAll(e => { /* use e, but don't modify it */ });

// Using 'e' and 'i', produce a new collection,
// where each element incorporates 'i'
collection
    .AsParallel()
    .Select((e, i) => new MyWrapper(e, i));

We use AsParallel() above, because it's 2014 already, and we want to make good use of those multiple cores to speed things up. Further, for 'sequential' LINQ, you only get a ForEach() extension method on List<T> and Array ... and it's not clear that using it is any better than doing a simple foreach, since you are still running single-threaded for uglier syntax.

1
  • In my view, this is the best answer in terms of weighing readability and ensuring there is bounds safety
    – Dean P
    May 1, 2021 at 14:01
37

Using @FlySwat's answer, I came up with this solution:

//var list = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 }; // Your sample collection

var listEnumerator = list.GetEnumerator(); // Get enumerator

for (var i = 0; listEnumerator.MoveNext() == true; i++)
{
  int currentItem = listEnumerator.Current; // Get current item.
  //Console.WriteLine("At index {0}, item is {1}", i, currentItem); // Do as you wish with i and  currentItem
}

You get the enumerator using GetEnumerator and then you loop using a for loop. However, the trick is to make the loop's condition listEnumerator.MoveNext() == true.

Since the MoveNext method of an enumerator returns true if there is a next element and it can be accessed, making that the loop condition makes the loop stop when we run out of elements to iterate over.

7
  • 14
    There's no need to compare listEnumerator.MoveNext() == true. That's like asking the computer if true == true? :) Just say if listEnumerator.MoveNext() { }
    – Zesty
    Nov 7, 2013 at 8:12
  • 11
    @Zesty, you're absolutely correct. I felt that it's more readable to add it in this case especially for people who aren't used to entering anything other than i < blahSize as a condition.
    – Gezim
    Nov 7, 2013 at 17:36
  • 2
    You should dispose the enumerator. Dec 16, 2017 at 21:02
  • 1
    @EdwardBrey you are right, it is a good point. But speaking about the listEnumerator here, it is a generic enumerator and as such it does implement IDisposable and should be disposed. Apr 9, 2019 at 2:56
  • 1
    @AntonínLejsek Good catch for List<T>'s enumerator. It implements System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerator<T>, which inherits IDisposable. The enumerator for List<T> doesn't do anything in Dispose and doesn't have a finalizer, so calling Dispose in this case has no effect, but it could for other enumerables. Apr 9, 2019 at 11:24
25

You could wrap the original enumerator with another that does contain the index information.

foreach (var item in ForEachHelper.WithIndex(collection))
{
    Console.Write("Index=" + item.Index);
    Console.Write(";Value= " + item.Value);
    Console.Write(";IsLast=" + item.IsLast);
    Console.WriteLine();
}

Here is the code for the ForEachHelper class.

public static class ForEachHelper
{
    public sealed class Item<T>
    {
        public int Index { get; set; }
        public T Value { get; set; }
        public bool IsLast { get; set; }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<Item<T>> WithIndex<T>(IEnumerable<T> enumerable)
    {
        Item<T> item = null;
        foreach (T value in enumerable)
        {
            Item<T> next = new Item<T>();
            next.Index = 0;
            next.Value = value;
            next.IsLast = false;
            if (item != null)
            {
                next.Index = item.Index + 1;
                yield return item;
            }
            item = next;
        }
        if (item != null)
        {
            item.IsLast = true;
            yield return item;
        }            
    }
}
2
  • This won't actually return the index of the item. Instead, it will return the index inside the enumerated list, which may only be a sublist of the list, thereby giving you accurate data only when the sublist and the list are of equal size. Basically, any time the collection has objects in it not in the requested type your index will be incorrect.
    – Lucas B
    Jul 23, 2010 at 13:11
  • 7
    @Lucas: No, but it will return the index of the current foreach iteration. That was the question. Jul 23, 2010 at 13:32
24

Just add your own index. Keep it simple.

int i = 0;
foreach (var item in Collection)
{
    item.index = i;
    ++i;
}
22

Why foreach ?!

The simplest way is using for instead of foreach if you are using List:

for (int i = 0 ; i < myList.Count ; i++)
{
    // Do something...
}

Or if you want use foreach:

foreach (string m in myList)
{
     // Do something...
}

You can use this to know the index of each loop:

myList.indexOf(m)
3
  • 18
    indexOf solution is invalid for list with duplicates and is also very slow.
    – tymtam
    Nov 17, 2016 at 0:03
  • 2
    The issue to be avoided is where you traverse the IEnumerable multiple times, e.g. to get the count of items and then each item. This has implications when the IEnumerable is the result of a database query for example. Jan 12, 2018 at 1:18
  • 3
    myList.IndexOf() is O(n), so your loop will be O(n^2). Nov 8, 2019 at 18:06
21

Here's a solution I just came up with for this problem

Original code:

int index=0;
foreach (var item in enumerable)
{
    blah(item, index); // some code that depends on the index
    index++;
}

Updated code

enumerable.ForEach((item, index) => blah(item, index));

Extension Method:

    public static IEnumerable<T> ForEach<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable, Action<T, int> action)
    {
        var unit = new Unit(); // unit is a new type from the reactive framework (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/devlabs/ee794896.aspx) to represent a void, since in C# you can't return a void
        enumerable.Select((item, i) => 
            {
                action(item, i);
                return unit;
            }).ToList();

        return pSource;
    }
19

It's only going to work for a List and not any IEnumerable, but in LINQ there's this:

IList<Object> collection = new List<Object> { 
    new Object(), 
    new Object(), 
    new Object(), 
    };

foreach (Object o in collection)
{
    Console.WriteLine(collection.IndexOf(o));
}

Console.ReadLine();

@Jonathan I didn't say it was a great answer, I just said it was just showing it was possible to do what he asked :)

@Graphain I wouldn't expect it to be fast - I'm not entirely sure how it works, it could reiterate through the entire list each time to find a matching object, which would be a helluvalot of compares.

That said, List might keep an index of each object along with the count.

Jonathan seems to have a better idea, if he would elaborate?

It would be better to just keep a count of where you're up to in the foreach though, simpler, and more adaptable.

2
  • 6
    Not sure on the heavy downvoting. Sure performance makes this prohibitive but you did answer the question! Oct 2, 2009 at 21:15
  • 4
    Another issue with this is that it only works if the items in the list are unique. Sep 14, 2011 at 19:12
19

C# 7 finally gives us an elegant way to do this:

static class Extensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<(int, T)> Enumerate<T>(
        this IEnumerable<T> input,
        int start = 0
    )
    {
        int i = start;
        foreach (var t in input)
        {
            yield return (i++, t);
        }
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var s = new string[]
        {
            "Alpha",
            "Bravo",
            "Charlie",
            "Delta"
        };

        foreach (var (i, t) in s.Enumerate())
        {
            Console.WriteLine($"{i}: {t}");
        }
    }
}
1
  • 1
    Yes, and MS should extend the CLR/BCL to make this kind of thing native. Apr 18, 2019 at 4:58
16

This answer: lobby the C# language team for direct language support.

The leading answer states:

Obviously, the concept of an index is foreign to the concept of enumeration, and cannot be done.

While this is true of the current C# language version (2020), this is not a conceptual CLR/Language limit, it can be done.

The Microsoft C# language development team could create a new C# language feature, by adding support for a new Interface IIndexedEnumerable

foreach (var item in collection with var index)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Iteration {0} has value {1}", index, item);
}

//or, building on @user1414213562's answer
foreach (var (item, index) in collection)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Iteration {0} has value {1}", index, item);
}

If foreach () is used and with var index is present, then the compiler expects the item collection to declare IIndexedEnumerable interface. If the interface is absent, the compiler can polyfill wrap the source with an IndexedEnumerable object, which adds in the code for tracking the index.

interface IIndexedEnumerable<T> : IEnumerable<T>
{
    //Not index, because sometimes source IEnumerables are transient
    public long IterationNumber { get; }
}

Later, the CLR can be updated to have internal index tracking, that is only used if with keyword is specified and the source doesn't directly implement IIndexedEnumerable

Why:

  • Foreach looks nicer, and in business applications, foreach loops are rarely a performance bottleneck
  • Foreach can be more efficient on memory. Having a pipeline of functions instead of converting to new collections at each step. Who cares if it uses a few more CPU cycles when there are fewer CPU cache faults and fewer garbage collections?
  • Requiring the coder to add index-tracking code, spoils the beauty
  • It's quite easy to implement (please Microsoft) and is backward compatible

While most people here are not Microsoft employees, this is a correct answer, you can lobby Microsoft to add such a feature. You could already build your own iterator with an extension function and use tuples, but Microsoft could sprinkle the syntactic sugar to avoid the extension function

2
  • Wait, so does this language feature already exist, or is it proposed for the future?
    – Pavel
    Sep 18, 2017 at 15:22
  • 1
    @Pavel I updated the answer to be clear. This answer was provided to counter the leading answer which states "Obviously, the concept of an index is foreign to the concept of enumeration, and cannot be done." Sep 20, 2017 at 1:08
10

This is how I do it, which is nice for its simplicity/brevity, but if you're doing a lot in the loop body obj.Value, it is going to get old pretty fast.

foreach(var obj in collection.Select((item, index) => new { Index = index, Value = item }) {
    string foo = string.Format("Something[{0}] = {1}", obj.Index, obj.Value);
    ...
}
8
int index;
foreach (Object o in collection)
{
    index = collection.indexOf(o);
}

This would work for collections supporting IList.

6
  • 72
    Two problems: 1) This is O(n^2) since in most implementations IndexOf is O(n). 2) This fails if there are duplicate items in the list. Sep 14, 2011 at 19:08
  • 17
    Note: O(n^2) means this could be disastrously slow for a big collection.
    – O'Rooney
    Nov 14, 2011 at 0:58
  • Great invention to use IndexOf method! This is what I was looking for to get the index (number) in foreach loop! Big Thx Feb 27, 2013 at 9:50
  • 21
    God, I hope you did not use that! :( It DOES use that variable you did't want to create - in fact, it will create n+1 ints because that function has to create one in order to return, too, - and that indexof search is much, much slower than one integer increment operation in every step. Why won't people vote this answer down?
    – canahari
    May 19, 2013 at 22:42
  • 14
    Don't use this answer, I found the hard truth mentioned in one of the comments. "This fails if there are duplicate items in the list."!!!
    – Bruce
    May 23, 2014 at 7:32
7
//using foreach loop how to get index number:
    
foreach (var result in results.Select((value, index) => new { index, value }))
    {
     //do something
    }
2
  • 6
    While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding how and/or why it solves the problem would improve the answer's long-term value. Jul 17, 2020 at 12:17
  • 3
    This is just a repeat of this existing answer.
    – Pang
    Mar 29, 2021 at 7:44
6

Better to use keyword continue safe construction like this

int i=-1;
foreach (Object o in collection)
{
    ++i;
    //...
    continue; //<--- safe to call, index will be increased
    //...
}
5

You can write your loop like this:

var s = "ABCDEFG";
foreach (var item in s.GetEnumeratorWithIndex())
{
    System.Console.WriteLine("Character: {0}, Position: {1}", item.Value, item.Index);
}

After adding the following struct and extension method.

The struct and extension method encapsulate Enumerable.Select functionality.

public struct ValueWithIndex<T>
{
    public readonly T Value;
    public readonly int Index;

    public ValueWithIndex(T value, int index)
    {
        this.Value = value;
        this.Index = index;
    }

    public static ValueWithIndex<T> Create(T value, int index)
    {
        return new ValueWithIndex<T>(value, index);
    }
}

public static class ExtensionMethods
{
    public static IEnumerable<ValueWithIndex<T>> GetEnumeratorWithIndex<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable)
    {
        return enumerable.Select(ValueWithIndex<T>.Create);
    }
}
3

My solution for this problem is an extension method WithIndex(),

http://code.google.com/p/ub-dotnet-utilities/source/browse/trunk/Src/Utilities/Extensions/EnumerableExtensions.cs

Use it like

var list = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 };    

var odd = list.WithIndex().Where(i => (i.Item & 1) == 1);
CollectionAssert.AreEqual(new[] { 0, 2, 4 }, odd.Select(i => i.Index));
CollectionAssert.AreEqual(new[] { 1, 3, 5 }, odd.Select(i => i.Item));
1
  • I'd use a struct for the (index,item) pair. Sep 14, 2011 at 19:18
3

For interest, Phil Haack just wrote an example of this in the context of a Razor Templated Delegate (http://haacked.com/archive/2011/04/14/a-better-razor-foreach-loop.aspx)

Effectively he writes an extension method which wraps the iteration in an "IteratedItem" class (see below) allowing access to the index as well as the element during iteration.

public class IndexedItem<TModel> {
  public IndexedItem(int index, TModel item) {
    Index = index;
    Item = item;
  }

  public int Index { get; private set; }
  public TModel Item { get; private set; }
}

However, while this would be fine in a non-Razor environment if you are doing a single operation (i.e. one that could be provided as a lambda) it's not going to be a solid replacement of the for/foreach syntax in non-Razor contexts.

3

I don't think this should be quite efficient, but it works:

@foreach (var banner in Model.MainBanners) {
    @Model.MainBanners.IndexOf(banner)
}
0
3

I built this in LINQPad:

var listOfNames = new List<string>(){"John","Steve","Anna","Chris"};

var listCount = listOfNames.Count;

var NamesWithCommas = string.Empty;

foreach (var element in listOfNames)
{
    NamesWithCommas += element;
    if(listOfNames.IndexOf(element) != listCount -1)
    {
        NamesWithCommas += ", ";
    }
}

NamesWithCommas.Dump();  //LINQPad method to write to console.

You could also just use string.join:

var joinResult = string.Join(",", listOfNames);
2
  • 1
    Can someone explain to me what's this O(n*n) thing ?
    – Axel
    Jan 9, 2017 at 21:59
  • @Axel it basically means that the operations required to calculate the result increase quadratically, i.e. if there are n items then the operations are n * n, or n-squared. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… Sep 11, 2018 at 14:09
2

I don't believe there is a way to get the value of the current iteration of a foreach loop. Counting yourself, seems to be the best way.

May I ask, why you would want to know?

It seems that you would most likley be doing one of three things:

1) Getting the object from the collection, but in this case you already have it.

2) Counting the objects for later post processing...the collections have a Count property that you could make use of.

3) Setting a property on the object based on its order in the loop...although you could easily be setting that when you added the object to the collection.

1
  • 4) The case I've hit several times is something different that has to be done on the first or last pass--say a list of objects you are going to print and you need commas between items but not after the last item. Aug 20, 2010 at 23:01
2

Unless your collection can return the index of the object via some method, the only way is to use a counter like in your example.

However, when working with indexes, the only reasonable answer to the problem is to use a for loop. Anything else introduces code complexity, not to mention time and space complexity.

2

I just had this problem, but thinking around the problem in my case gave the best solution, unrelated to the expected solution.

It could be quite a common case, basically, I'm reading from one source list and creating objects based on them in a destination list, however, I have to check whether the source items are valid first and want to return the row of any error. At first-glance, I want to get the index into the enumerator of the object at the Current property, however, as I am copying these elements, I implicitly know the current index anyway from the current destination. Obviously it depends on your destination object, but for me it was a List, and most likely it will implement ICollection.

i.e.

var destinationList = new List<someObject>();
foreach (var item in itemList)
{
  var stringArray = item.Split(new char[] { ';', ',' }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);

  if (stringArray.Length != 2)
  {
    //use the destinationList Count property to give us the index into the stringArray list
    throw new Exception("Item at row " + (destinationList.Count + 1) + " has a problem.");
  }
  else
  {
    destinationList.Add(new someObject() { Prop1 = stringArray[0], Prop2 = stringArray[1]});
  }
}

Not always applicable, but often enough to be worth mentioning, I think.

Anyway, the point being that sometimes there is a non-obvious solution already in the logic you have...

2

I wasn't sure what you were trying to do with the index information based on the question. However, in C#, you can usually adapt the IEnumerable.Select method to get the index out of whatever you want. For instance, I might use something like this for whether a value is odd or even.

string[] names = { "one", "two", "three" };
var oddOrEvenByName = names
    .Select((name, index) => new KeyValuePair<string, int>(name, index % 2))
    .ToDictionary(kvp => kvp.Key, kvp => kvp.Value);

This would give you a dictionary by name of whether the item was odd (1) or even (0) in the list.

2

If the collection is a list, you can use List.IndexOf, as in:

foreach (Object o in collection)
{
    // ...
    @collection.IndexOf(o)
}
3
  • 16
    And now the algorithm is O(n^2) (if not worse). I would think very carefully before using this. Its also a duplicate of @crucible 's answer Jan 5, 2015 at 18:26
  • 1
    @BradleyDotNET is exactly right, don't use this version.
    – Oskar
    Jan 15, 2016 at 11:16
  • 2
    Be careful with this! If you've got a duplicated item in your list, it will get the position of the first one!
    – Sonhja
    Jul 15, 2016 at 9:00

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