1

This question already has an answer here:

Does the class below implement the singleton pattern? I'm really confused.

class Customer {

    static private Map costumers = new HashMap();

    private Customer() {
    }

    public static Customer getInstance(String name) {
        Customer instance = (Customer) costumers.get(name);
        if (instance == null) {
            instance = new Customer();
            costumers.put(name, instance);
        }
        return instance;

    }
}

Thanks.

marked as duplicate by Nicolas Filotto java Nov 10 '18 at 18:23

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

13

No, it doesn't. Thread-safety and type-safety issues aside, I can very easily get two different instances of Customer:

Customer x = Customer.getInstance("first");
Customer y = Customer.getInstance("second");
System.out.println(x == y); // false

Therefore it's not a singleton. It's a sort of factory/flyweight pattern hybrid, but it's certainly not the singleton pattern.

  • 3
    Nothing personal, but I think the amount of upvotes on this testifies to the Jon Skeet effect. – shmosel Mar 26 '17 at 9:00
1

Its not. In the given example, a new Customer instance is created for each different Customer name. Which should not happen in case of singleton. There sould be only one Customer instance created and shared for all the customer names. The Customer instance needs to be private static and it shoud be created and assigned only once.

1
public class SingltonPattern {

private static SingltonPattern instance = null;

protected SingltonPattern() {}

public static SingltonPattern getInstance() {
        if (instance == null) {
                // Thread Safe - Second layer
                synchronized (SingltonPattern.class) {
                        if (instance == null) {
                                instance = new SingltonPattern();
                        }
                }
        }
        return instance;
}

Here is a pattern for Singlton DP.

  • There's rarely a need for double-checked locking though - there are simpler ways of implementing a thread-safe singleton in Java. This also doesn't address the OP's code at all. – Jon Skeet Mar 26 '17 at 9:04
  • @JonSkeet There's rarely a need for double-checked locking though - totally disagree (we can discuss it but it is off-topic here). there are simpler ways of implementing a thread-safe singleton in Java - correct just gave one example. This also doesn't address the OP's code at all - I Just gave an abstract example so OP can figure up what is wrong with his. – ReDevil Mar 26 '17 at 10:51
  • 1
    Simpler ways of implementing: single-element enum, or just initialize the instance variable directly. It's very rare that you need this more complicated and error-prone pattern. (Even if you want laziness with the ability to call other static methods without initializing, a nested class is a simpler approach.) And if you're not addressing the OP's question, it doesn't belong as an answer to the question, IMO. – Jon Skeet Mar 26 '17 at 11:28
  • 1
    Actually, having seen you've got a protected constructor, this isn't even a valid implementation of the singleton pattern... – Jon Skeet Mar 26 '17 at 11:51
0

Singleton design pattern is one of the simplest design pattern which ensures that only one object of a class can be created and it provides a global point of access to that instance.

It comes under creational design pattern as it provides one of the best ways to create an object.

This is useful when we need to have only one instance of our class for example a single DB connection shared by multiple objects as creating a separate DB connection for every object may be costly. Similarly, there can be a single configuration manager or error manager in an application that handles all problems instead of creating multiple managers.

class Singleton
{
    private static Singleton instance;

    // private constructor to restrict the instantiation of Singleton Class
    private Singleton() {

    }

    //GetInstance method to provide global access to Singleton instance
    public static Singleton getInstance()
    {
        if (instance==null)
            instance = new Singleton();
        return instance;
    }
}

Refer the post for more details

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