8

The code I have been working on requires that I print a variable of type uint32_t in hexadecimal, with a padding of 0s and minimum length 8. The code I have been using to do this so far is:

printf("%08lx\n",read_word(address));

Where read_word returns type uint32_t. I have used jx, llx, etc. formats to no avail, is there a correct format that can be used?

EDIT:

I have found the problem lies in what I am passing. The function read_word is returns a value from a uint32_t vector. It seems that this is the problem that is causing problems with out putting hex. Is this a passing by reference/value issue and what is the fix?

read_word function:

uint32_t memory::read_word (uint32_t address) {
  if(address>(maxWord)){
        return 0;
    }

    return mem[address];

}

mem deceleration:

std::vector<uint32_t> mem=decltype(mem)(1024,0);
10
  • 1
    This <stdint.h> header file reference should be helpful. Check the format macros at the end. – Some programmer dude Mar 26 '17 at 12:46
  • @Someprogrammerdude Thanks, I'll look at the documentation and see If I can get it to work, not sure how to get PRIx32 working with padding – Dave Mar 26 '17 at 12:58
  • It just specifices the type. No difference. – Karoly Horvath Mar 26 '17 at 12:59
  • @KarolyHorvath I'm using printf("%08PRIx32\n",read_word(address)); and receiving %08PRIx32 as output. – Dave Mar 26 '17 at 13:06
  • The macros that start with PRI cannot be inside the format string. Look at WhozCraig's answer closely. – Adrian McCarthy Mar 26 '17 at 16:22
9

To do this in C++ you need to abuse both the fill and the width manipulators:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <cstdint>

int main()
{
    uint32_t myInt = 123456;
    std::cout << std::setfill('0') << std::setw(8) << std::hex << myInt << '\n';
}

Output

0001e240

For C it gets a little more obtuse. You use inttypes.h

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <inttypes.h>


int main()
{
    uint32_t myInt = 123456;
    printf("%08" PRIx32 "\n", myInt);
    return 0;
}

Output

0001e240

Note that in C, the constants from inttypes.h are used with the language string-concatenation feature to form the required format specifier. You only provide the zero-fill and minimum length as a preamble.

4
  • 1
    For me printf("%08x\n", value); works fine where uint32_t value = 0xabcd;, stdio.h and stdint.h included only. – Bence Kaulics Mar 26 '17 at 13:16
  • We seem to be onto something with the formatting from the C++ version, however the output is still coming out in decimal. E.g. when read_word returns a value of 10 (type uint32_t) and is used in the C++ method it will print 00000010; unfortunately not 0000000a. If I set a constant in the cout in place of myInt it works, so perhaps it is a problem with the return? – Dave Mar 26 '17 at 13:21
  • 1
    A much less ugly solution that works for arbitrary types you don't have macros for is printf("%08jx", (uintmax_t)value); – R.. GitHub STOP HELPING ICE Mar 26 '17 at 15:39
  • @R Seems like a good solution, as per my edit in the OP there seems to be another underlying error, would you happen to know why this is caused? – Dave Mar 26 '17 at 15:54
2

%jx + typecast

I think this is correct:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>

int main(void) {
    uint32_t i = 0x123456;
    printf("%08jx\n", (uintmax_t)i);
    return 0;
}

compile and run:

gcc -Wall -Wextra -pedantic -std=c99 main.c
./a.out

Output:

00123456

Let me know if you can produce a failing test case.

Tested in Ubuntu 16.04, GCC 6.4.0.

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