3

I just started playing around Jasmine and I'm still struggling on the spyon/mocking things, e.g., I have a function

module.exports = (() => {
    ....

    function getUserInfo(id) {
        return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
            redis.getAsync(id).then(result => {
                resolve(result)
            })
        }) 
    }
    return { getUserInfo: getUserInfo }
})()

Then I start writing the Jasmine spec

describe('Test user helper', () => {
    let userInfo

    beforeEach(done => {
        userHelper.getUserInfo('userid123')
            .then(info => {
                userInfo = info
                done() 
            })
    })

    it('return user info if user is found', () => {
        expect(userInfo).toEqual('info of userid 123')
    })
})

It runs well, but my question is how can I mock the redis.getAsync call, so it can become a real isolated unit test?

Thanks.

7
  • it is dependent test case. first you have to run a test case that will insert some data to redis . Then you have to run this test case
    – AJS
    Mar 27 '17 at 5:20
  • @AJS then it will not be a unit test. Mar 27 '17 at 5:21
  • He wants to mock redis which is the correct way approach Mar 27 '17 at 5:22
  • 1
    @Aluan Haddad System tests cover the whole system from end-to-end.Unit tests can be used to describe a sub-segment of the end-to-end cycle.In that case your unit tests of your application code would/might not hit the database, but you would/might have unit tests that covered your database stored procedures.Basically divide your application into things to be tested along partitions that make sense. If you choose the wrong partition line you end up with a big code maintenance problem with mock objects and test scaffolding and stuff.
    – AJS
    Mar 27 '17 at 5:34
  • 1
    @AJS right, different kinds of tests for different things. Mocks are for unit tests and a primary use case for mocking is to avoid hitting the database. I agree with all of your points regarding the need to test the interaction between components in additional to individual components, but my answer below describes what I think is a solid way to make this function testable, and test it, while preserving the api. Mar 27 '17 at 5:49
5

Good question. You can mock out the redis dependency but only if you rewrite you code, slightly, to be more testable. Here, that means making redis a parameter to the factory that returns the object containing getUserInfo.

Of course, this changes the API, callers now need to call the export to get the object. To fix this, we can create a wrapper module that calls the function with the standard redis object, and returns the result. Then we move the actual factory into an inner module, which still allows it to be tested.

Here is what that might well look like

user-helper/factory.js

module.exports = redis => {
  ....

  function getUserInfo(id) {
    return redis.getAsync(id); // note simplified as new Promise was not needed
  }
  return {getUserInfo};
};

user-helper/index.js

// this is the wrapper that preserves existing API
module.exports = require('./factory')(redis);

And now for the test

const userHelperFactory = require('./user-helper/factory');

function createMockRedis() {
  const users = [
    {userId: 'userid123'},
    // etc.
  ];
  return {
    getAsync: function (id) {
      // Note: I do not know off hand what redis returns, or if it throws,
      // if there is no matching record - adjust this to match.
      return Promise.resolve(users.find(user => user.userId === id));
    }
  };
}

describe('Test user helper', () => {
  const mockRedis = createMockRedis();
  const userHelper = userHelperFactory(mockRedis);

  let userInfo;

  beforeEach(async () => {
    userInfo = await userHelper.getUserInfo('userid123');
  });

  it('must return user info when a matching user exists', () => {
    expect(userInfo).toEqual('info of userid 123');
  });
});

NOTE: As discussed in comments, this was just my incidental approach to the situation at hand. There are plenty of other setups and conventions you can use but the primary idea was just based on the existing export of the result of an IIFE, which is a solid pattern, and I leveraged the NodeJS /index convention to preserve the existing API. You could also use one file and export via both module.exports = factory(redis) and module.exports.factory = factory, but that would, I believe, be less idiomatic in NodeJS. The broader point was that being able to mock for tests, and testability in general is just about parameterization.

Parameterization is wonderfully powerful, and its simplicity is why developers working in functional languages sometimes laugh at OOP programmers, such as yours truly, and our clandestine incantations like "Oh glorious Dependency Injection Container, bequeath unto me an instanceof X" :)

It is not that OOP or DI get it wrong it is that testability, DI, IOC, etc. are just about parameterization.

Interestingly, if we were loading redis as a module, and if we were using a configurable module loader, such as SystemJS, we could do this by simply using loader configuration at the test level. Even Webpack lets you do this to some extent, but for NodeJS you would need to monkey patch the Require Function, or create a bunch of fake packages, which are not good options.

To the OP's specific response

Thanks! That's a good idea, but practically, it seems it's quite strange when I have tons of file to test in which I will need to create a factory and index.js for each of them.

You would need to restructure your API surface and simply export factories that consuming code must call, rather than the result of applying those factories, to reduce the burden, but there are tradeoffs and default instances are helpful to consumers.

7
  • Thanks! That's a good idea, but practically, it seems it's quite strange when I have tons of file to test in which I will need to create a factory and index.js for each of them.
    – Rick Lee
    Mar 27 '17 at 9:14
  • 1
    That was just my incidental adaptation of your specific situation. There are plenty of other layouts you can use but the primary idea was just based on the export of the result of an IIFE, which is a solid pattern, and I used the NodeJS /index convention to deal with it. You could also use one file and both export to exports.userHelperFactory and module.exports. The broader point was that being able to mock for tests is just about parameterization, that it can be clean and simple :) Mar 27 '17 at 11:44
  • 1
    You could also just expose the factory only and require that the consuming code provide redis in general, which might be fine for an application level component, but if you are writing a library, you may want to keep the current simple API you expose. You could also simply call all of the factories at a higher level. Lots of stuff you can do here, but this approach doesn't require that you use a third party (or hand-rolled) DI abstraction. You don't need those, although they can be useful, in functional languages, and JavaScript is a functional language. Testability is just adding parameters Mar 27 '17 at 11:51
  • 1
    thanks for this very detail walk thru! I end up using the latter approach you mentioned, i.e., module.exports both the factory and default helper.
    – Rick Lee
    Mar 28 '17 at 3:28
  • 1
    @ggorlen thank you. I've updated the code accordingly. Jun 17 '20 at 19:31

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