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I am using structuremap.net as my container. I want to pass all dependencies of a class as a dependency object instead of one parameter per dependency.

// Dependencies of Controller
class Dependencies {
    public IUserDatabase UserDatabase { get; set; }
    public IProductDatabase ProductDatabase { get; set; }
    // more dependencies ...
}

class Controller {
    Dependencies _d;

    Controller(Dependencies dependencies){
        this._d = dependencies;
    }

    public ActionResult Action() {
        var user = _this._d.GetUserById(10);
        var product = _this._d.GetProductById(20);
        // ...
    }
}

How can I set all dependencies using setter injection (IUserDatabase, IProductDatabase etc.) automatically when building the instance of the class Dependencies via structuremap?

var container = new Container();
// How to configure this in a generic way?
var dependencies = container.GetInstance<Dependencies>();

EDIT

My first example doesn't seem to illustrate why I want setter injection for a complete object and why this is not a bad design choice.

We have a custom Web Framework which takes a lot of principles from ASP.NET MVC but also differs in a lot of ways. Like ASP.NET MVC we also have actions and controllers and group actions within controllers. Typical code looks like this:

class MyController {
    public IUserDatabase _userDatabase; 
    public IProductDatabase _productDatabase;
    public IRatingDatabase _ratingDatabase;
    public ICommentsDatabase _commentsDatabase; 

    MyController(IUserDatabase userDatabase, IUserDatabase productDatabase, IRatingDatabase ratingDatabase, ICommentsDatabase commentsDatabase){
        _userDatabase = userDatabase;
        _productDatabase = productDatabase;
        _ratingDatabase = ratingDatabase;
        _commentsDatabase = commentsDatabase;
    }

    public ActionResult Action1(){
        var user = _userDatabase.GetById(10);
        var product = _productDatabase.GetById(20);
    }

    public ActionResult Action2() {
        var ratings = _ratingDatabase.GetById(20);
        var comments = _commentsDatabase.GetById(20);
    }
}

This contoller has two actions. None of these actions is using all dependencies of the controller. Furthermore there is a lot of noise for passing the dependencies to the controller via constructor injection.

Instead, I would like to pass the dependencies of an action to that action directly as a parameter. We have our own routing that would easily support this.

class Action1Dependencies {
    public IUserDatabase UserDatabase {get; set;}
    public IProductDatabase ProductDatabase {get; set;}
}

class Action2Dependencies {
    public IRatingDatabase RatingDatabase  {get; set;}
    public ICommentsDatabase CommentsDatabase  {get; set;}
}

class MyController {
    public static ActionResult Action1(Action1Dependencies d){
        var user = d.UserDatabase.GetById(10);
        var product = d.ProductDatabase.GetById(20);
    }   

    public static ActionResult Action2(Action2Dependencies d) {
        var ratings = d.RatingDatabase.GetById(20);
        var comments = d.CommentsDatabase.GetById(20);
    }
}

Therefore I would like to make a call like var dependencies = container.GetInstance<Action2Dependencies>(); and have StructureMap set all properties of Action2Dependencies via setter injection.

With C# 7 and support for tuples the code above could also possibly become

class MyController {
    public static ActionResult Action1((IUserDatabase UserDatabase, IProductDatabase ProductDatabase) d){
        var user = d.UserDatabase.GetById(10);
        var product = d.ProductDatabase.GetById(20);
    }   

    public static ActionResult Action2((IRatingDatabase RatingDatabase, ICommentsDatabase CommentsDatabase) d) {
        var ratings = d.RatingDatabase.GetById(20);
        var comments = d.CommentsDatabase.GetById(20);
    }
}
  • Why do you want to do this? This is a bad idea, because if you change your dependencies you have multiple places to edit and you gain no benefit doing it this way.... – Milney Mar 27 '17 at 8:36
  • Amend the Dependencies class to have a constructor that expects all of the internal dependencies and StructureMap will then handle the injection for you. Also, if you're doing it because you have many dependencies, you might be interested to check github.com/jbogard/MediatR – haim770 Mar 27 '17 at 8:37
  • Although it is fine to abstract a group of dependencies behind an Aggregate Service, I think you are missing an abstraction here. To simplify the Action, it's more common to move these dependencies with their logic into the business layer and let this business component return the data back in a way that is tailored for the Controller. This way there's little behavior left in the Controller. – Steven Mar 27 '17 at 10:48
  • Please see my edit in my question. – Alex Mar 28 '17 at 8:33
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As @haim770 suggests, you have to create a constructor in your Dependencies class that expects all your dependencies.

But in that case, you will just move the problem from the controller to your Dependencies class.

// Dependencies of Controller
class Dependencies {
    public IUserDatabase UserDatabase { get; set; }
    public IProductDatabase ProductDatabase { get; set; }
    // more dependencies ...

    public Dependencies(IUserDatabase userDatabase, IProductDatabase productDatabase)
    {
        UserDatabase = userDatabase;
        ProductDatabase = productDatabase;
    }
}

Then, your container code will work.

var container = new Container();
var dependencies = container.GetInstance<Dependencies>();
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This is possible via Setter Injection Policies, see http://structuremap.github.io/setter-injection/.

var container = new Container(x => {
    x.Policies.SetAllProperties(
        policy => policy.Matching(              
            property => property.DeclaringType == typeof(Dependencies)
    );
});

You can also define your Policies in a more general way and use a marker interface for your dependency objects for example.

interface IDependencies {}
property => typeof(IDependencies).IsAssignableFrom(property.DeclaringType)

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