165

Trying to implement a module following the official handbook, I get this error message:

Uncaught ReferenceError: exports is not defined

at app.js:2

But nowhere in my code do I ever use the name exports.

How can I fix this?


Files

app.ts

let a = 2;
let b:number = 3;

import Person = require ('./mods/module-1');

module-1.t

 export class Person {
  constructor(){
    console.log('Person Class');
  }
}
export default Person;

tsconfig.json

{
   "compilerOptions": {
        "module": "commonjs",
        "target": "es5",
        "noImplicitAny": false,
        "sourceMap": true,
        "outDir": "scripts/"
    },
    "exclude": [
        "node_modules"
    ]
}
5
  • 1
    Are you sure you did not type exports with an s at the end instead of export? That would explain the error message as with s is wrong.
    – Igor
    Mar 27 '17 at 10:18
  • i type export not exports
    – George C.
    Mar 27 '17 at 10:29
  • any example from repositorie that gona work 10000%
    – George C.
    Mar 27 '17 at 10:41
  • Where is this being run? On a web page? On a node.js server? You will need a module loader in the run-time environment that the javascript finally runs in. From the compiler flags you are using commonjs. I am not that familiar with commonjs, but you will need to get commonjs set up before Typescript modules will work or you will need to change to another module loader (like require.js) and get that one set up. Apr 19 '17 at 19:23

24 Answers 24

87

Few other Solutions for this issue

  • Add the following line before other references to Javascript. This is a nice little hack.
   <script>var exports = {};</script>
4
  • 3
    @ChuckLeButt Hope this helps stackoverflow.com/questions/19059580/… Apr 25 '18 at 23:43
  • 21
    I hate that this works! And it definitely works. Isn't there a way to get TypeScript to transpile into something that Node expects? Is it even Node that's complaining? Or is it the browser? I can't stand not understanding what the problem actually is. Feb 14 '20 at 18:08
  • 2
    This works like a charm. From the bottom of my heart: Thank you Sep 10 '21 at 14:28
  • 1
    this feels like something from the Alchemist, thank you Dec 7 '21 at 9:17
75

EDIT:

This answer might not work depending if you're not targeting es5 anymore, I'll try to make the answer more complete.

Original Answer

If CommonJS isn't installed (which defines exports), you have to remove this line from your tsconfig.json:

 "module": "commonjs",

As per the comments, this alone may not work with later versions of tsc. If that is the case, you can install a module loader like CommonJS, SystemJS or RequireJS and then specify that.

Note:

Look at your main.js file that tsc generated. You will find this at the very top:

Object.defineProperty(exports, "__esModule", { value: true });

It is the root of the error message, and after removing "module": "commonjs",, it will vanish.

19
  • 20
    Yeah I recompiled my .ts file and the error still exists after commenting out "module": "commonJs", :(
    – Ari Seyhun
    Sep 22 '17 at 9:17
  • 12
    If installing CommonJS will make this error go away, then how does one actually install CommonJS? I have spent the better part of an hour Googling, and I cannot find any instructions on how to do so. Can someone please explain?
    – Sturm
    Oct 8 '18 at 14:45
  • 1
    @Sturm My answer may be worded confusingly. CommonJS is only a specification. You can find a (not necessarily exhaustive) list of implementations here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CommonJS
    – iFreilicht
    Oct 13 '18 at 22:00
  • 2
    I have module: amd, not module: commonjs, and I have this line in my transpiled .js file.
    – pabrams
    Apr 5 '19 at 16:45
  • 4
    If you have target as ES3 or ES5 in your tsconfig.json then typescript will automatically set your module to CommonJS if it's not defined. Removing module isn't enough, you need to set something else instead - see typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/compiler-options.html
    – Jake
    Jul 2 '19 at 6:17
49

A solution:

Remove "type": "module" from package.json.

2
  • 1
    but why does this help?
    – DauleDK
    Oct 8 '20 at 13:07
  • 1
    @DauleDK because we use Webpack to bundle app, this field has usage in node.js engine. in webpack config we ues common module system Oct 8 '20 at 14:26
17

npm install @babel/plugin-transform-modules-commonjs

and add to to .babelrc plugins resolved my question.

0
17

This is fixed by setting the module compiler option to es6:

{
  "compilerOptions": {     
    "module": "es6",
    "target": "es5",    
  }
}
2
  • This was it for me. Using Laravel Mix with Typescript.
    – Orchis
    Apr 30 '21 at 14:41
  • if you use nodejs you need to add "moduleResolution": "Node" to tsconfig.json
    – mixalbl4
    Oct 4 '21 at 7:48
9

my solution is a sum up of everything above with little tricks I added, basically I added this to my html code

<script>var exports = {"__esModule": true};</script>
<script src="js/file.js"></script>

this even allows you to use import instead of require if you're using electron or something, and it works fine with typescript 3.5.1, target: es3 -> esnext.

3
  • 5
    some progress here, the error just changed to be app.js:3 Uncaught ReferenceError: require is not defined Feb 16 '20 at 18:37
  • this happens if nodeIntegration is set to false when creating the window, the error happens because you updated your electronJS or you're following an outdated source. nodeIntegration was true by default, now it's false, so you have to enable it manually if you want to access nodeJS in renderer process. See [Electron require() is not defined][1] [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/44391448/… Feb 16 '20 at 18:51
  • I'm not using electron, anyway I solved in my case by adding parcel to make bundle stuff and removed other tricky ways Feb 16 '20 at 18:56
6

I had the same problem and solved it adding "es5" library to tsconfig.json like this:

{
    "compilerOptions": {
        "target": "es5", //defines what sort of code ts generates, es5 because it's what most browsers currently UNDERSTANDS.
        "module": "commonjs",
        "moduleResolution": "node",
        "sourceMap": true,
        "emitDecoratorMetadata": true, //for angular to be able to use metadata we specify in our components.
        "experimentalDecorators": true, //angular needs decorators like @Component, @Injectable, etc.
        "removeComments": false,
        "noImplicitAny": false,
        "lib": [
            "es2016",
            "dom",
            "es5"
        ]
    }
}
5

For people still having this issue, if your compiler target is set to ES6 you need to tell babel to skip module transformation. To do so add this to your .babelrc file

{
  "presets": [ ["env", {"modules": false} ]]
}
2
  • 1
    Thanks man! I've been trying to work with older code base which dump all into global and scripts are included in browser with the <script> tag. I was hoping to use module along with older code and it seems like that is not possible. This at least allow me to use ES6 and let me deal with export later.
    – huggie
    Feb 9 '18 at 7:01
  • 2
    doing this I got the following error: Using removed Babel 5 option: .modules - Use the corresponding module transform plugin in the plugins option. Check out babeljs.io/docs/plugins/#modules
    – chharvey
    Apr 6 '19 at 15:01
5

I had this same error too. In my case it was because we had an old-fashioned import statement in our TypeScript AngularJS project like this:

import { IAttributes, IScope } from "angular";

which was compiled to JavaScript like this:

"use strict";
Object.defineProperty(exports, "__esModule", { value: true });

This was needed back in the old days because we then used IAttributes in the code and TypeScript wouldn't have known what to do with it otherwise. But after removing the import statement, and converting IAttributes to ng.IAttributes those two JavaScript lines disappeared - and so did the error message.

4
  • 1
    How would that work for a Typescript type? I have to import it, so Typescript compiles it.
    – Tigerware
    Jul 8 '19 at 9:39
  • What do you mean by "Typescript type"? If it's an integeral type known by TypeScript - such as number or string - then you can use that right away. If you define your own types in a module, check this: typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/modules.html
    – MatX
    Jul 8 '19 at 11:18
  • 1
    I meant the type definitions of an external library like @types/jquery from npmjs.com/package/@types/jquery . To make the $ variable usable from within my Typescript code, I put this in my code: import * as $ from "jquery";
    – Tigerware
    Jul 8 '19 at 11:25
  • I am targeting es5, do I need another library like requirejs to make this work?
    – Tigerware
    Jul 8 '19 at 11:26
4

for me, removing "esModuleInterop": true from tsconfig.json did the trick.

2
  • How does removing it work since exports can ONLY be used if esModuleInterop is set to true ? Jan 11 '21 at 12:48
  • This worked for me (removed the above error). I'm using ESM with typescript (with jest), so I don't want exports.
    – crimbo
    Jan 20 '21 at 23:41
4

I had similar issue as the original poster of the question:

I better tell you what mistakes I made and how I corrected it, that might help someone.

I had javascript nodejs project and converted it to typescript.

Previously in package.json I had "type":"module" when I was running in JavaScript.

When I converted it to TypeScript project and started converting files in .ts files and started running using following command:

npx tsc test.ts && node test.ts

I would get the above error.

I got rid of the error by simply removing the "type":"module" from package.json

My tsconfig.json would like below:

{
    "compilerOptions": {
        "target": "esnext",
        "lib": ["es6", "es5", "es7", "dom"],
        "allowJs": true,
        "esModuleInterop": true,
        "allowSyntheticDefaultImports": true,
        "strict": true,
        "forceConsistentCasingInFileNames": true,
        "module": "es6",
        "outDir": "./build",
        "moduleResolution": "node",
        "resolveJsonModule": true,
        "skipLibCheck": true
    },
    "exclude": ["node_modules", "build"]

I am using node 14 and TypeScript 4.2.4

2
  • Thanks Krunal, this also helped me! Aug 15 '21 at 15:52
  • Same for me, transitioning from JavaScript and this fixed it.
    – Joe Coder
    Jan 19 at 17:35
4

I ran into this issue a few weeks ago and used the exports hack above in the short term but finally figured out another way around this that's working great for me.

So unlike some of the other responses above, I actually wanted the code I'm compiling to be a module. By setting "target": "es6", "module": "esnext" and then linking to my compiled JS file with type="module" instead of type="text/javascript", my compiled code no longer has the Object.defineProperty(exports, "__esModule", { value: true }); line and it's still a module 🎉

My tsconfig:

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    "target": "es6",
    "experimentalDecorators": true,
    "emitDecoratorMetadata": true,
    "module": "esnext",
    "moduleResolution": "node",
    "lib": ["es2016", "esnext", "dom"],
    "outDir": "build",
    "strict": true,
    "strictNullChecks": true,
    "esModuleInterop": true,
    "forceConsistentCasingInFileNames": true,
    "declaration": true,
  },
  "include": ["src/index.ts"],
  "exclude": ["build"]
}

My link to my compiled code in HTML head tags:

<script src="../build/index.js" type="module" defer></script>

As a bonus, now I can also import anything that I export in that index.js file in a separate type="module" script down below the main HTML body code:

 <script type="module">
   import { coolEncodingFunction, coolDecodingFunction } from "../build/index.js";
   /* Do stuff with coolEncodingFunction and coolDecodingFunction */
   /* ... */
</script>
2
  • 1
    <script Type="Module" with "module": "ES2020" worked for me.
    – AltWouss
    Jun 18 '21 at 10:34
  • Error: tsconfig.json(8,15): error TS6046: Argument for '--module' option must be: 'none', 'commonjs', 'amd', 'system', 'umd', 'es6', 'es2015', 'esnext'. Nov 18 '21 at 19:41
2

Simply add libraryTarget: 'umd', like so

const webpackConfig = {
  output: {
    libraryTarget: 'umd' // Fix: "Uncaught ReferenceError: exports is not defined".
  }
};

module.exports = webpackConfig; // Export all custom Webpack configs.
2

in package.json add in "type": "module" in terminal type in

npx tsc --init

it will create a tsconfig.json change "target": "es5" to "target": "es6"

comment out //"module": "commonjs", uncomment "moduleResolution": "node",

you should be good to go in package.json create a build script

"build": "tsc -p tsconfig.json"

then when you want to build you just compile npm run build

then execute and should be good

1

For some ASP.NET projects import and export may not be used at all in your Typescripts.

The question's error showed up when I attempted to do so and I only discovered later that I just needed to add the generated JS script to the View like so:

<script src="~/scripts/js/[GENERATED_FILE].Index.js" asp-append-version="true"></script>
1

Note: This might not be applicable for OP's answer, but I was getting this error, and this how I solved it.

So the problem that I was facing was that I was getting this error when I retrieved a 'js' library from a particular CDN.

The only wrong thing that I was doing was importing from the CDN's cjs directory like so: https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/npm/@popperjs/core@2.4.0/dist/cjs/popper.min.js

Notice the dist/cjs part? That's where the problem was.

I went back to the CDN (jsdelivr) in my case and navigated to find the umd folder. And I could find another set of popper.min.js which was the correct file to import: https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/npm/@popperjs/core@2.4.0/dist/umd/popper.min.js.

1

To solve this issue, put these two lines in your index.html page.

<script>var exports = {"__esModule": true};</script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="/main.js">

Make sure to check your main.js file path.

1
  • This only works if you don't have any require() statements in your code. Oct 9 '20 at 11:02
0

Try what @iFreilicht suggested above. If that didn't work after you've installed webpack and all, you may have just copied a webpack configuration from somewhere online and configured there that you want the output to support CommonJS by mistake. Make sure this isn't the case in webpack.config.js:

module.exports = {
  mode: process.env.NODE_ENV || "development",
  entry: { 
    index: "./src/js/index.ts"
  },
  ...
  ...
  output: {
    libraryTarget: 'commonjs',         <==== DELETE THIS LINE
    path: path.join(__dirname, 'build'),
    filename: "[name].bundle.js"
  }
};
0

Had the same issue and fixed it by changing the JS packages loading order.

Check the order in which the packages you need are being called and load them in an appropriate order.

In my specific case (not using module bundler) I needed to load Redux, then Redux Thunk, then React Redux. Loading React Redux before Redux Thunk would give me exports is not defined.

0

I had the same issue, but my setup required a different solution.

I'm using the create-react-app-rewired package with a config-overrides.js file. Previously, I was using the addBabelPresets import (in the override() method) from customize-cra and decided to abstract those presets to a separate file. Coincidentally, this solved my problem.

I added useBabelRc() to the override() method in config-overrides.js and created a babel.config.js file with the following:

module.exports = {
    presets: [
        '@babel/preset-react',
        '@babel/preset-env'
    ],
}
0

I stuck with such error in a SSR client part because it used a lib which was built with tsconfig.json compilerOptions as target: ES5 what brought using CommonJS for module resolution tsc CLI Options Compiler Options: target === "ES3" or "ES5" ? "CommonJS" : "ES6". While it used the target ESNext.

0

As ES5/ES2009 doesn't support modules (import/export/require) on the client / browser you have to use libraries, which bundle the modules into a single file, which can be included via <script> tag, such as

See also this answer.

-1
  {
    "compileOnSave": false,
    "compilerOptions": {
      "baseUrl": "./",
      "outDir": "./dist",
      "sourceMap": true,
      "declaration": false,
      "module": "esnext",
      "moduleResolution": "node",
      "emitDecoratorMetadata": true,
      "experimentalDecorators": true,
      "target": "es5",
      "typeRoots": ["node_modules/@types"],
      "lib": ["es2018", "dom"]
    }
  }
1
  • 7
    Welcome to StackOverflow. Please add some context to your answer or some explanation so the user can understand what was done. Only posting a JSON may not be as helpful... Jun 18 '20 at 2:51
-1

If you are just using interfaces for types, leave out the export keyword and ts can pick up on the types without needing to import. They key is you cannot use import/export anywhere.

export interface Person {
   name: string;
   age: number;
}

into

interface Person {
   name: string;
   age: number;
}

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