20

Other than hashes as last argument, you can drop parenthesis in Ruby on method invocations and get consistent results (you still have to mind the priority).

However, I encountered an example where this is not the case:

''.split(/ ./) # => []
''.split /./   # => []
''.split / ./  # !> SyntaxError: unexpected '.'

Is this a bug/regression (I tested it with 2.1.2 -> 2.4.1 Rubys)?

Are there other generic cases where dropping the parens doesn't work as expected?


Reported it, lets see.


Update: The ticket was rejected a bit ambiguously. It's not clear if it's a bug or not, but it won't get fixed and using %r{} in these situations was suggested. The cause is indeed that the opening slash is interpreted as division.

  • 3
    yes, parser seems to be confused by the space in the regex... – Sergio - Reinstate Monica Mar 27 '17 at 12:53
  • 1
    There's no problem with hashes, btw. They don't require parentheses. – Sergio - Reinstate Monica Mar 27 '17 at 12:59
  • 1
    @thesecretmaster: but that's a different thing. It also matches tabs, for example. – Sergio - Reinstate Monica Mar 27 '17 at 12:59
  • 1
    @thesecretmaster, what if I only want spaces and not other types of whitespaces? – ndnenkov Mar 27 '17 at 12:59
  • 6
    There parsers sees the single / as an operator, i.e. division. – Stefan Mar 27 '17 at 13:03
19

In addition to thesecretmaster's answer, let's take a look inside the Ruby parser:

require 'ripper'
require 'pp'

pp Ripper.lex("''.split /./")
# [[[1,  0], :on_tstring_beg,     "'"    ],
#  [[1,  1], :on_tstring_end,     "'"    ],
#  [[1,  2], :on_period,          "."    ],
#  [[1,  3], :on_ident,           "split"],
#  [[1,  8], :on_sp,              " "    ],
#  [[1,  9], :on_regexp_beg,      "/"    ],
#  [[1, 10], :on_tstring_content, "."    ],
#  [[1, 11], :on_regexp_end,      "/"    ]]

Adding a space makes Ruby recognize the / characters as division operators:

pp Ripper.lex("''.split / ./")
# [[[1,  0], :on_tstring_beg, "'"    ],
#  [[1,  1], :on_tstring_end, "'"    ],
#  [[1,  2], :on_period,      "."    ],
#  [[1,  3], :on_ident,       "split"],
#  [[1,  8], :on_sp,          " "    ],
#  [[1,  9], :on_op,          "/"    ],
#  [[1, 10], :on_sp,          " "    ],
#  [[1, 11], :on_period,      "."    ],
#  [[1, 12], :on_op,          "/"    ]]

Are there other generic cases where dropping the parens doesn't work as expected?

Contrived example:

def foo(i = 1)
  10 * i
end

foo(- 2) #=> -20
foo - 2  #=> 8

Another one:

b = 2
def a(arg)
  arg
end

a *b    #=> 2

a = 5

a *b    #=> 10

The first a *b is interpreted as a(*b), whereas the second becomes a * b. Adding parentheses forces Ruby to invoke the method:

a(*b)   #=> 2
  • Awesome, I'll include this in the bug report if you don't mind. – ndnenkov Mar 27 '17 at 13:26
  • Nice one with the unary vs binary minus as well. I haven't thought about it. – ndnenkov Mar 27 '17 at 13:44
  • 3
    You can call a(*b) at the end of your last example for a better WTF effect. – Eric Duminil Mar 27 '17 at 15:49
9

While this certainly seems like an issue, it isn't a very significant one because \s in regex will catch spaces. For example:

''.split(/ ./) # => []
''.split /./   # => []
''.split / ./  # !> SyntaxError: unexpected '.'
''.split /\s./ # => []

Or if you want to match only a space you just have to propperly escape it:

''.split /\ ./ # => []

Ruby should parse the arguments the same inside or outside parens, so I'd file a bug, but it's not very urgent and the ruby people may be happy simply leaving it.

Actually, @Stefan mentioned in comments to the questions that it's probably the parser reading it as devision, which is the most likely explanation, so it's not even a bug. But it's one of those fun little ruby quirks.

@Stefan also added that you can create an unambiguous regex literal with the %r{ .} syntax.

  • 1
    And I can escape the number 8 with \8 if I want to, but why? Characters with no special meaning in regexes should match that character literally. – ndnenkov Mar 27 '17 at 13:02
  • Probably a parser issue. I'd submit a bug but it's not a very urgent this. There is probably an explanation involving ruby parsing whitespace, but it should be parsed the same as an argument in and out of parens. – thesecretmaster Mar 27 '17 at 13:05
  • 1
    %r{ .} is another option to create an unambiguous regex. – Stefan Mar 27 '17 at 13:11
  • @Stefan That's probably what's recommended now, right? You should really write these things up as an answer, you have a lot more to say then my simple "escape the space" answer. – thesecretmaster Mar 27 '17 at 13:12
9

Division or regex?

As written in @Stefan's answer, Ruby tries to parse it as a division.

But without parens, it can be really hard to tell division and regex apart.

For example, how does Ruby parse :

a /b/i

?

Surprisingly, either as a division or a Regex, depending on the context.

def a(object)
  puts object.class
end
b = 4
i = 3

a /b/i
# Regexp

a = 24
a /b/i
# 2

If a is defined as a variable before being a method, the script will raise a NameError :

a = 24
def a(object)
  puts object.class
end
a(/b/i)
#Regexp
a /b/i
# 5:in `<main>': undefined local variable or method `b' for main:Object (NameError)

I'd say that the fuzzy logic behind the parsing makes some bugs or surprising results unavoidable.

% : String delimiter or modulo ?

Here's a similar example, this time with %q. Is it a string delimiter or modulo q ?

def a(x)
  puts x
end

a(%q+t+)
# t
a %q+t+
# t

a = 4
def a(x)
  puts x
end

a(%q+t+)
# t
a %q+t+
# syntax error, unexpected end-of-input

It might be the first time I see a SyntaxError depending on the previous value of a variable.

& : Proc->Block, Bitwise AND or set intersection?

a &b can be interpreted in at least 3 different ways :

def a
  yield
end

b = ->{ puts "BLOCK" }

a &b
# BLOCK

a = 3
b = 5
a &b
# 1

a = [1,2,3]
b = [3,4,5]
a &b
# [3]

Many symbols are used in more than one way with Ruby, so there probably are many other examples of fuzzy syntax.

  • 1
    Awesome example. It keeps the gist of the question, at the same time shows it's not that obvious. Also I expected the parser to pick one or the other interpretation consistently. I didn't know it can understand that much context. – ndnenkov Mar 27 '17 at 13:47
  • 1
    I have to side with the parser on the % example. () forces method invocation. If not forced, a has to be a method or a local variable. If both are defined, local variables take priority. It might not work as someone have expected in some cases, but it's consistent and easy to follow. Unlike the list of other examples here that show the parser being smart 99.99% of the time and failing in obscure ways in the remaining 0.01%. But it's still a good example to show another class of problems when omitting parens. – ndnenkov Mar 27 '17 at 15:50
  • @ndn: Your explanation makes sense. I was surprised to still be able to call the method when its name has been overridden by a local variable, though. Since it's discouraged anyway, I never thought about what would happen in that case. Anyway, which other examples do you find surprising? Except the original one in OP, I wasn't surprised anywhere. – Eric Duminil Mar 27 '17 at 15:56
  • Stefan's unary vs binary. I never stopped to think about how smart Ruby tries to be with all the literal syntax available to notice that little things like that can throw it off. It ruins the magic for me a bit now that I'm more mindful of it. :/ – ndnenkov Mar 27 '17 at 16:03
  • @ndn: Interesting. I guess we all have different expectations for the principle of least surprise. The unary vs binary example was 100% clear to me, either with - 2 or -2. – Eric Duminil Mar 27 '17 at 16:43

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